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West Malvern
West Malvern
West Malvern
is a village and a civil parish, located on the west side of the north part of the Malvern Hills, at the western edge of Worcestershire, England. The village has become effectively a suburb of Malvern and is part of the area often referred to as The Malverns and locally administered by Malvern Hills
Malvern Hills
District Council as well as its own parish council. Due to its altitude (up to 250m above sea level) West Malvern
West Malvern
has panoramic views of the rolling Herefordshire
Herefordshire
countryside to the west.The village has a church (St. James) built in 1840, and a primary school (St. James Church of England
England
Primary)
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Worcestershire
Worcestershire (/ˈwʊstərʃər/ ( listen) WUUS-tər-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a county in the West Midlands of England. Between 1974 and 1998, it was merged with the neighbouring county of Herefordshire as Hereford and Worcester. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. Other major towns in the county include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The north-east of Worcestershire includes part of the industrial West Midlands; the rest of the county is largely rural
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James, Son Of Zebedee
James, son of Zebedee
Zebedee
(Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב‬, Yaʿqob, Greek: Ἰάκωβος ,Coptic: ⲓⲁⲕⲱⲃⲟⲥ; died 44 AD) was one of the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
of Jesus, and traditionally considered the first apostle to be martyred. He was a son of Zebedee
Zebedee
and Salome, and brother of John the Apostle. He is also called James the Greater or James the Great to distinguish him from James, son of Alphaeus
James, son of Alphaeus
and James the brother of Jesus
Jesus
(James the Just)
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List Of United Kingdom Parliament Constituencies
There are 650 constituencies in the United Kingdom, each electing a single Member of Parliament to the House of Commons ordinarily every five years. Voting
Voting
last took place in all 650 of those constituencies at the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election on 8 June 2017, and these results have been counted and verified. The election on 8 June 2017 elected 650 constituencies. 317 are held by the Conservative Party, 262 are held by the Labour Party, 35 are held by the Scottish National Party, 12 are held by the Liberal Democrats and 10 are held by the Democratic Unionist Party, with the balance held by various smaller parties, none of which have more than 8 seats, plus four unaffiliated MPs
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam–Bap Location names beginning with Bar
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Parish Councils In England
A parish council is a civil local authority found in England
England
and is the lowest tier of local government.[1] They are elected corporate bodies, have variable tax raising powers, and are responsible for areas known as civil parishes, serving in total 16 million people. A parish council serving a town may be called a town council, and a parish council serving a city is styled a city council; these bodies have the same powers, duties and status as a parish council. Parish and town councils vary enormously in size, activities and circumstances, representing populations ranging from less than 100 (small rural hamlets) to up to 70,000 (Weston-Super-Mare Town Council)
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Sea Level
Mean
Mean
sea level (MSL) (often shortened to sea level) is an average level of the surface of one or more of Earth's oceans from which heights such as elevations may be measured. MSL is a type of vertical datum – a standardised geodetic reference point – that is used, for example, as a chart datum in cartography and marine navigation, or, in aviation, as the standard sea level at which atmospheric pressure is measured to calibrate altitude and, consequently, aircraft flight levels. A common and relatively straightforward mean sea-level standard is the midpoint between a mean low and mean high tide at a particular location.[1] Sea
Sea
levels can be affected by many factors and are known to have varied greatly over geological time scales
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Herefordshire
Herefordshire
Herefordshire
(/ˈhɛrɪfərdʃər/) is a county in the West Midlands of England, governed by Herefordshire
Herefordshire
Council. It borders Shropshire to the north, Worcestershire
Worcestershire
to the east, Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
to the south-east, and the Welsh counties of Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
and Powys
Powys
to the west. Hereford
Hereford
is a cathedral city and is the county town; with a population of approximately 55,800 inhabitants it is also the largest settlement. The county is one of the most rural and sparsely populated in England, with a population density of 82/km² (212/sq mi)
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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List Of Members Of The European Parliament For The United Kingdom, 2014–19
Legislation1972 EC Act 1986 EC (Amendment) Act 1993 EC (Amendment) Act 1998 EC (Amendment) Act 2002 EC (Amendment) Act 2008 EU (Amendment) Act 2011 EU ActEuropean Parliament Elections1979 1984 1989 1994 1999 2004 2009 20141973 delegation 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8thWithdrawal2004–05 EU Bill 2013–14 EU (Referendum) Bill 2015–16 EU membership renegotiation 2015 EU Referendum Act 2016 EU (Referendum) Act (Gibraltar)2016 EU membership referendumCauses Endorsements Issues Opinion pollingCampaignsOrganisations advocating and campaigning for a referendumPeople's Pledge Labour for a ReferendumLeave Vote Leave
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Roget's Thesaurus
Roget's Thesaurus
Thesaurus
is a widely used English-language thesaurus, created in 1805 by Peter Mark Roget
Peter Mark Roget
(1779–1869), British physician, natural theologian and lexicographer. It was released to the public on 29 April 1852.[1] The original edition had 15,000 words, and each new edition has been larger.[2] The Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum houses the original manuscript in its collection.[2] The name "Roget" is trademarked in parts of the world, such as the United Kingdom.[3] By itself, it is not protected in the United States, where use of the name "Roget" in the title of a thesaurus does not necessarily indicate any relationship to Roget directly; it has come to be seen as a generic thesaurus name.[4] Roget described his thesaurus in the foreword to the first edition:It is now nearly fifty years since I first projected a system of verbal classification similar to that on which the present work is founded
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Music Festival
A music festival is a community event oriented towards live performances of singing and instrument playing that is often presented with a theme such as musical genre (e.g., blues, folk, jazz, classical music), nationality, or locality of musicians, or holiday. Some festivals are focused on women’s music. They are commonly held outdoors, with tents or roofed temporary stages for the performers. Often music festivals host other attractions such as food and merchandise vending, dance, crafts, performance art, and social or cultural activities. At music festivals associated with charitable causes, there may be information about social or political issues. Many festivals are annual, or repeat at some other interval. Some, including many rock festivals, are held only once. Some festivals are organized as for-profit concerts and others are benefits for a specific charitable cause
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The Theatre Of Small Convenience
The Theatre of Small Convenience was a theatre in Malvern, Worcestershire, England. In 2002 it entered the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's smallest commercial theatre, seating up to 12 people.[1] It is less than half the size of the previous record holder, the Piccolo Theatre in Hamburg, Germany.[2][3] The theatre closed on 25 February 2017 and the future of the building is currently unknown.[4]The stage during a puppet showThe theatre was located in Edith Walk, Great Malvern. Local puppeteer Dennis Neale started work on the theatre in 1997,[2] opening for the first show in November 1999.[5] The theatre's name comes from the building's original purpose – it was converted from a derelict Victorian gentlemen's public convenience
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Saint-Céneri-le-Gérei
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Saint-Céneri-le-Gérei
Saint-Céneri-le-Gérei
is a commune in the Orne
Orne
department in north-western France. It lies on the River Sarthe
River Sarthe
13 km (8.1 mi) from Alençon, the chef-lieu of the department, and some 200 km (120 mi) west of Paris.Contents1 History 2 Economy 3 Transport 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The place is named for Serenicus (or Genericus), an Italian hermit who lived here during the 8th century. When he died, a monastery was built, later destroyed by the Vikings
Vikings
in 903
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