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Western Port
Western Port, commonly but unofficially known as Western Port
Western Port
Bay, is a large tidal bay in southern Victoria, Australia, opening into Bass Strait. It is the second largest bay in the state. Geographically, it is dominated by the two large islands; French Island and Phillip Island. Contrary to its name, it lies to the east of the larger Port Phillip, and is separated from it by the Mornington Peninsula. It is visited by Australian fur seals, whales and dolphins, as well as many migratory waders and seabirds
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Westernport, Maryland
Westernport is a town in Allegany County, Maryland, United States, along the Georges Creek Valley. It is part of the Cumberland, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,888 at the 2010 census.Contents1 History 2 Notable residents 3 Nearby communities 4 Geography4.1 Climate5 Demographics5.1 2010 census 5.2 2000 census6 ReferencesHistory[edit]St. Peter Catholic Church on Church St in January 2014Westernport's first settlement is identified on a French military map dating from 1758. The map is currently on display at École Militaire in Paris. The settlement at that time had no name
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Wader
Waders are birds commonly found along shorelines and mudflats that wade in order to forage for food (such as insects or crustaceans) in the mud or sand. They are called shorebirds in North America, where the term "wader" is used to refer to long-legged wading birds such as storks and herons. Waders are members of the order Charadriiformes, which includes gulls, auks and their allies. There are about 210[verification needed] species of wader, most of which live in wetland or coastal environments. Many species of Arctic and temperate regions are strongly migratory, but tropical birds are often resident, or move only in response to rainfall patterns
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of AustraliaFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Advance Australia
Australia
Fair"[N 1]Capital Canberra 35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest city SydneyNational language English[N 2]DemonymAustralian Aussie
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States And Territories Of Australia
Australia
Australia
(officially known as the Commonwealth of Australia) is a federation of six states, together with ten federal territories. The Australian mainland consists of five of the six federated states and three of the federal territories (the "internal" territories). The state of Tasmania
Tasmania
is an island about 200 kilometres (120 mi) south of the mainland. The remaining seven territories are classified for some purposes as "external" territories. Aside from the Australian Antarctic Territory, which is Australia's claim to part of Antarctica, Australia
Australia
is the world's sixth-largest country by total area. All states and the two largest internal territories are partially self-governing, as well as being represented in the federal parliament; the other territories are administered by the federal government
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Australian Fur Seal
The brown fur seal ( Arctocephalus
Arctocephalus
pusillus), also known as the Cape fur seal, South African fur seal and the Australian fur seal is a species of fur seal.Contents1 Description 2 Ecology 3 Behaviour3.1 Acoustic behavior 3.2 Breeding behaviour4 Human interactions 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] Fur seal
Fur seal
grooming itself at the Cape Cross
Cape Cross
Seal Reserve on the Skeleton CoastSkull of male brown fur sealThe brown fur seal is the largest and most robust fur seal. It has a large and broad head with a pointed snout that may be flat or upturned slightly.[2] They have external ear flaps (pinnae) and their whiskers (vibrissae) are long, and may extend backward past the pinnae, especially in adult males. The foreflippers are covered with sparse hair over about three-quarters of their length
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Whale
Whales are a widely distributed and diverse group of fully aquatic placental marine mammals. They are an informal grouping within the infraorder Cetacea, usually excluding dolphins and porpoises. Whales, dolphins and porpoises belong to the order Cetartiodactyla
Cetartiodactyla
with even-toed ungulates and their closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. The two parvorders of whales, baleen whales (Mysticeti) and toothed whales (Odontoceti), are thought to have split apart around 34 million years ago
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Dolphin
Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae
Platanistidae
(the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae
Iniidae
(the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae
Pontoporiidae
(the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla
Cetartiodactyla
with even-toed ungulates
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Bird Migration
Bird
Bird
migration is the regular seasonal movement, often north and south along a flyway, between breeding and wintering grounds. Many species of bird migrate. Migration carries high costs in predation and mortality, including from hunting by humans, and is driven primarily by availability of food. It occurs mainly in the northern hemisphere, where birds are funneled on to specific routes by natural barriers such as the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
or the Caribbean Sea. Migration of species such as storks, turtle doves, and swallows was recorded as many as 3,000 years ago by Ancient Greek authors, including Homer
Homer
and Aristotle, and in the Book of Job
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Seabird
Seabirds (also known as marine birds) are birds that are adapted to life within the marine environment. While seabirds vary greatly in lifestyle, behaviour and physiology, they often exhibit striking convergent evolution, as the same environmental problems and feeding niches have resulted in similar adaptations. The first seabirds evolved in the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period, and modern seabird families emerged in the Paleogene. In general, seabirds live longer, breed later and have fewer young than other birds do, but they invest a great deal of time in their young. Most species nest in colonies, which can vary in size from a few dozen birds to millions. Many species are famous for undertaking long annual migrations, crossing the equator or circumnavigating the Earth in some cases. They feed both at the ocean's surface and below it, and even feed on each other
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Tidal
Tides are the rise and fall of sea levels caused by the combined effects of the gravitational forces exerted by the Moon
Moon
and the Sun and the rotation of Earth. Tide
Tide
tables can be used to find the predicted times and amplitude (or "tidal range") of tides at any given locale. The predictions are influenced by many factors including the alignment of the Sun
Sun
and Moon, the phase and amplitude of the tide (pattern of tides in the deep ocean), the amphidromic systems of the oceans, and the shape of the coastline and near-shore bathymetry (see Timing). They are however only predictions, the actual time and height of the tide is affected by wind and atmospheric pressure. Some shorelines experience a semi-diurnal tide—two nearly equal high and low tides each day. Other locations experience a diurnal tide—only one high and low tide each day
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Ramsar Convention
English, French and Spanish www.ramsar.orgThe Ramsar Convention
Ramsar Convention
on Wetlands of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat is an international treaty for the conservation and sustainable use of wetlands.[1] It is also known as the Convention on Wetlands
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Whaleboat
A whaleboat or whaler is a type of open boat that is relatively narrow and pointed at both ends, enabling it to move either forwards or backwards equally well. It was originally developed for whaling, and later became popular for work along beaches, since it does not need to be turned around for beaching or refloating. The term "whaleboat" may be used informally of larger whalers, or of a boat used for whale watching.Contents1 Modern applications 2 Uses in war 3 Construction 4 Whaling 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksModern applications[edit] Today whaleboats are used as safety vessels aboard marine vessels. The United States Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard
has been using them since 1791. Their simple open structure allows for easy access and personnel loading in the event of an emergency. These whaleboats are now considered very important, and highly regimented safety vessels
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Sydney
Sydney
Sydney
(/ˈsɪdni/ ( listen))[7] is the state capital of New South Wales
Wales
and the most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[8] Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds the world's largest natural harbour and sprawls about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north and Macarthur to the south.[9] Sydney
Sydney
is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions
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Melbourne
Melbourne
Melbourne
(/ˈmɛlbərn/[8] locally [ˈmɛɫbn̩] ( listen))[9][10] is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian
Australian
state of Victoria, and the second-most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[1] The name "Melbourne" covers an urban agglomeration spanning 9,992.5 km2 (3,858.1 sq mi),[2] which comprises the broader metropolitan area, as well as being the common name for its city centre
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Botany Bay
Botany Bay, an open oceanic embayment,[2] is located in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 13 km (8 mi) south of the Sydney central business district. Its source is the confluence of the Georges River at Taren Point
Taren Point
and the Cooks River
Cooks River
at Kyeemagh which flows 10 km (6 mi) to the east before meeting its mouth, the Tasman Sea, midpoint between La Perouse and Kurnell. The total catchment area of the bay is approximately 55 km2 (21 sq mi). Despite its relative shallowness, the bay serves as greater metropolitan Sydney's main cargo seaport, located at Port Botany, with facilities managed by Sydney
Sydney
Ports Corporation. Two runways of Sydney
Sydney
Airport extend into the bay. Botany Bay
Botany Bay
National Park is located on the northern and southern headlands of the bay
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