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Whitley Bomber
The Armstrong Whitworth A.W.38 Whitley was one of three British twin-engined, front line medium bomber types that were in service with the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) at the outbreak of the Second World War. Alongside the Vickers Wellington
Vickers Wellington
and the Handley Page Hampden, the Whitley was developed during the mid-1930s according to Air Ministry Specification B.3/34, which it was subsequently selected to meet. In 1937, the Whitley formally entered into RAF squadron service; it was the first of the three medium bombers to be introduced. Following the outbreak of war in September 1939, the Whitley participated in the first RAF bombing raid upon German territory and remained an integral part of the early British bomber offensive
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Medium Bomber
A medium bomber is a military bomber aircraft designed to operate with medium-sized bombloads over medium range distances; the name serves to distinguish this type from larger heavy bombers and smaller light bombers. The term was used prior to and during World War II, based on available parameters of engine and aeronautical technology for bomber aircraft designs at that time. After the war, medium bombers were replaced in world air forces by more advanced and capable aircraft.Contents1 History 2 Medium bombers 3 See also 4 Notes and referencesHistory[edit] In the early 1930s many air forces were looking to modernize their existing bomber aircraft fleets, which frequently consisted of older biplanes. The new designs were typically twin-engined monoplanes, often of all-metal construction, and optimized for high enough performance and speed to help evade rapidly evolving fighter aircraft designs of the time
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Corrugated Galvanised Iron
Corrugated galvanised iron
Corrugated galvanised iron
or steel (colloquially corrugated iron (near universal), wriggly tin (taken from UK military
UK military
slang), pailing (in Caribbean English), corrugated sheet metal (in North America) and occasionally abbreviated CGI) is a building material composed of sheets of hot-dip galvanised mild steel, cold-rolled to produce a linear corrugated pattern in them. Although it is still popularly called "iron" in the UK, the material used is actually steel, and only surviving vintage sheets may actually be made up of iron. The corrugations increase the bending strength of the sheet in the direction perpendicular to the corrugations, but not parallel to them. Normally each sheet is manufactured longer in its strong direction. CGI is lightweight and easily transported. It was and still is widely used especially in rural and military buildings such as sheds and water tanks
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Armstrong Siddeley Tiger
The Armstrong Siddeley Tiger
Siddeley Tiger
was a British 14-cylinder air-cooled aircraft radial engine developed by Armstrong Siddeley
Armstrong Siddeley
in the 1930s from their Jaguar engine. The engine was built in a number of different versions but performance and dimensions stayed relatively unchanged
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Radial Engine
The radial engine is a reciprocating type internal combustion engine configuration in which the cylinders "radiate" outward from a central crankcase like the spokes of a wheel. It resembles a stylized star when viewed from the front, and is called a "star engine" (German Sternmotor, French moteur en étoile, Japanese hoshigata enjin, Italian Motore Stellare) in some languages
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Variable-pitch Propeller
A controllable-pitch propeller (CPP) or variable-pitch propeller is a type of propeller with blades that can be rotated around their long axis to change the blade pitch. Reversible propellers—those where the pitch can be set to negative values—can also create reverse thrust for braking or going backwards without the need to change the direction of shaft revolution.Contents1 Aircraft 2 Ships 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksAircraft[edit]One of a C-130J Super Hercules' 6 bladed Dowty Rotol
Dowty Rotol
R391 composite controllable- and reversible-pitch propellers.A Hamilton Standard
Hamilton Standard
variable-pitch propeller on a 1943 model Stinson V77 ReliantPropellers whose blade pitch could be adjusted while the aircraft was on the ground were used by a number of early aviation pioneers,[1] including A. V. Roe and Louis Breguet. In 1919 L. E
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De Havilland
De Havilland
De Havilland
Aircraft Company Limited /dəˈhævɪlənd/ was a British aviation manufacturer established in late 1920 by Geoffrey de Havilland at Stag Lane Aerodrome
Stag Lane Aerodrome
Edgware
Edgware
on the outskirts of north London. Operations were later moved to Hatfield in Hertfordshire. Known for its innovation, de Havilland were responsible for a number of important aircraft, including the Moth biplane which revolutionised general aviation in the 1920s, the 1930s Fox Moth, the first commercial transport able to operate without government subsidy,[citation needed] the wooden World War II Mosquito light bomber, and the passenger jet service pioneering Comet. The De Havilland
De Havilland
company became a member of the Hawker Siddeley
Hawker Siddeley
group in 1960, but lost its separate identity in 1963
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Flap (aircraft)
Flaps are a type of high-lift device used to increase the lift of an aircraft wing at a given airspeed. Flaps are usually mounted on the wing trailing edges of a fixed-wing aircraft. Flaps are used to lower the minimum speed at which the aircraft can be safely flown, and to increase the angle of descent for landing. Flaps also cause an increase in drag, so they are retracted when not needed. Extending the wing flaps increases the camber or curvature of the wing, raising the maximum lift coefficient or the upper limit to the lift a wing can generate. This allows the aircraft to generate the required lift at a lower speed, reducing the stalling speed of the aircraft, and therefore also the minimum speed at which the aircraft will safely maintain flight. The increase in camber also increases the wing drag, which can be beneficial during approach and landing, because it slows the aircraft
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Monoplane
A monoplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with a single main wing plane, in contrast to a biplane or other multiplane, each of which has multiple planes. A monoplane has inherently the highest efficiency and lowest drag of any wing configuration and is the simplest to build
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Angle Of Incidence (aerodynamics)
On fixed-wing aircraft, the angle of incidence (sometimes referred to as the mounting angle[1]) is the angle between the chord line of the wing where the wing is mounted to the fuselage, and a reference axis along the fuselage (often the direction of minimum drag, or where applicable, the longitudinal axis). The angle of incidence is fixed in the design of the aircraft, and with rare exceptions, cannot be varied in flight. The term can also be applied to horizontal surfaces in general (such as canards or horizontal stabilizers) for the angle they make relative the longitudinal axis of the fuselage. The figure to the right shows a side view of an airplane. The extended chord line of the wing root (red line) makes an angle with the longitudinal axis (roll axis) of the aircraft (blue line)
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Monocoque
Monocoque
Monocoque
(/ˈmɒnəˌkɒk, -ˌkoʊk/), also structural skin, is a structural system where loads are supported through an object's external skin, similar to an egg shell. The word monocoque is a French term for "single shell" or (of boats) "single hull".[1] A true monocoque carries both tensile and compressive forces within the skin and can be recognised by the absence of a load carrying internal frame. By contrast, a semi-monocoque is a hybrid combining a tensile stressed skin and a compressive structure made up of longerons and ribs or frames.[2] Other semi-monocoques, not to be confused with true monocoques, include vehicle unibodies, which tend to be composites, and inflatable shells or balloon tanks, both of which are pressure stabilised
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Fuselage
The fuselage (/ˈfjuːzəlɑːʒ/; from the French fuselé "spindle-shaped") is an aircraft's main body section. It holds crew, passengers, and cargo. In single-engine aircraft it will usually contain an engine, as well, although in some amphibious aircraft the single engine is mounted on a pylon attached to the fuselage, which in turn is used as a floating hull
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Alloy
An alloy is a combination of metals or of a metal and another element. Alloys are defined by a metallic bonding character.[1] An alloy may be a solid solution of metal elements (a single phase) or a mixture of metallic phases (two or more solutions). Intermetallic compounds are alloys with a defined stoichiometry and crystal structure. Zintl phases are also sometimes considered alloys depending on bond types (see also: Van Arkel-Ketelaar triangle
Van Arkel-Ketelaar triangle
for information on classifying bonding in binary compounds). Alloys are used in a wide variety of applications. In some cases, a combination of metals may reduce the overall cost of the material while preserving important properties. In other cases, the combination of metals imparts synergistic properties to the constituent metal elements such as corrosion resistance or mechanical strength
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Coventry Ordnance Works
Coventry
Coventry
Ordnance Works was a British manufacturer of heavy guns particularly naval artillery jointly owned by Cammell Laird
Cammell Laird
& Co of Sheffield and Birkenhead, Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company of Govan, Glasgow and John Brown & Company of Clydebank and Sheffield. Its core operations were from a 60-acre site in Stoney Stanton Road in the English city of Coventry, Warwickshire. At the end of 1918 it became a principal constituent of a brand new enterprise English Electric
English Electric
Company Limited
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Biplane
A biplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with two main wings stacked one above the other. The first powered, controlled aeroplane to fly, the Wright Flyer, used a biplane wing arrangement, as did many aircraft in the early years of aviation. While a biplane wing structure has a structural advantage over a monoplane, it produces more drag than a similar unbraced or cantilever monoplane wing. Improved structural techniques, better materials and the quest for greater speed made the biplane configuration obsolete for most purposes by the late 1930s. Biplanes offer several advantages over conventional cantilever monoplane designs: they permit lighter wing structures, low wing loading and smaller span for a given wing area
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Coventry Airport
Coventry
Coventry
Airport (IATA: CVT, ICAO: EGBE) is located 3 NM (5.6 km; 3.5 mi)[1] south southeast of Coventry
Coventry
city centre, in the village of Baginton, Warwickshire, England. The airport is operated by Coventry
Coventry
Airport Limited, and has a CAA Ordinary Licence (Number P902) that allows flights for the public transport of passengers or for flying instruction as authorised by the licensee, Coventry
Coventry
Airport Limited.[3] Coventry
Coventry
Airport is currently undergoing transition to a general aviation aerodrome offering a flight information service. This is expected to become fully active in late spring 2018
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