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Wes Fesler
Wesley Eugene Fesler (June 29, 1908 – July 30, 1989) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player and coach of football and basketball. He was a three-sport athlete at Ohio State University
Ohio State University
and a consensus first-team selection to the College Football All-America Team three straight years (1928–1930). Fesler was later the head football coach at Wesleyan University
Wesleyan University
(1941–1942), the University of Pittsburgh (1946), Ohio State (1947–1950), and the University of Minnesota (1951–1953), compiling a career record of 41–40–8. He was also the head basketball coach at Harvard University (1933–1941), Wesleyan (1941–1944) and Princeton University (1945–1946), tallying a mark of 78–139
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American Football
American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada[citation needed] and also known as gridiron,[nb 1] is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal
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Fullback (American Football)
A fullback (FB) is a position in the offensive backfield in American and Canadian football, and is one of the two running back positions along with the halfback. Typically, fullbacks are larger than halfbacks and in most offensive schemes their duties are split between power running, pass catching, and blocking for both the quarterback and the other running back.[1] Many great runners in the history of American football
American football
have been fullbacks, including Jim Brown, Marion Motley, Jim Taylor, Franco Harris, Larry Csonka, John Riggins, Christian Okoye, and Levi Jackson. However, many of these runners would retroactively be labeled as halfbacks, due to their position as the primary ball carrier; they were primarily listed as fullbacks due to their size and did not often perform the run-blocking duties expected of modern fullbacks
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Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
is a limited-contact sport played on a rectangular court. While most often played as a team sport with five players on each side, three-on-three, two-on-two, and one-on-one competitions are also common. The objective is to shoot a basketball (approximately 9.4 inches (24 cm) in diameter) through a hoop 18 inches (46 cm) in diameter and 10 feet (3.048 m) high that is mounted to a backboard at each end of the court. The game was invented in 1891 by Dr. James Naismith. A team can score a field goal by shooting the ball through the basket being defended by the opposition team during regular play. A field goal scores three points for the shooting team if the player shoots from behind the three-point line, and two points if shot from in front of the line. A team can also score via free throws, which are worth one point, after the other team is assessed with certain fouls
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University Of Minnesota
The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (often referred to as The University of Minnesota, Minnesota, the U of M, UMN, or simply the U) is a public research university in Minneapolis
Minneapolis
and Saint Paul, Minnesota. The Minneapolis
Minneapolis
and St. Paul campuses are approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) apart, and the Saint Paul campus is actually in neighboring Falcon Heights.[7] It is the oldest and largest campus within the University of Minnesota system
University of Minnesota system
and has the sixth-largest main campus student body in the United States, with 51,147 students in 2013–14
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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Princeton University
Princeton University
Princeton University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Princeton, New Jersey
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Pi Kappa Alpha
Pi Kappa Alpha
Pi Kappa Alpha
(ΠΚΑ) or Pike is a college fraternity founded at the University of Virginia
University of Virginia
in 1868
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Phi Beta Kappa
The Phi Beta Kappa Society
Phi Beta Kappa Society
(ΦΒΚ) is the oldest honor society for the liberal arts and sciences in the United States
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Varsity Letter
A varsity letter (or monogram) is an award earned in the United States for excellence in school activities. A varsity letter signifies that its winner was a qualified varsity team member, awarded after a certain standard was met.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Variations and application 4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] The award letter is usually made in the colors and initials representing the school that the recipient attends. The letter patch is primarily constructed of chenille and felt materials. Standard sizes range from 4 inches (102 mm) to 8 inches (203 mm). While 4 inches (102 mm) and 5 inches (127 mm) usually denote Junior Varsity achievements, 6 inches (152 mm) to 8 inches (203 mm) would denote full (Senior) Varsity
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All-America
An All-America team is a hypothetical American sports team composed of outstanding amateur players. These players are broadly considered by media and other relevant commentators as the best players in a particular sport, of a specific season, for each team position. Such athletes at the high school and college level are given the honorific title and typically referred to as "All-American athletes" or simply "All-Americans".Contents1 Term usage1.1 Other uses2 Collegiate sports2.1 Archery 2.2 Baseball 2.3 Basketball 2.4 Cross country running 2.5 Football 2.6 Golf 2.7 Gymnastics 2.8 Ice hockey 2.9 Lacrosse 2.10 Rowing 2.11 Rugby union 2.12 Soccer 2.13 Swimming and diving 2.14 Tennis 2.15 Track and field 2.16 Volleyball 2.17 Wrestling3 High school
High school
sports 4 See also 5 ReferencesTerm usage[edit] As of 2009, the term is used in U.S
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Grantland Rice
Henry Grantland
Grantland
Rice (November 1, 1880 - July 13, 1954) was an early 20th-century American sportswriter known for his elegant prose. His writing was published in newspapers around the country and broadcast on the radio.Contents1 Early years 2 Sportswriter 3 Quotations 4 Legacy 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly years[edit] Grantland
Grantland
Rice was born in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, the son of Bolling Hendon Rice, a cotton dealer,[1] and his wife, Mary Beulah (Grantland) Rice.[2] His grandfather Major H. W
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College Football All-America Team
The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions
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College Football
College football
College football
is American football
American football
played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football
Canadian football
played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football
American football
rules first gained popularity in the United States. Unlike most other sports in North America, no minor league farm organizations exist in American or Canadian football. Therefore, college football is generally considered to be the second tier of American football
American football
in the United States and Canadian football
Canadian football
in Canada; one step ahead of high school competition, and one step below professional competition
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Photographer
A photographer (the Greek φῶς (phos), meaning "light", and γραφή (graphê), meaning "drawing, writing", together meaning "drawing with light")[1] is a person who makes photographs.Contents1 Duties and Types of Photographers1.1 Image gallery2 Selling photographs 3 Photo sharing 4 References 5 External linksDuties and Types of Photographers[edit]An English photographer in his studio, in the 1850s.As in other arts, the definitions of amateur and professional are not entirely categorical. A professional photographer is likely to take photographs for a session and image purchase fee, by salary or through the display, resale or use of those photographs
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Harold Eugene Edgerton
Harold Eugene "Doc" Edgerton also known as Papa Flash (April 6, 1903 – January 4, 1990) was a professor of electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[1] He is largely credited with transforming the stroboscope from an obscure laboratory instrument into a common device
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