HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Weaving
Weaving
Weaving
is a method of textile production in which two distinct sets of yarns or threads are interlaced at right angles to form a fabric or cloth. Other methods are knitting, crocheting, felting, and braiding or plaiting. The longitudinal threads are called the warp and the lateral threads are the weft or filling. ( Weft
Weft
or is an old English word meaning "that which is woven".[a]) The method in which these threads are inter-woven affects the characteristics of the cloth.[1] Cloth
Cloth
is usually woven on a loom, a device that holds the warp threads in place while filling threads are woven through them. A fabric band which meets this definition of cloth (warp threads with a weft thread winding between) can also be made using other methods, including tablet weaving, back-strap, or other techniques without looms.[2] The way the warp and filling threads interlace with each other is called the weave
[...More...]

"Weaving" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nile
The Nile
Nile
(Arabic: النيل‎, Egyptian Arabic en-Nīl, Standard Arabic an-Nīl; Coptic: ⲫⲓⲁⲣⲱ, P(h)iaro; Ancient Egyptian: Ḥ'pī and Jtrw; Biblical Hebrew: הַיְאוֹר‬, Ha-Ye'or or הַשִׁיחוֹר‬, Ha-Shiḥor) is a major north-flowing river in northeastern Africa, and is commonly regarded as the longest river in the world,[1] though some sources cite the Amazon River
[...More...]

"Nile" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

English (language)
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
[...More...]

"English (language)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Peru
Coordinates: 10°S 76°W / 10°S 76°W / -10; -76 Republic
Republic
of Peru República del Perú  (Spanish)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Firme y feliz por la unión" (Spanish) "Firm and Happy for the Union"Anthem: "Himno Nacional del Perú"  (Spanish) "National Anthem of Peru"National SealGran Sello del Estado  (Spanish) Great Seal of the StateLocation of  Peru  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital and largest city Lima 12°2.6′S 77°1.7′W / 12.0433°S 77.0283°W / -12.0433; -77.0283<
[...More...]

"Peru" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Graphical User Interface
The graphical user interface (GUI /ɡuːiː/), is a type of user interface that allows users to interact with electronic devices through graphical icons and visual indicators such as secondary notation, instead of text-based user interfaces, typed command labels or text navigation. GUIs were introduced in reaction to the perceived steep learning curve of command-line interfaces (CLIs),[1][2][3] which require commands to be typed on a computer keyboard. The actions in a GUI are usually performed through direct manipulation of the graphical elements.[4] Beyond computers, GUIs are used in many handheld mobile devices such as MP3
MP3
players, portable media players, gaming devices, smartphones and smaller household, office and industrial controls
[...More...]

"Graphical User Interface" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parallel (geometry)
In geometry, parallel lines are lines in a plane which do not meet; that is, two lines in a plane that do not intersect or touch each other at any point are said to be parallel. By extension, a line and a plane, or two planes, in three-dimensional Euclidean space
Euclidean space
that do not share a point are said to be parallel. However, two lines in three-dimensional space which do not meet must be in a common plane to be considered parallel; otherwise they are called skew lines. Parallel planes are planes in the same three-dimensional space that never meet. Parallel lines are the subject of Euclid's parallel postulate.[1] Parallelism is primarily a property of affine geometries and Euclidean geometry is a special instance of this type of geometry
[...More...]

"Parallel (geometry)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Perpendicular
In elementary geometry, the property of being perpendicular (perpendicularity) is the relationship between two lines which meet at a right angle (90 degrees). The property extends to other related geometric objects. A line is said to be perpendicular to another line if the two lines intersect at a right angle.[2] Explicitly, a first line is perpendicular to a second line if (1) the two lines meet; and (2) at the point of intersection the straight angle on one side of the first line is cut by the second line into two congruent angles. Perpendicularity can be shown to be symmetric, meaning if a first line is perpendicular to a second line, then the second line is also perpendicular to the first. For this reason, we may speak of two lines as being perpendicular (to each other) without specifying an order. Perpendicularity easily extends to segments and rays
[...More...]

"Perpendicular" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fayum
Faiyum[1] (Arabic: الفيوم‎ El Fayyūm  pronounced [elfæjˈjuːm]; Coptic:  ̀Ⲫⲓⲟⲙ or Ⲫⲓⲱⲙ Phiom or Phiōm) is a city in Middle Egypt. Located 100 kilometres (62 miles) southwest of Cairo, in the Faiyum
Faiyum
Oasis, it is the capital of the modern Faiyum
Faiyum
Governorate
[...More...]

"Fayum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flax
Flax
Flax
( Linum
Linum
usitatissimum), also known as common flax or linseed, is a member of the genus Linum
Linum
in the family Linaceae. It is a food and fiber crop cultivated in cooler regions of the world. The textiles made from flax are known in the Western countries as linen, and traditionally used for bed sheets, underclothes, and table linen. The oil is known as linseed oil. In addition to referring to the plant itself, the word "flax" may refer to the unspun fibers of the flax plant
[...More...]

"Flax" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dogon People
The Dogon are an ethnic group living in the central plateau region of Mali, in West Africa, south of the Niger
Niger
bend, near the city of Bandiagara, in the Mopti
Mopti
region. The population numbers between 400,000 and 800,000.[1] They speak the Dogon languages, which are considered to constitute an independent branch of the Niger–Congo language family.[2] The Dogon are best known for their religious traditions, their mask dances, wooden sculpture and their architecture
[...More...]

"Dogon People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Picanol
The Picanol Group specializes in development, production and sales of weaving machines and technology for the textile industry. The company is based in Belgium, with production plants in Asia, Europe and the United States. Brand names produced by Picanol include Proferro, PsiControl Mechatronics, Melotte, GTP Accessories, Steel Heddle, Burcklé and Te Strake Textile. The Picanol Group has been listed on Euronext Brussels since 1966 (ticker: PIC) and is included in the NextPrime Index.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Sources 4 External linksHistory[edit] The company was founded in 1936 by the Belgian industrialist Charles Steverlynck as Weefautomaten Picañol NV. In 1966 the company was listed on the Brussels Stock Exchange. At the ITMA exhibition in Paris in 1971, Picañol exhibited the MDC, the world’s first electronically controlled flying shuttle machine. In 1989 the foundry division was split off from the other activities and made into a separate company, Proferro NV
[...More...]

"Picanol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dolní Věstonice (archaeology)
Dolní Věstonice
Dolní Věstonice
(often without diacritics as Dolni Vestonice) refers to an Upper Paleolithic
Upper Paleolithic
archaeological site near the village of Dolní Věstonice, Moravia
Moravia
in the Czech Republic,on the base of Děvín Mountain 549 metres (1,801 ft), dating to approximately 26,000 BP, as supported by radiocarbon dating. The site is unique in that it has been a particularly abundant source of prehistoric artifacts (especially art) dating from the Gravettian
Gravettian
period, which spanned roughly 27,000 to 20,000 B.C
[...More...]

"Dolní Věstonice (archaeology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Çatalhöyük
Çatalhöyük
Çatalhöyük
(Turkish pronunciation: [tʃaˈtaɫhøjyk]; also Çatal Höyük and Çatal Hüyük; from Turkish çatal "fork" + höyük "mound") was a very large Neolithic
Neolithic
and Chalcolithic proto-city settlement in southern Anatolia, which existed from approximately 7500 BC to 5700 BC, and flourished around 7000 BC.[1] In July 2012, it was inscribed as a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site.[2] Çatalhöyük
Çatalhöyük
is located overlooking the Konya
Konya
Plain, southeast of the present-day city of Konya
Konya
(ancient Iconium) in Turkey, approximately 140 km (87 mi) from the twin-coned volcano of Mount Hasan. The eastern settlement forms a mound which would have risen about 20 m (66 ft) above the plain at the time of the latest Neolithic
Neolithic
occupation
[...More...]

"Çatalhöyük" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Guitarrero Cave
Guitarrero Cave
Cave
is located in the Callejón de Huaylas
Callejón de Huaylas
valley in Yungay Province, in the Ancash region
Ancash region
of Peru. The cave stands 50 m (160 ft) above Rio Santa
Rio Santa
and 2,580 m (8,460 ft) meters above sea level.[1]Contents1 Archeological findings1.1 Cultigens2 See also 3 Notes 4 ReferencesArcheological findings[edit] Guitarrero Cave
Cave
has evidence of human use around 8,000 BCE and possibly as early as 10,560 BCE.[2] A human's mandible and teeth found in the cave have been carbon dated to 10,610 BCE.[1] Above all that, there were a series of Archaic period campfires, dated between 8,500 and 7,000 BCE.[2] Wood, bone, antler and fiber cordage were among the artifacts that were recovered from the level, as well as willow leaf, tanged, lanceolate, and concave base Ichuna/Arcata projectile points
[...More...]

"Guitarrero Cave" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paleolithic
The Paleolithic
Paleolithic
or Palaeolithic /ˌpæliːəˈlɪθɪk/ is a period in human prehistory distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers c. 95% of human technological prehistory.[1] It extends from the earliest known use of stone tools by hominins c. 3.3 million years ago, to the end of the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
c. 11,650 cal BP.[2] The Paleolithic
Paleolithic
is followed in Europe by the Mesolithic, although the date of the transition varies geographically by several thousand years. During the Paleolithic, hominins grouped together in small societies such as bands, and subsisted by gathering plants and fishing, hunting or scavenging wild animals.[3] The Paleolithic
Paleolithic
is characterized by the use of knapped stone tools, although at the time humans also used wood and bone tools
[...More...]

"Paleolithic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Velveteen
Velveteen (or velveret) is a type of cloth made to imitate velvet. Normally cotton, the term is sometimes applied to a mixture of silk and cotton. Some velveteens are a kind of fustian, having a rib of velvet pile alternating with a plain depression. This fabric has a pile that is short (never more than 3 mm deep) and is closely set. It has a firm hand and a slightly sloping pile. Compared to true velvet, velveteen has greater body, does not drape as easily, and has less sheen.[1][2] The velveteen trade varies with the fashions that control the production of velvet. See also[edit]The Velveteen Rabbit VelourReferences[edit]  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Velveteen". Encyclopædia Britannica. 27 (11th ed.)
[...More...]

"Velveteen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.