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Wildlife Of Iran
The wildlife of Iran
Iran
includes its flora and fauna and their natural habitats. One of the most famous members of wildlife in Iran
Iran
are the world's last surviving, critically endangered Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus) also known as the Iranian cheetah, which are today found nowhere else but in Iran. Iran
Iran
had lost all its elephants,[1] lions and tigers by the 21st century.[2][3][4]Contents1 Flora 2 Fauna2.1 Endangered 2.2 Extinct3 See also 4 References 5 External linksFlora[edit] Fritillaria imperialis
Fritillaria imperialis
of Iran.4000-year-old Cypress of Abarqu, Iran.More than one-tenth of the country is forested. The most extensive growths are found on the mountain slopes rising from the Caspian Sea, with stands of oak, ash, elm, cypress, and other valuable trees
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Stork
Storks are large, long-legged, long-necked wading birds with long, stout bills. They belong to the family called Ciconiidae, and make up the order Ciconiiformes. Ciconiiformes
Ciconiiformes
previously included a number of other families, such as herons and ibises, but those families have been moved to other orders.[2] Storks dwell in many regions and tend to live in drier habitats than the closely related herons, spoonbills and ibises; they also lack the powder down that those groups use to clean off fish slime. Bill-clattering is an important mode of communication at the nest. Many species are migratory. Most storks eat frogs, fish, insects, earthworms, small birds and small mammals
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Panthera
Panthera
Panthera
tigris Panthera
Panthera
uncia Panthera
Panthera
onca Panthera
Panthera
leo Panthera
Panthera
pardus Panthera
Panthera
is a genus within the Felidae
Felidae
family that was named and first described by the German naturalist Oken in 1816.[2] The British taxonomist Pocock revised the classification of this genus in 1916 as comprising the species lion, tiger, jaguar, and leopard on the basis of cranial features.[3] Results of genetic analysis indicate that the snow leopard also belongs to the Panthera, a classification that was accepted by IUCN
IUCN
assessors in 2008.[4][5] Only the tiger, lion, leopard, and jaguar have the anatomical structure that enables them to roar
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Sub-tropical
The subtropics are geographic and climate zones located roughly between the tropics at latitude 23.5° (the Tropic of Cancer
Tropic of Cancer
and Tropic of Capricorn) and temperate zones (normally referring to latitudes 35–66.5°) north and south of the Equator. Subtropical climates are often characterized by warm to hot summers and cool to mild winters with infrequent frost
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Hara Forests
The Mangrove
Mangrove
forests of Qeshm
Qeshm
or Hara forests
Hara forests
of Qeshm
Qeshm
is the common name for mangrove forests on the southern coast of Iran, particularly on and near the island of Qeshm
Qeshm
in the Persian Gulf. Dominated by the species Avicennia marina, known locally as the "hara" or "harra" tree, the forests represent an important ecological resource. The "Hara Protected Area" on Quesm and the nearby mainland is a biosphere reserve where commercial use is restricted to fishing (mainly shrimp), tourist boat trips, and limited mangrove cutting for animal feed.Contents1 Hara tree characteristics 2 Forest
Forest
extent and significance 3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHara tree characteristics[edit] The hara tree, Avicennia marina, grows to heights of three to eight meters and has bright green leaves and twigs
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Plant
Plants are mainly multicellular, predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. They form the clade Viridiplantae (Latin for "green plants") that includes the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns, clubmosses, hornworts, liverworts, mosses and the green algae, and excludes the red and brown algae. Historically, plants were treated as one of two kingdoms including all living things that were not animals, and all algae and fungi were treated as plants. However, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). Green plants have cell walls containing cellulose and obtain most of their energy from sunlight via photosynthesis by primary chloroplasts that are derived from endosymbiosis with cyanobacteria. Their chloroplasts contain chlorophylls a and b, which gives them their green color
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Golden Jackal
The golden jackal ( Canis
Canis
aureus) is a wolf-like canid that is native to Southeast Europe, Southwest Asia, South Asia, and regions of Southeast Asia. Compared with the Arabian wolf, which is the smallest of the gray wolves, ( Canis
Canis
lupus), the jackal is smaller and possesses shorter legs, a shorter tail, a more elongated torso, a less-prominent forehead, and a narrower and more pointed muzzle. The golden jackal's coat can vary in color from a pale creamy yellow in summer to a dark tawny beige in winter. It is listed as Least Concern
Least Concern
on the IUCN Red List due to its widespread distribution and high density in areas with plenty of available food and optimum shelter. The ancestor of the golden jackal is believed to be the extinct Arno river dog that lived in Mediterranean Europe
Mediterranean Europe
1.9 million years ago
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Long-legged Buzzard
The long-legged buzzard ( Buteo
Buteo
rufinus) is a bird of prey in the Buteo genus. It is similar in appearance to the rough-legged buzzard (Buteo lagopus), but it is larger and more robust.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Feeding 4 Subspecies 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit]Illustration by Keulemans, 1874This is one of the largest species of Buteo. Length can range from 50 to 66 cm (20 to 26 in) and wingspan from 115 to 160 cm (45 to 63 in). Females, at an average mass of 1.3 kg (2.9 lb), are larger than males, at an average of 1.1 kg (2.4 lb).[2][3] There are many different colour forms, but usually long-leggeds have a clear orange tint to the plumage, red or orange tail, pale head and largely white underwings. There is usually a distinctive black carpal patch and dark trailing edge to the wing. The rump and "trousers" are often dark or deep rufous
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Bear
†Amphicynodontinae †Hemicyoninae †Ursavinae †Agriotheriinae Ailuropodinae Tremarctinae UrsinaeBears are carnivoran mammals of the family Ursidae. They are classified as caniforms, or doglike carnivorans. Although only eight species of bears are extant, they are widespread, appearing in a wide variety of habitats throughout the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and partially in the Southern Hemisphere. Bears are found on the continents of North America, South America, Europe, and Asia. Common characteristics of modern bears include large bodies with stocky legs, long snouts, small rounded ears, shaggy hair, plantigrade paws with five nonretractile claws, and short tails. While the polar bear is mostly carnivorous, and the giant panda feeds almost entirely on bamboo, the remaining six species are omnivorous with varied diets. With the exception of courting individuals and mothers with their young, bears are typically solitary animals
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Gazelle
Several, see textA gazelle is any of many antelope species in the genus Gazella or formerly considered to belong to it. Six species are included in two genera, Eudorcas
Eudorcas
and Nanger, which were formerly considered subgenera. The genus Procapra has also been considered a subgenus of Gazella, and its members are also referred to as gazelles, though they are not dealt with in this article. Gazelles are known as swift animals. Some are able to run at bursts as high as 100 km/h (60 mph) or run at a sustained speed of 50 km/h (30 mph).[1] Gazelles are found mostly in the deserts, grasslands, and savannas of Africa; but they are also found in southwest and central Asia and the Indian subcontinent
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Sus (genus)
A pig is any of the animals in the genus Sus, within the even-toed ungulate family Suidae. Pigs include the domestic pig and its ancestor, the common Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa), along with other species. Related creatures outside the genus include the peccary, the babirusa, and the warthog. Pigs, like all suids, are native to the Eurasian and African continents
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Wolf
refer Subspecies
Subspecies
of Canis
Canis
lupusHistorical (red + green) and modern (green) range of wild subspecies of C. lupusThe gray wolf ( Canis
Canis
lupus),[a] also known as the timber wolf[3][4] or western wolf,[b] is a canine native to the wilderness and remote areas of Eurasia
Eurasia
and North America
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Jackal
Golden jackal, Canis
Canis
aureus Side-striped jackal
Side-striped jackal
Canis
Canis
adustus Black-backed jackal
Black-backed jackal
Canis
Canis
mesomelasJackals are medium-sized omnivorous mammals of the genus Canis, which also includes wolves, coyotes and the domestic dog. While the word "jackal" has historically been used for many small canids, in modern use it most commonly refers to three species: the closely related black-backed jackal and side-striped jackal of sub-Saharan Africa, and the golden jackal of south-central Eurasia, which is more closely related to other members of the genus Canis. Jackals and coyotes (sometimes called the "American jackal"[1]) are opportunistic omnivores, predators of small to medium-sized animals and proficient scavengers
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Eurasian Lynx
The Eurasian lynx
Eurasian lynx
( Lynx
Lynx
lynx) is a medium-sized wild cat native to Siberia, Central, Eastern, and Southern Asia, Northern, Central and Eastern Europe. It has been listed as Least Concern
Least Concern
on the IUCN
IUCN
Red List since 2008 as it is widely distributed, and most populations are considered stable
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Shrub
A shrub or bush is a small to medium-sized woody plant. Unlike herbs, shrubs have persistent woody stems above the ground. They are distinguished from trees by their multiple stems and shorter height, and are usually under 6 m (20 ft) tall.[1] Plants of many species may grow either into shrubs or trees, depending on their growing conditions
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Fox
Foxes are small-to-medium-sized, omnivorous mammals belonging to several genera of the family Canidae. Foxes have a flattened skull, upright triangular ears, a pointed, slightly upturned snout, and a long bushy tail (or brush). Twelve species belong to the monophyletic group of Vulpes
Vulpes
genus of "true foxes". Approximately another 25 current or extinct species are always or sometimes called foxes; these foxes are either part of the paraphyletic group of the South American foxes, or of the outlying group, which consists of bat-eared fox, gray fox, and island fox.[1] Foxes live on every continent except Antarctica. By far the most common and widespread species of fox is the red fox ( Vulpes
Vulpes
vulpes) with about 47 recognized subspecies.[2] The global distribution of foxes, together with their widespread reputation for cunning, has contributed to their prominence in popular culture and folklore in many societies around the world
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