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Weorgoran
The WEORGORAN (Old English :   "people of the winding river ") were a people of Saxon England
Saxon England
, a precursor of the minor kingdom of Hwicce . The Weorgoran were centered on Worcester
Worcester
( Weorgoran ceaster). They were probably (though not certainly) West Saxons and occupied the area some time after the defeat of the Britons at the Battle of Dyrham
Battle of Dyrham
in 577. The settlement was elevated to a bishopric in 680. REFERENCES * ^ Lambert, Tim. "A Brief History of Worcester" at The World History Encyclopedia. * ^ Lambert, Tim
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Anglican Diocese Of Worcester
The DIOCESE OF WORCESTER forms part of the Church of England (Anglican ) Province of Canterbury in England
England
. The diocese was founded around 679 by St Theodore of Canterbury at Worcester to minister to the kingdom of the Hwicce , one of the many Anglo Saxon petty-kingdoms of that time. The original borders of the diocese are believed to be based on those of that ancient kingdom. Covering an area of 671 square miles (1,740 km2) it has parishes in: * the County of Worcestershire
Worcestershire
* the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley * northern Gloucestershire * urban villages along the edge of the south-east of the Metropolitan Borough of Wolverhampton * the Metropolitan Borough of Sandwell Currently the diocese has 190 parishes with 281 churches and 163 stipendiary clergy
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Britons (historical)
The BRITONS, also known as CELTIC BRITONS or ANCIENT BRITONS, were Celtic people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the British Iron Age into the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
, at which point their culture and language diverged. They spoke the Common Brittonic language, the ancestor to the modern Brittonic languages
Brittonic languages
. The earliest evidence for the Britons and their language in historical sources dates to the Iron Age. After the Roman conquest of Britain in the 1st century, a Romano-British culture
Romano-British culture
emerged, and Latin and British Vulgar Latin coexisted with Brittonic. During and after the Roman era, the Britons lived throughout Britain
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Dudley
DUDLEY (/ˈdʌdli/ ( listen )) is a large town in the West Midlands of England, 6 miles (9.7 km) south-east of Wolverhampton
Wolverhampton
and 10.5 miles (16.9 km) north-west of Birmingham
Birmingham
. The town is the administrative centre of the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley and in 2011 had a population of 79,379. The Metropolitan Borough, which includes the towns of Stourbridge
Stourbridge
and Halesowen
Halesowen
, had a population of 312,900
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Duddeston
DUDDESTON is an inner-city area of the Nechells ward of central Birmingham
Birmingham
, England
England
. It was part of the Birmingham
Birmingham
Duddeston constituency until that ceased to exist in 1950. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 History * 2.1 Notable people * 3 Transport * 4 References ETYMOLOGYThe name Duddeston comes from Dud's Town, with Dud being the Saxon proprietor, Lord of Dudley who probably had a seat in Duddeston. It was speculated that Duddeston came from Dudda's tun but nothing is known of Dudda. HISTORY Duddeston is first mentioned in a charter granted to Wulfget the Thane by Eadgar, King of the Angles in 963
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Bristol
URBAN Chris Skidmore (Con) Jack Lopresti (Con) AREA • CITY AND COUNTY 40 sq mi (110 km2) ELEVATION 36 ft (11 m) POPULATION (2017) • CITY AND COUNTY 454,200 (Ranked 10th district and 43rd ceremonial county ) • DENSITY 10,080/sq mi (3,892/km2) • URBAN 617,000 (2,011 ONS estimate ) • METRO 1,006,600 (LUZ 2,009) • ETHNICITY * 84.0% white (77.9% white British) * 6.0% black * 5.5% Asian * 3.6% mixed-race * 0.3% Arab * 0.6% other DEMONYM(S) Bristolian TIME ZONE
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Old English Language
OLD ENGLISH (Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc) or ANGLO-SAXON is the earliest historical form of the English language
English language
, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland
Scotland
in the early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
. It was brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid 5th century, and the first Old English
Old English
literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman Conquest
Norman Conquest
of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman , a relative of French . This is regarded as marking the end of the Old English
Old English
era, as during this period the English language was heavily influenced by Anglo-Norman, developing into a phase known now as Middle English
Middle English

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Battle Of Dyrham
The BATTLE OF DEORHAM (or DYRHAM) was a decisive military encounter between the West Saxons and the Britons of the West Country in 577. The battle, which was a major victory for the Wessex forces led by Ceawlin and his son, Cuthwine , resulted in the capture of the Brythonic cities of Glevum (Gloucester ), Corinium Dobunnorum (Cirencester ) and Aquae Sulis (Bath ). It also led to the permanent cultural and ethnic separation of Dumnonia (Devon and Cornwall ) from Wales . The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is the only source that carries a mention of the battle. Although it gives few details, it describes it as a major engagement. The location of the Deorham is Hinton Hill near to Dyrham in South Gloucestershire
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Saxon England
ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND was early medieval England
England
, existing from the 5th to the 11th century from the end of Roman Britain
Roman Britain
until the Norman conquest in 1066. It consisted of various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until 927 when it was united as the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
by King Æthelstan (r. 927–939). It became part of the North Sea Empire of Cnut the Great , a personal union between England, Denmark
Denmark
and Norway
Norway
in the 11th century. The Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
were the members of Germanic-speaking groups who migrated to the southern half of the island from continental Europe , and their cultural descendants
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Anglo-Saxons
The ANGLO-SAXONS were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century . They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe
Europe
, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest . The early Anglo-Saxon period includes the creation of an English nation , with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds . During this period, Christianity was re-established and there was a flowering of literature and language. Charters and law were also established
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River Severn
The RIVER SEVERN (Welsh : Afon Hafren , Latin
Latin
: Sabrina) is a river in the United Kingdom. At about 220 miles (354 km), it is usually considered to be the longest in the UK. It rises at an altitude of 2,001 feet (610 m) on Plynlimon , close to the Ceredigion
Ceredigion
/Powys border near Llanidloes , in the Cambrian Mountains
Cambrian Mountains
of mid Wales
Wales
. It then flows through Shropshire
Shropshire
, Worcestershire
Worcestershire
and Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
, with the county towns of Shrewsbury
Shrewsbury
, Worcester
Worcester
and Gloucester
Gloucester
on its banks
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Cilternsæte
The CILTERNSæTE (or CILTERN SæTNA) were a tribe that occupied the Chilterns , probably in the 6th century AD. It is unclear whether they were native Britons, Anglians , or West Saxons . Mortimer Wheeler noted the absence of Anglo-Saxon evidence from the Chilterns and suggested the area was a British enclave into the 6th Century, possibly the remnants of a Sub-Roman polity encompassing an area that included London, Colchester, and St. Albans. Earlier, J. Brownbill had suggested they were one branch of the West Saxons. The Tribal Hidage valued their territory at 4,000 hides . This assessment is relatively large compared with those of some other tribes of central England. Although the Tribal Hidage suggests the tribe gave its name to the hills, the truth must be the reverse since the toponym is of Brittonic origin. Eilert Ekwall suggested that "Chiltern" is possibly related to the ethnic name "Celt" ("Celtæ" in early Celtic)
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Arlingham
ARLINGHAM is a village and civil parish in the Stroud District
Stroud District
of Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
, England. The 2001 Census
Census
recorded a parish population of 410, increasing to 459 at the 2011 census (226 males, 233 females with 176 Households). The parish contains the hamlets of Milton End, Overton and Priding The next parish to the east is Fretherne with Saul . CONTENTS * 1 Geography * 2 Architecture * 3 Government * 4 History * 5 References * 6 Further reading * 7 External links GEOGRAPHY Arlingham
Arlingham
lies at the western end of the horseshoe loop of the River Severn , known as the "Horseshoe Bend", looking across the water to Newnham on Severn and the Forest of Dean
Forest of Dean

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Husmerae
The HUSMERAE were a tribe or clan in Anglo-Saxon England , possibly forming an early settlement of the Hwicce subkingdom. The Husmerae settled on the banks of the River Stour, prior to 736. They probably took their name from Usmere, a pool on the boundary of Wolverley whose name in preserved in Ismere House in Churchill, Worcestershire . The tribe is mentioned only in the Ismere Diploma of 734, and subsequent charters relating to the same property until 964, when Usmere occurs on the boundary of Cookley in Wolverley. This charter was for the foundation of a coenubium (minster ). That minster was probably at Kidderminster, quite probably occupying the site of the parish church there
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Brahhingas
The BRAHHINGAS or BRAHINGAS were a tribe or clan of Anglo-Saxon England whose territory was centred on the settlement of Braughing in modern-day Hertfordshire . The name of the tribe means "the people of Brahha", with Brahha likely to have been either a leader of the tribe or a real or mythical ancestor. The tribe are first recorded in an charter dating from the 830s or 840s, and their regio or administrative territory is likely to have included the later parishes of Reed , Barkway , Barley , Nuthampstead , Buckland , Wyddial , Anstey , Throcking , Aspenden , Layston , Great Hormead , Little Hormead , Westmill and Standon , in the valleys of the River Rib and River Quin . The Brahhingas were originally within the area of the Middle Saxons but fell under the control of the East Saxons at an early date. The area remained part of the Archdeaconry of Middlesex even after it became part of Hertfordshire
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Gaini
The GAINI were an Anglo-Saxon tribe which occupied part of the kingdom of Mercia
Mercia
. Map of Anglo-Saxon England The Gaini
Gaini
are only recorded in Asser
Asser
's life of King Alfred the Great , written in 893, which stated that in 868, before he became king, Alfred married Ealhswith , daughter of Æthelred, known as Mucel , ealdorman of the Gaini. Mucel witnessed Mercian charters between 814 and 866, with two subscribing in the 830s and 840s. They may be father and son, with the later one being Ealhswith's father. The older was probably "Mucel son of Esne" recorded in a Mercian charter of 836. Esne attested Mercian charters in the late eighth and early ninth centuries. Ealhswith's father attested two West Saxon charters in 868, the year his daughter married Alfred
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