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White Motor
Coordinates: 41°31′58″N 81°38′06″W / 41.532842°N 81.635034°W / 41.532842; -81.635034This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)White Motor CompanyIndustry Automotive, DefenseFate AcquiredSuccessor VolvoFounded 1900Founder Thomas WhiteDefunct 1980Headquarters Cleveland, Ohio, United StatesProducts Vehicles Automotive partsThe White Motor Company
White Motor Company
was an American automobile, truck, bus and agricultural tractor manufacturer from 1900 until 1980. The company also produced bicycles, roller skates, automatic lathes, and sewing machines. Before World War II, the company was based in Cleveland, Ohio. White Diesel Engine Division in Springfield, Ohio, manufactured diesel engine generators, which powered U.S
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Diesel Engine
The diesel engine (also known as a compression-ignition or CI engine), named after Rudolf Diesel, is an internal combustion engine in which ignition of the fuel which is injected into the combustion chamber is caused by the elevated temperature of the air in the cylinder due to mechanical compression (adiabatic compression). Diesel engines work by compressing only the air. This increases the air temperature inside the cylinder to such a high degree that atomised diesel fuel that is injected into the combustion chamber ignites spontaneously. This contrasts with spark-ignition engines such as a petrol engine (gasoline engine) or gas engine (using a gaseous fuel as opposed to petrol), which use a spark plug to ignite an air-fuel mixture. In diesel engines, glow plugs (combustion chamber pre-warmers) may be used to aid starting in cold weather, or when the engine uses a lower compression-ratio, or both
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Combat Direction Center
The Operations Room (also known as the Combat Information Center (CIC), or, under the British system, the Action Information Centre) is the tactical center of a warship or AWAC aircraft providing processed information for command and control of the near battlespace or 'area of operations'. Within other military commands, rooms serving similar functions are called by the similar "Command Information Center" or simply "Command center"; the number of different terms for spaces that serve much the same function may explain why the plain and generally non-descriptive "Operations Center" is a prevalent term.[citation needed] Regardless of the vessel or command locus, each CIC organizes and processes information into a form more convenient and usable by the commander in authority
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Texas Towers
The Texas
Texas
Towers were a set of three radar facilities off the eastern seaboard of the United States
United States
which were used for surveillance by the United States Air Force
United States Air Force
during the Cold War. Modeled on the offshore oil drilling platforms first employed off the Texas
Texas
coast, they were in operation from 1958-1963. After the collapse of one of the towers in 1961, the remaining towers were closed due to changes in threat perception and out of a concern for the safety of the crews.Contents1 Planning 2 Design 3 Installations 4 Operational history 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPlanning[edit] Upon re-formation of the Air Defense Command in 1951 to oversee the nation's developing surveillance radar network, there was concern that shore-based radars along the east coast provided insufficient warning time
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Vietnam Era
Vietnam Era is a term used by the United States
United States
Department of Veterans Affairs to classify veterans of the Vietnam War. Various departments of federal, state and local governments as well as private employers often give Vietnam Era veterans special consideration regarding employment and sometimes assign extra qualifying points. For VA purposes, in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations Chapter 38 Paragraph 3.2 (f), the Vietnam Era is "The period beginning on February 28, 1961 and ending on May 7, 1975, inclusive, in the case of a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period. The period beginning on August 5, 1964 and ended on May 7, 1975 inclusive, in all other cases." The U.S. Congress, U.S
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Top 100 Contractors Of The U.S. Federal Government
The Top 100 Contractors Report is a list developed annually by the U.S
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Fiscal Year
A fiscal year (or financial year, or sometimes budget year) is the period used by governments for accounting and budget purposes, which vary between countries. It is also used for financial reporting by business and other organizations. Laws in many jurisdictions require company financial reports to be prepared and published on an annual basis, but generally do not require the reporting period to align with the calendar year (1 January to 31 December). Taxation laws generally require accounting records to be maintained and taxes calculated on an annual basis, which usually corresponds to the fiscal year used for government purposes. The calculation of tax on an annual basis is especially relevant for direct taxaction, such as income tax. Many annual government fees—such as Council rates, licence fees, etc.—are also levied on a fiscal year basis, while others are charged on an anniversary basis. The "fiscal year end" (FYE) is the date that marks the end of the fiscal year
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Lansing, Michigan
Lansing /ˈlænsɪŋ/ is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Michigan. It is mostly in Ingham County, although portions of the city extend west into Eaton County and north into Clinton County. The 2010 Census placed the city's population at 114,297,[7] making it the fifth largest city in Michigan. The population of its Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) was 464,036, while the even larger Combined Statistical Area (CSA) population, which includes Shiawassee County, was 534,684. It was named the new state capital of Michigan
Michigan
in 1847, ten years after Michigan
Michigan
became a state. The Lansing Metropolitan Area, colloquially referred to as "Mid-Michigan", is an important center for educational, cultural, governmental, commercial, and industrial functions
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Spare Part
A spare part, spare, service part, repair part, or replacement part, is an interchangeable part that is kept in an inventory and used for the repair or replacement of failed units
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Cylinder Head
In an internal combustion engine, the cylinder head (often informally abbreviated to just head) sits above the cylinders on top of the cylinder block. It closes in the top of the cylinder, forming the combustion chamber. This joint is sealed by a head gasket. In most engines, the head also provides space for the passages that feed air and fuel to the cylinder, and that allow the exhaust to escape
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Gasoline Engine
Gasoline
Gasoline
(American English), or petrol (British English), is a transparent, petroleum-derived liquid that is used primarily as a fuel in spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It consists mostly of organic compounds obtained by the fractional distillation of petroleum, enhanced with a variety of additives. On average, a 42-gallon barrel of crude oil (159 L) yields about 19 US gallons (72 L) of gasoline when processed in an oil refinery, though this varies based on the crude oil source's assay. The characteristic of a particular gasoline blend to resist igniting too early (which causes knocking and reduces efficiency in reciprocating engines) is measured by its octane rating. Gasoline
Gasoline
is produced in several grades of octane rating
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Semi-Automatic Ground Environment
The Semi-Automatic Ground Environment
Semi-Automatic Ground Environment
(SAGE, a name selected to mean "wise") was a system of large computers and associated networking equipment that coordinated data from many radar sites and processed it to produce a single unified image of the airspace over a wide area. SAGE directed and controlled the NORAD
NORAD
response to a Soviet air attack, operating in this role from the late 1950s into the 1980s. Its enormous computers and huge displays remain a part of cold war lore, and a common prop in movies such as Dr. Strangelove
Dr. Strangelove
and Colossus. The processing power behind SAGE was supplied by the largest computer ever built, the AN/FSQ-7. Each SAGE Direction Center (DC) housed an FSQ-7 which occupied an entire floor, approximately 22,000 square feet not including supporting equipment
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Auto Accessories
This Automotive accessories category contains articles relating to non-essential automotive parts which embellish the look and feel of an automobile or add functionality. Multi-part technologies are addressed in the parent Category:Automotive technologies. Essential and/or typical automotive parts including some articles that concern parts that are not specifically or only found on automobiles but also on other vehicles are the domain of Category:Auto parts. Retailers and suppliers of essential and non-essential parts are found in Category:Auto parts suppliers and Category:Automotive part retailers, respectively.Subcategories This category has the following 4 subcategories, out of 4 total. C ► Convertible top suppliers‎ (12 P) E ► Automotive electronics‎ (4 C, 26 P) I ► In-car entertainment‎ (2 C, 34 P) W ► Automobile wheels‎ (10 P)Pages in category "Automotive accessories" The following 94 pages are in this category, out of 94 total
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Rollin H. White
Windsor T. White (1866–1958) was an American automobile developer. He produced the White steamer cars in 1900, and later expanded to trucks. These vehicles were used militarily during World War I. White, along with two of his brothers Rollin White and Walter, were inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame
Automotive Hall of Fame
in 1997. External links[edit] Windsor T. White at www.automotivehalloffame.orgThis article about an American businessperson born in the 1860s is a stub
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Superheated Steam
Superheated steam is a steam at a temperature higher than its vaporization (boiling) point at the absolute pressure where the temperature is measured. The steam can therefore cool (lose internal energy) by some amount, resulting in a lowering of its temperature without changing state (i.e., condensing) from a gas, to a mixture of saturated vapor and liquid. If saturated steam (a mixture of both gas and saturated vapor) is heated at constant pressure, its temperature will also remain constant as the vapor quality (think dryness, or percent saturated vapor) increases towards 100%, and becomes dry (i.e., no saturated liquid) saturated steam. Continued heat input will then "super" heat the dry saturated steam
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