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Will Geer
Will Geer
Will Geer
(March 9, 1902 – April 22, 1978) was an American actor and social activist, known for his portrayal of Grandpa Zebulon Tyler Walton in the 1970s TV series
TV series
The Waltons.Contents1 Personal life 2 Early career 3 Blacklist 4 Later years 5 TV and filmography 6 Discography 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksPersonal life[edit] Geer was born William Aughe Ghere in Frankfort, Indiana, the son of Katherine (née Aughe), a teacher, and Roy Aaron Ghere, a postal worker.[1][2] His father left the family when the boy was only 11 years old. He was deeply influenced by his grandfather, who taught him the botanical names of the plants in his native state. Geer started out to become a botanist, studying the subject and obtaining a master's degree at the University of Chicago
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Cheryl Crawford
Cheryl Crawford (September 24, 1902 – October 7, 1986) was an American theatre producer and director. Born in Akron, Ohio, Crawford majored in drama at Smith College. Following graduation, she moved to New York City
New York City
and enrolled at the Theatre Guild's school. By then she knew that she didn't want to pursue an acting career, but saw no other way to gain access to the organization producing the highest quality theatre of its time. Finishing their training in 1927, she was hired by Theresa Helburn, the Guild's Executive Director, as a casting secretary. She then worked her way through various backstage jobs, including assistant stage manager, to assistant to the “Board of Managers,” an importantant administrative job.[1] While working at the Guild, she met Harold Clurman and Lee Strasberg
Lee Strasberg
who had also been working there as play reader and actor, respectively
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San Francisco General Strike
The 1934 West Coast Waterfront Strike (also known as the 1934 West Coast Longshoremen's Strike, as well as a number of variations on these names) lasted eighty-three days, triggered by sailors and a four-day general strike in San Francisco, and led to the unionization of all of the West Coast ports of the United States. The San Francisco
San Francisco
General Strike, along with the 1934 Toledo Auto-Lite Strike led by the
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Folkways Records
Folkways Records
Folkways Records
was a record label founded by Moses Asch that documented folk, world, and children's music. It was acquired by the Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Institution
in 1987 and is now part of Smithsonian Folkways.Contents1 History 2 Smithsonian 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Folkways Records
Folkways Records
& Service Co. was founded by Moses Asch and Marian Distler in 1948 in New York City. Harold Courlander was editor of the Folkways Ethnic Library at the time and is credited with coming up with the name "Folkways" for the label.[1] Asch sought to record and document sounds and music from everywhere in the world. From 1948 until Asch's death in 1986, Folkways Records
Folkways Records
released 2,168 albums
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Daily Worker
The Daily Worker
Daily Worker
was a newspaper published in New York City
New York City
by the Communist Party USA, a formerly Comintern-affiliated organization. Publication began in 1924.[1] While it generally reflected the prevailing views of the party, some attempts were made to reflect a broader spectrum of left-wing opinion. At its peak, the newspaper achieved a circulation of 35,000. Notable contributors to its pages included Robert Minor
Robert Minor
and Fred Ellis (cartoonists), Lester Rodney (sports editor), David Karr, Richard Wright, John L
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Lee Strasberg
Lee Strasberg
Lee Strasberg
(born Israel Strasberg; November 17, 1901 – February 17, 1982) was a Polish-born[1] American actor, director, and theatre practitioner.[2] He co founded, with directors Harold Clurman and Cheryl Crawford, the Group Theatre in 1931, which was hailed as "America's first true theatrical collective".[3] In 1951, he became director of the nonprofit Actors Studio
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Folk Singer
Folk music
Folk music
includes both traditional music and the genre that evolved from it during the 20th century folk revival. The term originated in the 19th century, but is often applied to music older than that. Some types of folk music are also called world music. Traditional folk music has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted orally, music with unknown composers, or music performed by custom over a long period of time. It has been contrasted with commercial and classical styles. Starting in the mid-20th century, a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. This process and period is called the (second) folk revival and reached a zenith in the 1960s
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People's World
The People's World, in Spanish known as the Mundo Popular, is a bilingual news website associated with the Communist Party USA. History[edit] The newspaper, formerly named People's Daily World and later People's Weekly World, in Spanish Nuestro Mundo ("Our World"), is a national, grassroots daily newspaper. It is published by Long View Publishing Co
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1934 West Coast Waterfront Strike
The 1934 West Coast Waterfront Strike (also known as the 1934 West Coast Longshoremen's Strike, as well as a number of variations on these names) lasted eighty-three days, triggered by sailors and a four-day general strike in San Francisco, and led to the unionization of all of the West Coast ports of the United States. The San Francisco
San Francisco
General Strike, along with the 1934 Toledo Auto-Lite Strike led by the
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Communist Party Of The United States
The Communist Party USA
Communist Party USA
(CPUSA) is a communist political party in the United States
United States
established in 1919 after a split in the Socialist Party of America.[5] The CPUSA has a long, complex history that is closely tied with the American labor movement and the histories of communist parties worldwide. The party was influential in American politics in the first half of the 20th century and played a prominent role in the labor movement from the 1920s through the 1940s, becoming known for opposing racism and racial segregation
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Mephistopheles In Popular Culture
This article lists cultural references to Mephistopheles, the fictional devil from Faust
Faust
and Doctor Faustus who has been used in other pieces of literature, film, comics and music.Contents1 Drama 2 Opera 3 Music 4 Film 5 Comics 6 Literature 7 Anime 8 Television 9 Video games 10 Other games 11 See also 12 ReferencesDrama[edit]1604 - Christopher Marlowe's The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus 1802 - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's Faust, Part One 1832 - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's Faust, Part TwoOpera[edit]1816 - Ludwig Spohr's
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Devil
The Devil
Devil
(from Greek: διάβολος diábolos "slanderer, accuser")[1] is the personification and archetype of evil in various cultures.[2] Historically, the Devil
Devil
can be defined as the personification of thatever is perceived in society as evil and the depiction consist of its cultural traditions.[3] In Christianity, the manifestation of the Devil
Devil
is the Hebrew
Hebrew
Satan; the primary opponent of God.[4][5] While in Christiany, the Devil
Devil
was created by God, in Absolute dualism, the Devil
Devil
is alternatively seen as an independent principle besides the good God
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Norman Corwin
Norman Lewis Corwin (May 3, 1910 – October 18, 2011) was an American writer, screenwriter, producer, essayist and teacher of journalism and writing. His earliest and biggest successes were in the writing and directing of radio drama during the 1930s and 1940s. Corwin was among the first producers to regularly use entertainment—even light entertainment—to tackle serious social issues. In this area he was a peer of Orson Welles
Orson Welles
and William N. Robson, and an inspiration to other later radio/TV writers such as Rod Serling, Gene Roddenberry, Norman Lear, J. Michael Straczynski
J. Michael Straczynski
and Yuri Rasovsky. He was the son of Samuel and Rose Corwin and was born in Boston, Massachusetts. Corwin was a major figure during the Golden Age of Radio. During the 1930s and 1940s he was a writer and producer of many radio programs in many genres: history, biography, fantasy, fiction, poetry and drama
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John Steinbeck
John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (/ˈstaɪnbɛk/; February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American author. He won the 1962 Nobel Prize in Literature "for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception".[2] He has been called "a giant of American letters", and many of his works are considered classics of Western literature.[3] During his writing career, he authored 27 books, including 16 novels, six non-fiction books, and two collections of short stories. He is widely known for the comic novels Tortilla Flat
Tortilla Flat
(1935) and Cannery Row (1945), the multi-generation epic East of Eden (1952), and the novellas Of Mice and Men
Of Mice and Men
(1937) and The Red Pony
The Red Pony
(1937)
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Harold Clurman
Harold Edgar Clurman (September 18, 1901 – September 9, 1980) was an American theatre director and drama critic, "one of the most influential in the United States".[1] He was most notable as one of the three founders of New York City's Group Theatre (1931–1941). He directed more than 40 plays in his career[1] and, during the 1950s, was nominated for a Tony Award
Tony Award
as director for several productions. In addition to his directing career, he was drama critic for The New Republic (1948–52) and The Nation (1953–1980), helping shape American theater by writing about it
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Much Ado About Nothing
Much Ado
Much Ado
About Nothing is a comedy by William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
thought to have been written in 1598 and 1599, as Shakespeare was approaching the middle of his career. The play was included in the First Folio, published in 1623. By means of "noting" (which, in Shakespeare's day, sounded similar to "nothing" as in the play's title,[1][2] and which means gossip, rumour, and overhearing), Benedick
Benedick
and Beatrice are tricked into confessing their love for each other, and Claudio is tricked into rejecting Hero at the altar on the erroneous belief that she has been unfaithful
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