HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

White Chuck Glacier
White Chuck Glacier
White Chuck Glacier
is located in the Glacier Peak Wilderness
Glacier Peak Wilderness
in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Washington and is 3.5 mi (5.6 km) south of Glacier Peak. The glacier is within Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and nearly touches the White River Glacier though they are separated by an arête off the Kololo Peaks.[2] White Chuck Glacier has retreated significantly since the end of the Little Ice Age. From about 1850 to 1930, the glacier thinned and by 1940, a fast rate of retreat commenced. By 1955, the glacier had three separate termini and by 2005, the northern terminus was gone. Several small proglacial lakes have been left behind by the retreating glacier
[...More...]

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
[...More...]

picture info

Glacier Peak Wilderness
Glacier Peak
Glacier Peak
Wilderness is a 566,057-acre (229,075 ha), 35-mile-long (56 km), 20-mile-wide (32 km) wilderness area located within portions of Chelan, Snohomish, and Skagit counties in the North Cascades
North Cascades
of Washington. The area lies within parts of Wenatchee National Forest
Wenatchee National Forest
and Mount Baker National Forest
Mount Baker National Forest
and is characterized by heavily forested stream courses, steep-sided valleys, and dramatic glacier-crowned peaks.[2] The dominant geologic feature of the area is 10,541-foot (3,213 m) Glacier
Glacier
Peak. It is the most remote major volcanic peak in the Cascade Range and has more active glaciers than any other place in the lower forty-eight states
[...More...]

picture info

U.S. State
A state is a constituent political entity of the United States. There are currently 50 states, which are bound together in a union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the United States federal government. Due to the shared sovereignty between each state and the federal government, Americans
Americans
are citizens of both the federal republic and of the state in which they reside.[3] State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons covered by certain types of court orders (e.g., paroled convicts and children of divorced spouses who are sharing custody)
[...More...]

picture info

Washington (state)
Washington (/ˈwɒʃɪŋtən/ (listen)), officially the State of Washington, is a state in the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region of the United States. Named for George Washington, the first president of the United States, the state was made out of the western part of the Washington Territory, which was ceded by Britain in 1846 in accordance with the Oregon Treaty
Oregon Treaty
in the settlement of the Oregon
Oregon
boundary dispute. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889. Olympia is the state capital; the state's largest city is Seattle. Washington is sometimes referred to as Washington State to distinguish it from Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. Washington is the 18th largest state, with an area of 71,362 square miles (184,827 km2), and the 13th most populous state, with more than 7.4 million people
[...More...]

picture info

Glacier Peak
Glacier Peak
Glacier Peak
or Dakobed (known in the Sauk-Suiattle dialect of the Lushootseed
Lushootseed
language as "Tda-ko-buh-ba" or "Takobia"[5]) is the most isolated of the five major stratovolcanoes (composite volcanoes) of the Cascade Volcanic Arc in the U.S state of Washington. Located in the Glacier Peak
Glacier Peak
Wilderness, the volcano is visible from the west in Seattle, and from the north in the higher areas of eastern suburbs of Vancouver such as Coquitlam
Coquitlam
and Port Coquitlam. The volcano is the fourth tallest peak in Washington state, and not as much is known about it compared to other volcanoes in the area. Local Native Americans have recognized Glacier Peak
Glacier Peak
and other Washington volcanoes in their histories and stories
[...More...]

picture info

White River Glacier (Washington)
White River Glacier is located in the Glacier Peak Wilderness
Glacier Peak Wilderness
in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Washington. The glacier is within Wenatchee National Forest and nearly touches Honeycomb and Suiattle Glaciers, separated from them by an arête off the Kololo Peaks at its uppermost reaches.[2] White River Glacier has retreated approximately 1,000 m (3,300 ft) since the end of the Little Ice Age around the year 1850.[3] See also[edit]List of glaciers in the United StatesReferences[edit]^ "White River Glacier". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-11-30.  ^ Glacier Peak East, WA (Map). TopoQwest (United States Geological Survey Maps). Retrieved 2012-11-30.  ^ Pelto, Mauri (2007). "Glacier Peak A Century Of Change". North Cascade Glacier Climate Project. Nichols College
[...More...]

picture info

Arête
An arête is a narrow ridge of rock which separates two valleys. It is typically formed when two glaciers erode parallel U-shaped valleys. Arêtes can also form when two glacial cirques erode headwards towards one another, although frequently this results in a saddle-shaped pass, called a col.[1] The edge is then sharpened by freeze-thaw weathering, and the slope on either side of the arete steepened through mass wasting events and the erosion of exposed, unstable rock.[2] The word ‘arête’ is actually French for edge or ridge; similar features in the Alps
Alps
are described with the German equivalent term Grat. Where three or more cirques meet, a pyramidal peak is created.Contents1 Cleaver 2 Examples 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksCleaver[edit] A cleaver is a type of arête that separates a unified flow of glacial ice from its uphill side into two glaciers flanking, and flowing parallel to, the ridge
[...More...]

picture info

Little Ice Age
The Little Ice Age
Little Ice Age
(LIA) was a period of cooling that occurred after the Medieval Warm Period.[1] Although it was not a true ice age, the term was introduced into scientific literature by François E
[...More...]

picture info

Terminal Moraine
A terminal moraine, also called end moraine, is a type of moraine that forms at the snout (edge) of a glacier, marking its maximum advance. At this point, debris that has accumulated by plucking and abrasion, and has been pushed by the front edge of the ice, is driven no further and instead is dumped in a heap. Because the glacier acts very much like a conveyor belt, the longer it stays in one place, the greater the amount of material that will be deposited. The moraine is left as the marking point of the terminal extent of the ice.[1] Examples[edit] Terminal moraines are one of the most prominent types of moraines in the Arctic
[...More...]

picture info

Proglacial Lake
In geology, a proglacial lake is a lake formed either by the damming action of a moraine during the retreat of a melting glacier, a glacial ice dam, or by meltwater trapped against an ice sheet due to isostatic depression of the crust around the ice.[1] At the end of the last ice age approximately 10,000 years ago, large proglacial lakes were a widespread feature in the northern hemisphere.Contents1 Morain-dammed 2 Ice-dammed 3 Retreating ice sheet 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyMorain-dammed[edit]Glacial action forming a cirque to become a tarn, upon meltingFurther information: Tarn (lake) The receding glaciers of the tropical Andes
Andes
have formed a number of proglacial lakes, especially in the Cordillera Blanca
Cordillera Blanca
of Peru, where 70% of all tropical glaciers are. Several such lakes have formed rapidly during the 20th century. These lakes may burst, creating a hazard for zones below
[...More...]

picture info

Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
[...More...]

picture info

United States Geological Survey
The United States
United States
Geological Survey (USGS, formerly simply Geological Survey) is a scientific agency of the United States
United States
government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility. The USGS is a bureau of the United States
United States
Department of the Interior; it is that department's sole scientific agency. The USGS employs approximately 8,670 people[1] and is headquartered in Reston, Virginia
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

List Of Glaciers In The United States
This is a list of glaciers existing in the United States, currently or in recent centuries. These glaciers are located in nine states, all in the Rocky Mountains or farther west. The southernmost named glacier among them is the Lilliput Glacier
Glacier
in Tulare County, east of the Central Valley of California. This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness
[...More...]

picture info

Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest
The Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest
Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest
in Washington is a National Forest extending more than 140 miles (230 km) along the western slopes of the Cascade Range
Cascade Range
from the Canada–US border to the northern boundary of Mount Rainier National Park. Administered by the United States
United States
Forest Service, the forest is headquartered in Everett.[4]Contents1 Visitation 2 Geography2.1 Mountains 2.2 Glaciers3 Conservation 4 References 5 External linksVisitation[edit] The Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest
Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest
covers (in descending order of forestland area) portions of Snohomish, Whatcom, Skagit, King, Pierce, and Kittitas counties. It has a total area of 1,724,229 acres (6,978 km2). The forest consists of four ranger districts
[...More...]

.