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Wei Guan
Wei Guan (220–291), courtesy name Boyu, was an official of the state of Cao Wei
Cao Wei
in the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period of China. He served under the Jin dynasty (265–420)
Jin dynasty (265–420)
after the end of the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Career during the Jin dynasty 3 See also 4 ReferencesEarly life and career[edit] Wei Guan was from Anyi County (安邑縣), Hedong Commandery (河東郡), which is located west of present-day Xia County, Shanxi. His father Wei Ji (衛覬) was a high-ranking Wei official and marquis, who died in 229. Wei Guan inherited his father's peerage, and when he grew older became an official. Throughout the years, he became known for his capability and was continuously promoted
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Three Ducal Ministers
The Three Ducal Ministers
Three Ducal Ministers
(Chinese: 三公; pinyin: Sāngōng), also translated as the Three Dukes, Three Excellencies, or the Three Lords, was the collective name for the three highest officials in ancient China.Contents1 Overview 2 Rank 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References5.1 Citations 5.2 SourcesOverview[edit] Each minister was responsible for different areas of government, but the boundaries were often blurred. Together, the Three Ducal Ministers were the emperor's closest advisors
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Chinese Surname
Chinese surnames are used by Han Chinese
Han Chinese
and Sinicized ethnic groups in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Brunei, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam
Vietnam
and among overseas Chinese communities. In ancient times two types of surnames existed, namely xing (Chinese: 姓; pinyin: xìng) or clan names, and shi (Chinese: 氏; pinyin: shì) or lineage names. Chinese family names are patrilineal, passed from father to children (in adoption, the adoptee usually also takes the same surname). Women do not normally change their surnames upon marriage, except in places with more Western influences such as Hong Kong. Traditionally Chinese surnames have been exogamous.[1][2] The colloquial expressions laobaixing (老百姓; lit. "old hundred surnames") and bǎixìng (百姓, lit
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Conquest Of Shu By Wei
The Conquest of Shu by Wei
Conquest of Shu by Wei
was a military campaign launched by the state of Cao Wei
Cao Wei
against its rival Shu Han
Shu Han
in 263 during the Three Kingdoms period of China. The campaign culminated in the fall of Shu and the tripartite equilibrium maintained in China
China
for over 40 years since the end of the Eastern Han dynasty
Eastern Han dynasty
in 220
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Shu Han
Shu or Shu Han
Shu Han
(221–263) was one of the three major states that competed for supremacy over China
China
in the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period (220–280). The state was based in the area around present-day Sichuan
Sichuan
and Chongqing, which was historically known as "Shu" after an earlier state in Sichuan
Sichuan
named Shu
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Sima Zhao
Sima
Sima
or SIMA
SIMA
may refer to:Contents1 People1.1 Chinese family names 1.2 Iranian first names 1.3 Slavic last names2 Places 3 Other 4 See alsoPeople[edit]
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List Of People Of The Three Kingdoms
The following are lists of people significant to the Three Kingdoms period (220–280) of Chinese history. Their names are sorted in alphabetical order. Fictional characters in the 14th-century historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
and those found in other cultural references to the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
are listed separately in List of fictional people of the Three Kingdoms.v t eList of people of the Three KingdomsA B C D E F G H J K L M N O P Q R S T W X Y ZNotes[edit] The states of Cao Wei, Shu Han, and Eastern Wu
Eastern Wu
were officially established in 220, 221, and 229 respectively. Therefore, certain people in the list who died before these years have their respective lords' names, in place of either of the three states, listed in the allegiance column
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Three Kingdoms
The Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
(AD 184/220–280) was the tripartite division of China
China
between the states of Wei (魏), Shu (蜀), and Wu (吳).[1] It started with the dissolution of the Han dynasty
Han dynasty
and was followed by the Jin dynasty. The term "Three Kingdoms" is something of a misnomer, since each state was eventually headed not by a king, but by an emperor who claimed suzerainty over all China.[2] Nevertheless, the term "Three Kingdoms" has become standard among sinologists
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Developmental Disability
Developmental disability is a diverse group of chronic conditions that are due to mental or physical impairments. Developmental disabilities cause individuals living with them many difficulties in certain areas of life, especially in "language, mobility, learning, self-help, and independent living".[1] Developmental disabilities can be detected early on, and do persist throughout an individual's lifespan. Developmental disability that affects all areas of a child's development is sometimes referred to as global developmental delay. Most common developmental disabilities: Down syndrome
Down syndrome
is a condition in which people are born with an extra copy of chromosome 21. Normally, a person is born with two copies of chromosome 21. However, if they are born with Down syndrome, they have an extra copy of this chromosome
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Wei (surname)
Wei (魏, 韋, 衛, 尉, 隗) is a Chinese surname. It was ranked the 122nd most common Chinese surname
Chinese surname
in 2006. Wei (魏) is the name used for the Kingdom of Wei.Contents1 Notable people surnamed Wei (魏) 2 Notable people surnamed Wei (衛/卫) 3 Notable people surnamed Wei (尉) 4 Notable people surnamed Wei (韋/韦) 5 Notable people surnamed Wei (蔿) 6 See alsoNotable people surnamed Wei (魏)[edit]Wei character in ancient script on top, standard script at bottomDuring the Zhou Dynasty, Wei (state)
Wei (state)
(魏) the Ji family acquired the surname Wei (魏). During the Northern Wei
Northern Wei
(北魏), Xiaowen family got the surname Wei with the state name. During the Ming Dynasty, Gao (高) and Li (李) family change surname to Wei
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Fang Xuanling
Fang Qiao (579–648), courtesy name Xuanling, better known as Fang Xuanling,[a] posthumously known as Duke Wenzhao of Liang, was a Chinese statesman and writer who served as a chancellor under Emperor Taizong in the early Tang dynasty. He was the lead editor of the historical record Book of Jin (covering the history of the Jin dynasty (265–420)) and one of the most celebrated Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
chancellors. He and his colleague, Du Ruhui, were often described as role models for chancellors in imperial China.Contents1 During the Sui dynasty 2 During Emperor Gaozu's reign 3 During Emperor Taizong's reign 4 Notes 5 ReferencesDuring the Sui dynasty[edit] Fang Xuanling
Fang Xuanling
was born in 579, shortly before the founding of the Sui dynasty in 581, during Sui's predecessor state, Northern Zhou
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Chinese Name
Chinese personal names are names used by those from mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora
Chinese diaspora
overseas. Due to China's historical dominance of East Asian culture, many names used in Korea and Vietnam are adaptations of Chinese names, or have historical roots in Chinese, with appropriate adaptation to accommodate linguistic differences. Modern Chinese names consist of a surname known as xing (姓, xìng), which comes first and is usually but not always monosyllabic, followed by a personal name called ming (名, míng), which is nearly always mono- or disyllabic
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Posthumous Name
A posthumous name is an honorary name given to royalty, nobles, and sometimes others, in East Asia
East Asia
after the person's death, and is used almost exclusively instead of one's personal name or other official titles during his life
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Courtesy Name
A courtesy name (Chinese: 字, zi), also known as a style name,[1] is a name bestowed upon one at adulthood in addition to one's given name.[2] This practice is a tradition in East Asian cultures, including China, Japan, Korea
Korea
and Vietnam.[3] Formerly in China, the zi would replace a male's given name when he turned twenty, as a symbol of adulthood and respect.[citation needed] It could be given either by the parents or by the first personal teacher on the first day of family school. Females might substitute their given name for a zi upon marriage
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Shanxi
Shanxi
Shanxi
(Chinese: 山西; pinyin:  Shānxī; postal: Shansi) is a province of China, located in the North China
China
region. Its one-character abbreviation is "晋" (pinyin: Jìn), after the state of Jin that existed here during the Spring and Autumn period. The name Shanxi
Shanxi
means "West of the Mountains", a reference to the province's location west of the Taihang Mountains.[5] Shanxi
Shanxi
borders Hebei
Hebei
to the east, Henan
Henan
to the south, Shaanxi
Shaanxi
to the west, and Inner Mongolia to the north and is made up mainly of a plateau bounded partly by mountain ranges
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Xia County
Xia County or Xiaxian (Chinese: 夏县; Pinyin: Xià Xiàn) is a county in the northern province of Shanxi
Shanxi
in the People's Republic of China
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