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William Calder Marshall
William Calder Marshall
William Calder Marshall
RA (18 March 1813 – 16 June 1894) was a Scottish sculptor.Contents1 Life 2 References 3 Sources 4 External linksLife[edit] Born in Edinburgh, he attended the Royal High School and Edinburgh University before enrolling at the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
school in London
London
in 1834, where he won the silver medal. He studied under Francis Chantrey and Edward Hodges Baily, and then, in 1836 went to Rome to pursue his study of classical sculpture, staying for two years. In 1844, he participated in an exhibition held at Westminster Hall
Westminster Hall
to select artists to decorate the rebuilt Palace of Westminster
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Stevenage
Stevenage
Stevenage
(/ˈstiːvənɪdʒ/ STEE-vən-ij) is a town and borough in Hertfordshire, England. Roughly 28 miles (44 km) north of central London as the crow flies,[2] Stevenage
Stevenage
is situated to the east of junctions 7 and 8 of the A1(M), and is between Letchworth
Letchworth
Garden City to the north, and Welwyn Garden City
Welwyn Garden City
to the south
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Sidney Lee
Sir Sidney Lee
Sidney Lee
FBA (5 December 1859 – 3 March 1926) was an English biographer, writer and critic.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Lee was born Solomon Lazarus Lee in 1859 at 12 Keppel Street, Bloomsbury, London. He was educated at the City of London
London
School and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he graduated in modern history in 1882. In 1883, Lee became assistant-editor of the Dictionary of National Biography. In 1890 he became joint editor, and on the retirement of Sir Leslie Stephen
Leslie Stephen
in 1891, succeeded him as editor. Lee wrote over 800 articles in the Dictionary, mainly on Elizabethan authors or statesmen. His sister Elizabeth Lee also contributed. While still at Balliol, Lee had written two articles on Shakespearean questions, which were printed in The Gentleman's Magazine
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Prince Albert Of Saxe-Coburg And Gotha
Prince Albert of Saxe- Coburg
Coburg
and Gotha (Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel;[1] 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria. He was born in the Saxon duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, to a family connected to many of Europe's ruling monarchs. At the age of 20, he married his first cousin, Queen Victoria; they had nine children. Initially he felt constrained by his role of consort, which did not afford him power or responsibilities. He gradually developed a reputation for supporting public causes, such as educational reform and the abolition of slavery worldwide, and was entrusted with running the Queen's household, office and estates. He was heavily involved with the organisation of the Great Exhibition of 1851, which was a resounding success. Victoria came to depend more and more on his support and guidance
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Kensington Gardens
Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, are among the Royal Parks of London. The gardens are shared by the City of Westminster and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea
Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea
and sit immediately to the west of Hyde Park, in western central London. The gardens cover an area of 270 acres.[1] The open spaces of Kensington Gardens, Hyde Park, Green Park, and St. James's Park
St. James's Park
together form an almost continuous "green lung" in the heart of London
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Parian Ware
Parian ware
Parian ware
is a type of bisque porcelain imitating marble. It was developed around 1845 by the Staffordshire pottery
Staffordshire pottery
manufacturer Mintons, and named after Paros, the Greek island renowned for its fine-textured, white Parian marble, used since antiquity for sculpture. It was also contemporaneously referred to as Statuary Porcelain by Copeland. Parian was essentially designed to imitate carved marble,[1] with the great advantage that it could be prepared in a liquid form and cast in a mould, enabling mass production.Contents1 Invention 2 Hand crafting 3 Composition 4 Uses 5 British Parian manufacturers 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksInvention[edit] The early history of the invention of Parian was confused at the time, with several firms producing biscuit, working concurrently to produce an improved material, claiming credit
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William Taylor Copeland
William Taylor Copeland, MP, Alderman (1797 – 12 April 1868) was a British businessman and politician who served as Lord Mayor of London and a Member of Parliament.Contents1 Family and business 2 An artistic legacy 3 Public life 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksFamily and business[edit] The family traces its descent back to John of Copeland, who in 1346 captured the King of Scotland
King of Scotland
at the Battle of Neville's Cross.[1] Copeland was the only son of William Copeland, partner of Josiah Spode in the Stoke Potteries, of Staffordshire and of Portugal Street, London. He succeeded his father as head of the porcelain firm in Portugal Street, London
London
and eventually bought out the interests of the Spode
Spode
family in the business in the Potteries and London
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Stephen Bayley
Stephen Paul Bayley (born 13 October 1951) is a British design critic, cultural critic, journalist and author.Contents1 Childhood and education 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Selected publications 5 ReferencesChildhood and education[edit] Bayley was born in Cardiff, Wales
Wales
and spent his childhood years in Liverpool, England, attending Booker Avenue County Primary School and Quarry Bank High school (now known as Calderstones School). He was inspired by Liverpool's architecture and its built environment. He was later educated at Manchester University
Manchester University
and the University of Liverpool
Liverpool
School of Architecture. Career[edit] He has worked as a museum curator
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Dictionary Of National Biography
The Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.Contents1 First series 2 Supplements and revisions 3 Concise dictionary 4 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography 5 First series contents 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksFirst series[edit] Hoping to emulate national biographical collections published elsewhere in Europe, such as the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (1875), in 1882 the publisher George Smith (1824–1901), of Smith, Elder & Co., planned a universal dictionary that would include biographical entries on individuals from world history. He approached Leslie Stephen, then editor of the Cornhill Magazine, owned by Smith, to become the editor
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Royal Academy
The Royal Academy of Arts
Royal Academy of Arts
(RA) is an art institution based in Burlington House
Burlington House
on Piccadilly
Piccadilly
in London
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Smith, Elder & Co.
Smith, Elder & Co. or Smith, Elder, and Co.[1] or Smith, Elder and Co.[2][3] was a British publishing company who were most noted for the works they published in the 19th century.Contents1 History 2 Works published 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The firm was founded by George Smith (1789–1846) and Alexander Elder (1790–1876) and successfully continued by George Murray Smith (1824–1901)
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially-based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names. The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
prepared cards of bibliographic information for their library catalog and would sell duplicate sets of the cards to other libraries for use in their catalogs
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. ISNI can be used to disambiguate names that might otherwise be confused, and links the data about names that are collected and used in all sectors of the media industries. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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