HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South
West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South
West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South
is a four-year comprehensive public high school located in Princeton Junction in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, serving students in ninth through twelfth grades. The school is part of the West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School District, a regional school district serving students from West Windsor Township (in Mercer County) and Plainsboro Township (in Middlesex County). As of the 2015-16 school year, the school had an enrollment of 1,591 students and 109.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.5:1. There were 58 students (3.6% of enrollment) eligible for free lunch and 26 (1.6% of students) eligible for reduced-cost lunch.[1] The school offers several honors and Advanced Placement
Advanced Placement
(AP) courses in various subject areas
[...More...]

"West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

United States Department Of Education
The United States Department of Education
United States Department of Education
(ED or DoED), also referred to as the ED for (the) Education Department, is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government. It began operating on May 4, 1980, having been created after the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare was split into the Department of Education and the Department of Health and Human Services by the Department of Education Organization Act (Public Law 96-88), which President Jimmy Carter signed into law on October 17, 1979.[3] The Department of Education is administered by the United States Secretary of Education
[...More...]

"United States Department Of Education" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

ACT (test)
The ACT (/eɪ siː tiː/; originally an abbreviation of American College Testing)[10] is a standardized test used for college admissions in the United States. It was first introduced in November 1959 by University of Iowa
University of Iowa
professor Everett Franklin Lindquist as a competitor to the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).[11] It is currently administered by ACT, a nonprofit organization of the same name.[10] The ACT originally consisted of four tests: English, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Natural Sciences
[...More...]

"ACT (test)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

National Blue Ribbon Schools Program
The National Blue Ribbon Schools Program
National Blue Ribbon Schools Program
is a United States government program created in 1982 to honor schools that have achieved high levels of student achievement or made significant improvements in closing the achievement gap among student subgroups. One-third of all schools nominated in any state must serve student populations of at least 40% from disadvantaged backgrounds. More than 8,000 schools have been honored as National Blue Ribbon Schools since the program's founding in 1982.[1]Contents1 History 2 Criteria 3 Application procedure 4 Criticism 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] In 1981, then-Secretary of Education Terrel H. Bell commissioned a study of American education
[...More...]

"National Blue Ribbon Schools Program" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New Jersey
New Jersey
Jersey
is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the Northeastern United States. It is a peninsula, bordered on the north and east by the state of New York; on the east, southeast, and south by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west by the Delaware River
Delaware River
and Pennsylvania; and on the southwest by the Delaware Bay
Delaware Bay
and Delaware. New Jersey
Jersey
is the fourth-smallest state by area but the 11th-most populous, with 9 million residents as of 2017,[20] and the most densely populated of the 50 U.S. states
[...More...]

"New Jersey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

The Daily Beast
The Daily Beast is an American news and opinion website focused on politics and pop culture. In a 2015 interview, editor-in-chief John Avlon described The Beast's editorial approach: "We seek out scoops, scandals, and stories about secret worlds; we love confronting bullies, bigots, and hypocrites".[1]Contents1 History 2 Editorial stance 3 Format3.1 Popularity 3.2 Awards 3.3 Beast Books4 Controversies4.1 Plagiarism 4.2 Merger 4.3 Taliban Denouncement 4.4 Nico Hines' 2016 Olympics article 4.5 Trump support5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Daily Beast began publishing on October 6, 2008. The Beast's founding editor was Tina Brown, a former editor of Vanity Fair and The New Yorker as well as the short-lived Talk
Talk
magazine
[...More...]

"The Daily Beast" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Magnet School
In the U.S. education system, magnet schools are public schools with specialized courses or curricula. "Magnet" refers to how the schools draw students from across the normal boundaries defined by authorities (usually school boards) as school zones that feed into certain schools. There are magnet schools at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. In the United States, where education is decentralized, some magnet schools are established by school districts and draw only from the district, while others are set up by state governments and may draw from multiple districts. Other magnet programs are within comprehensive schools, as is the case with several "schools within a school". In large urban areas, several magnet schools with different specializations may be combined into a single "center", such as Skyline High School in Dallas. Other countries have similar types of schools, such as specialist schools in England
[...More...]

"Magnet School" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Newsweek
Newsweek
Newsweek
is an American weekly magazine founded in 1933. Between 2008 and 2012, Newsweek
Newsweek
underwent internal and external contractions designed to shift the magazine's focus and audience while improving its finances. Instead, losses accelerated: revenue dropped 38 percent from 2007 to 2009. The revenue declines prompted an August 2010 sale by owner The Washington Post Company
The Washington Post Company
to audio pioneer Sidney Harman—for a purchase price of one dollar and an assumption of the magazine's liabilities.[3][4] In November 2010, Newsweek
Newsweek
merged with the news and opinion website The Daily Beast, forming The Newsweek
Newsweek
Daily Beast Company, after negotiations between the owners of the two publications. Tina Brown, The Daily Beast's editor-in-chief, served as the editor of both publications
[...More...]

"Newsweek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

International Baccalaureate
The International Baccalaureate (IB), formerly known as the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), is an international educational foundation headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland
Switzerland
and founded in 1968.[1][2] It offers four educational programmes: the IB Diploma Programme and the IB Career-related Programme for students aged 16 to 19, the IB Middle Years Programme, designed for students aged 11 to 16, and the IB Primary Years Programme for children aged 3 to 12.[3] To teach these programmes, schools need to be authorized by the International Baccalaureate Organization. The organisation's name and logo were changed in 2007 to reflect a reorganisation
[...More...]

"International Baccalaureate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

SAT
The SAT
SAT
(/ˌɛsˌeɪˈtiː/ ess-ay-TEE) is a standardized test widely used for college admissions in the United States. Introduced in 1926, its name and scoring have changed several times; originally called the Scholastic Aptitude Test, it was later called the Scholastic Assessment Test, then the SAT
SAT
I: Reasoning Test, then the SAT Reasoning Test, and now, simply the SAT. The SAT
SAT
is owned, developed, and published by the College
College
Board, a private, non-profit organization in the United States. It is administered on behalf of the College Board
College Board
by the Educational Testing Service,[3] which until recently developed the SAT
SAT
as well.[4] The test is intended to assess students' readiness for college
[...More...]

"SAT" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Star-Ledger
The Star-Ledger
The Star-Ledger
is the largest circulated newspaper in the U.S. state of New Jersey
New Jersey
and is based in Newark
[...More...]

"The Star-Ledger" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
[...More...]

"The New York Times" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Washington Post
The Washington Post
The Washington Post
is an American daily newspaper. Published in Washington, D.C., it was founded on December 6, 1877.[7] Located in the capital city of the United States, the newspaper has a particular emphasis on national politics. The newspaper's slogan states, "Democracy dies in darkness". Daily editions are printed for the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. It is published as a broadsheet. The newspaper has won 47 Pulitzer Prizes. This includes six separate Pulitzers awarded in 2008, second only to The New York Times' seven awards in 2002 for the highest number ever awarded to a single newspaper in one year.[8] Post journalists have also received 18 Nieman Fellowships and 368 White House
White House
News Photographers Association awards
[...More...]

"The Washington Post" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

New Jersey Monthly
New Jersey
New Jersey
Monthly is a monthly glossy publication featuring issues of possible interest to residents of the United States state of New Jersey. The magazine was started in 1976.[2] It is based in Morristown.[2] In addition to articles of general interest, the publication features occasional special subject issues covering and ranking high schools, lawyers, doctors and municipalities. It is a member of the City and Regional Magazine Association
City and Regional Magazine Association
(CRMA).[3] References[edit]^ "eCirc for Consumer Magazines." Audit Bureau of Circulations. Retrieved April 28, 2012. ^ a b " New Jersey
New Jersey
Monthly". CRMA. Retrieved August 20, 2015.  ^ "CRMA Magazines". City and Regional Magazine Association. Archived from the original on May 31, 2010
[...More...]

"New Jersey Monthly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

High School Proficiency Assessment
The High School Proficiency Assessment (HSPA, pronounced "hess-pah" or sometimes just "H-S-P-A") is a standardized test administered by the New Jersey Department of Education
New Jersey Department of Education
to all New Jersey public high school students in March of their junior year. Together with the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJ ASK) administered in grades 3-8, the HSPA is part of a battery of tests used to assess student performance in New Jersey's public schools. The HSPA is administered over a course of three days simultaneously in all high schools throughout the state of New Jersey. The exam tests students' proficiency in a variety of academic subjects including mathematics and language arts literacy
[...More...]

"High School Proficiency Assessment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New Jersey Department Of Education
The New Jersey
New Jersey
Department of Education (NJ DOE) administers state and federal aid programs affecting more than 1.4 million public and non-public elementary and secondary school children in the state of New Jersey. The department is headquartered in the Judge Robert L. Carter Building in Trenton.[1] The Department is responsible for ensuring that local schools comply with state and federal laws and regulations. It also oversees pupil transportation services and directs education programs for adults and for persons who are handicapped, disadvantaged or foreign-born. The Department employs over 900 persons and had an appropriation of $59.2 million from the state budget in fiscal 2004-05. The budget provided for $25.5 million for education grants-in-aid and $8.9 billion for state aid to education
[...More...]

"New Jersey Department Of Education" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.