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West Virginia University
West Virginia
West Virginia
University (WVU) is a public, land-grant, space-grant, research-intensive university in Morgantown, West Virginia, United States. Its other campuses include the West Virginia
West Virginia
University Institute of Technology in Beckley and Potomac State College of West Virginia University in Keyser; and a second clinical campus for the University's medical and dental schools at Charleston Area Medical Center in Charleston. WVU Extension Service provides outreach with offices in all of West Virginia's 55 counties
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Morrill Land-Grant Acts
The Morrill Land-Grant Acts
Morrill Land-Grant Acts
are United States
United States
statutes that allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges in U.S. states
U.S. states
using the proceeds of federal land sales. The Morrill Act of 1862 (7 U.S.C. § 301 et seq.) was enacted during the American Civil War and the Morrill Act of 1890 (the Agricultural College Act of 1890 (26 Stat. 417, 7 U.S.C. § 321 et seq.)) expanded this model.Contents1 Passage of original bill 2 Land-grant colleges 3 Expansion 4 Agricultural experiment stations and cooperative extension service 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPassage of original bill[edit]Justin Smith MorrillFor 20 years prior to the first introduction of the bill in 1857, there was a political movement calling for the creation of agriculture colleges
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Seth Thomas (clockmaker)
Seth Thomas (1785 – 1859) was an American clockmaker and a pioneer of mass production at his Seth Thomas Clock Company.Contents1 Biography 2 Death 3 Legacy 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Thomas was born in Wolcott, Connecticut
Wolcott, Connecticut
in 1785. He was apprenticed as a carpenter and joiner, and worked building houses and barns. He started in the clock business in 1807, working for clockmaker Eli Terry.[1] Thomas formed a clock-making partnership in Plymouth, Connecticut
Connecticut
with Eli Terry
Eli Terry
and Silas Hoadley
Silas Hoadley
as Terry, Thomas & Hoadley.[1][2] In 1810, he bought Terry's clock business, making tall clocks with wooden movements, though he chose to sell his partnership in 1812, moving in 1813 to Plymouth Hollow, Connecticut, where he set up a factory to make metal-movement clocks. In 1817, he added shelf and mantel clocks
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act
The Morrill Land-Grant Acts
Morrill Land-Grant Acts
are United States
United States
statutes that allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges in U.S. states
U.S. states
using the proceeds of federal land sales. The Morrill Act of 1862 (7 U.S.C. § 301 et seq.) was enacted during the American Civil War and the Morrill Act of 1890 (the Agricultural College Act of 1890 (26 Stat. 417, 7 U.S.C. § 321 et seq.)) expanded this model.Contents1 Passage of original bill 2 Land-grant colleges 3 Expansion 4 Agricultural experiment stations and cooperative extension service 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPassage of original bill[edit]Justin Smith MorrillFor 20 years prior to the first introduction of the bill in 1857, there was a political movement calling for the creation of agriculture colleges
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USA Today
USA Today
USA Today
is an internationally distributed American daily, middle-market newspaper that serves as the flagship publication of its owner, the Gannett Company. Founded by Al Neuharth on September 15, 1982, it operates from Gannett's corporate headquarters on Jones Branch Drive, in McLean, Virginia.[3] It is printed at 37 sites across the United States and at five additional sites internationally
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Truman Scholar
The Harry S. Truman Scholarship is a highly competitive federal scholarship granted to U.S. college juniors for demonstrated leadership potential and a commitment to public service. The scholarship, in the amount of $30,000, is to go towards a graduate education. Congress created the scholarship in 1975 as a living memorial to the 33rd president of the United States. Instead of a statue, the Truman Scholarship is the official federal memorial to its namesake president
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Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship
The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship
Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship
and Excellence in Education Program was established by the United States Congress
United States Congress
in 1986 in honor of former United States Senator
United States Senator
and 1964 presidential candidate Barry Goldwater. Its goal is to provide a continuing source of highly qualified scientists, mathematicians, and engineers by awarding scholarships to college students who intend to pursue careers in these fields. The Scholarship—the most prestigious undergraduate scholarship given in the natural sciences, engineering and mathematics—is awarded annually to about 300 college sophomores and juniors nationwide
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Rhodes Scholarship
The Rhodes Scholarship, named after the Anglo-South African mining magnate and politician Cecil John Rhodes, is an international postgraduate award for students to study at the University of Oxford.[1] It is widely considered to be one of the world's most prestigious scholarships.[2] Established in 1902, it was the first large-scale programme of international scholarships,[3] inspiring the creation of a great many other awards across the globe (such as the Fulbright
Fulbright
program, Marshall Scholarship, and the Gates Cambridge Scholarship). As elaborated on in his will, Cecil Rhodes' go
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Board Of Governors
A board of directors is a recognized group of people who jointly oversee the activities of an organization, which can be either a for-profit business, nonprofit organization, or a government agency. Such a board's powers, duties, and responsibilities are determined by government regulations (including the jurisdiction's corporations law) and the organization's own constitution and bylaws. These authorities may specify the number of members of the board, how they are to be chosen, and how often they are to meet. In an organization with voting members, the board is accountable to, and might be subordinate to, the organization's full membership, which usually vote for the members of the board. In a stock corporation, non-executive directors are voted for by the shareholders and the board is the highest authority in the management of the corporation. The board of directors appoints the chief executive officer of the corporation and sets out the overall strategic direction
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Doctoral University
The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education
Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education
is a framework for classifying colleges and universities in the United States. The framework primarily serves educational and research purposes, where it is often important to identify groups of roughly comparable institutions.[1] The classification includes all accredited, degree-granting colleges and universities in the United States that are represented in the National Center for Education Statistics Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). The Carnegie Classification was created by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education in 1970
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Second Epistle Of Peter
The Second Epistle
Epistle
of Peter, often referred to as Second Peter and written 2 Peter or in Roman numerals
Roman numerals
II Peter (especially in older references), is a book of the New Testament
New Testament
of the Bible, traditionally held to have been written by Saint Peter. Some scholars think Peter used an amanuensis, or secretary, to write the epistle.[1]Contents1 Composition 2 Canonical acceptance 3 Content 4 Audience 5 Outline 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External links9.1 Online translations of the epistle 9.2 OtherComposition[edit] See also: Authorship of the Petrine epistles According to the Epistle
Epistle
itself, it was composed by the Apostle Peter, an eyewitness to Jesus' ministry. It criticizes "false teachers" who distort the authentic, apostolic tradition, and predicts judgment for them
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School Colors
In the United States, school colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. Most schools have two colors, which are usually chosen to avoid conflicts with other schools[1] with which the school competes in sports and other activities. The colors are often worn to build morale among the teachers and pupils, and as an expression of school spirit.[2] School
School
colors are often found in pairs and rarely no more than trios, though some professional teams use up to four colors in a set. The choice of colors usually follows the rule of tincture from heraldry, but exceptions to this rule are known. Common primary colors include orange, purple, blue, red, and green. These colors are either paired with a color representing a metal (often black, brown, gray (or silver), white, or gold), or occasionally each other, such as orange/blue, red/green, or blue/yellow
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