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William D. Hill
William David Hill (October 1, 1833 – December 26, 1906) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio. Born in Nelson County, Virginia, Hill attended the country schools and Antioch College. He moved to Springfield, Ohio, and published the Ohio Press in 1858. He studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1859 and commenced practice in Springfield, Ohio. He served as mayor of Springfield 1861-1863. He served as member of the State house of representatives 1866-1870. He served as member of the Board of Education of Defiance, Ohio. Superintendent of insurance 1875-1878. He served as delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1880 and 1888. Hill was elected as a Democrat to the Forty-sixth Congress (March 4, 1879 – March 3, 1881). Hill was elected to the Forty-eighth and Forty-ninth Congresses (March 4, 1883 – March 3, 1887). He served as chairman of the Committee on Territories (Forty-ninth Congress). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1886 to the Fiftieth Congress
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United States House Of Representatives
Majority (238)     Republican (238)Minority (193)     Democratic (193)Vacant (4)     Vacant (4)Length of termTwo yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post in most states; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 statesLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting State legislatures or redistricting commissions, varies by stateMeeting placeHouse of Representatives chamber United States
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
/oʊˈhaɪ.oʊ/ ( listen) is a Midwestern state in the Great Lakes region
Great Lakes region
of the United States. Ohio
Ohio
is the 34th largest by area, the 7th most populous, and the 10th most densely populated of the 50 United States. The state's capital and largest city is Columbus. The state takes its name from the Ohio
Ohio
River
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Copyright Status Of Work By The U.S. Government
A work of the United States
United States
government, as defined by the United States copyright law, is "a work prepared by an officer or employee" of the federal government "as part of that person's official duties."[1] In general, under section 105 of the Copyright Act,[2] such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law and are therefore in the public domain. This act only applies to U.S. domestic copyright as that is the extent of U.S. federal law. The U.S. government asserts that it can still hold the copyright to those works in other countries.[3][4] Publication of an otherwise protected work by the U.S. government does not put that work in the public domain. For example, government publications may include works copyrighted by a contractor or grantee; copyrighted material assigned to the U.S
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Biographical Directory Of The United States Congress
The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
United States Congress
is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress
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Los Angeles, California
Los AngelesCSA Los Angeles-Long BeachMSA Los Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimPueblo September 4, 1781[3]City status May 23, 1835[4]Incorporated April 4, 1850[5]Named for Our Lady, Queen of the AngelsGovernment • Type Mayor-Council-Commission[6] • Body Los Angeles
Los Angeles
City Council • Mayor Eric Garcetti[7] • City Attorney Mike Feuer[7] • City Controller Ron Galperin[7]Area[8] • City in California 502.76 sq m
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Kalispell, Montana
Kalispell (ˈkæl əˌspɛl, ˌkæl əˈspɛl) is a city in, and the county seat of Flathead County, Montana, United States.[4] The 2015 Census
Census
estimates put Kalispell's population at 22,052.[5] The Kalispell Micropolitan Statistical Area has a population of 93,068 and it is the largest city and commercial center of northwest Montana.[6] The name Kalispell is a Salish word meaning "flat land above the lake". Kalispell is also the gateway to Glacier National Park.Contents1 History 2 Geography and climate 3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Transportation 5 Agriculture 6 Local media 7 Notable people 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]Main Street, KalispellWorking using his own capital, Charles Edward Conrad, a businessman and banker from Fort Benton, Montana, formed the Kalispell Townsite Company with three other men.[7] The townsite was quickly platted and lots began selling by the spring of 1891
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50th United States Congress
The Fiftieth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1887, to March 4, 1889, during the third and fourth years of Grover Cleveland's first presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Tenth Census of the United States in 1880
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Admission To The Bar In The United States
Admission to the bar in the United States
Admission to the bar in the United States
is the granting of permission by a particular court system to a lawyer to practice law in that system. Each U.S state and similar jurisdiction (e.g., territories under federal control) has its own court system and sets its own rules for bar admission (or privilege to practice law), which can lead to different admission standards among states. In most cases, a person who is "admitted" to the bar is thereby a "member" of the particular bar. In the canonical case, lawyers seeking admission must earn a Juris Doctor degree from a law school approved by the jurisdiction, and then pass a bar exam administered by it. Typically, there is also a character and fitness evaluation, which includes a background check. However, there are exceptions to each of these requirements. A lawyer who is admitted in one state is not automatically allowed to practice in any other
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Springfield, Ohio
Springfield is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio
Ohio
and the county seat of Clark County.[6] The municipality is located in southwestern Ohio
Ohio
and is situated on the Mad River, Buck Creek and Beaver Creek, approximately 45 miles (72 km) west of Columbus and 25 miles (40 km) northeast of Dayton
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Antioch College
Antioch College
Antioch College
is a private, coeducational liberal arts college in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Founded in 1850 by the Christian Connection, the college began operating in 1852; politician and education reformer Horace Mann
Horace Mann
became its first president. It was the founding, constituent college of Antioch University
Antioch University
System, which Antioch College remained a part of until 2008. The college remained closed for three years before reopening in 2011, and fully separated from the university as an independent institution by 2014. Antioch is one of only a few liberal-arts institutions in the United States featuring a cooperative education work program mandatory for all students
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Democratic Party (United States)
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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United States Democratic Party
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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Litchfield, Illinois
Litchfield is a city in Montgomery County, Illinois, United States. The population was 6,939 at the 2010 census,[5] and 6,588 in 2009 and 7,012 in 2015. It is located in south central Illinois, south of Springfield and northeast of Metro-East.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Arts and culture4.1 Attractions5 Infrastructure5.1 Transportation6 Notable people 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] In 1853, the town was developed when the Terre Haute, Alton and St. Louis Railroad came through the area.[1] It was named for E
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Nelson County, Virginia
Nelson County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15,020.[1] Its county seat is Lovingston.[2] Nelson County is part of the Charlottesville, VA Metropolitan Statistical Area. Nelson County is home to Wintergreen Resort, a local ski area; Swannanoa mansion and is the location of Walton's Mountain made famous by the television show, The Waltons. Nelson County is also home to ten wineries, five craft breweries, two cideries, two distilleries, many fruit orchards and Crabtree Falls.Contents1 History1.1 Hurricane Camille2 Geography2.1 Adjacent counties 2.2 National protected areas 2.3 Major highways3 Education 4 Demographics 5 Recreation 6 Communities 7 Notable people 8 Politics 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] At the time the English began settling Virginia in the 1600s, the inhabitants of what is now Nelson County were a Siouan-speaking tribe called the Nahyssan
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