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Wat Phra Si Rattana Mahathat
Wat Phra Si Rattana Mahathat
Wat Phra Si Rattana Mahathat
(Thai: วัดพระศรีรัตนมหาธาตุ; "Temple of Great Jewelled Reliquary"), colloquially referred to as Wat Yai (Thai: วัดใหญ่; "Big Temple"), is a Buddhist temple (wat) in Phitsanulok
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Thai Language
Thai,[3] Central Thai,[4] or Siamese,[5] is the national and official language of Thailand
Thailand
and the first language of the Thai people
Thai people
and the vast majority of Thai Chinese. It is a member of the Tai group of the Tai–Kadai language family. Over half of its words are borrowed from Pali, Sanskrit, Mon, and Old Khmer
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Ekathotsarot
Sanpet III (Thai: สรรเพชญ์ที่ 3) or Ekathotsarot (Thai: เอกาทศรถ;-1620) was the King of Ayutthaya from 1605 to 1620 and overlord of Lan Na
Lan Na
from 1605 to 1608/09 succeeding his brother Naresuan. His reign was mostly peaceful as Siam was then a powerful state through the conquests of Naresuan. It was also during his reign that foreigners of various origin began to fill the mercenary corps. In particular, the king had a regiment of professional Japanese guards under the command of Yamada Nagamasa.[1]:51 During Ekathotsarot's reign, the English first came to Siam in 1612.[1]:53[2]:242Contents1 The White Prince 2 The Second King 3 King of Siam3.1 Mission to Dutch Republic 3.2 Foreign Mercenaries 3.3 Prince Suthat4 Notes 5 ReferencesThe White Prince[edit] The White Prince was the son of Maha Thammarachathirat of Phitsanulok and Queen Wisutkasat
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History Of Thailand
Thai people, who originally lived in southwestern China, migrated into mainland Southeast Asia over a period of many centuries. The oldest known mention of their existence in the region by the exonym Siamese is in a 12th-century inscription at the Khmer temple complex of Angkor Wat in Cambodia, which refers to syam, or "dark brown", people.[1] "Siam" may have originated from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
śyāma "dark", referring to the relative skin colour of its native people.[2] Chinese: 暹羅; pinyin: Xiānluó was the name for the northern kingdom centred on Sukhothai and Sawankhalok, but to the Thai themselves, the name of the country has always been Mueang Thai.[3] The country's designation as Siam
Siam
by Westerners likely came from the Portuguese
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Borommakot
Borommakot[1] (Thai: บรมโกศ) or Borommarachathirat III (Thai: บรมราชาธิราชที่ 3) was the king of Ayutthaya from 1733 to 1758. His reign was the last blooming period of Ayutthaya as the kingdom would fall nine years after his death.[2]:68–69 "His reign of 25 years is important for being the last peaceful period of Ayudhya during which literature with the arts and crafts flurished." However, the king himself was known for "cruelty to people and animals alike," with seven of his sons meeting violent deaths.[2]:67–68Contents1 Ayutthya civil war 2 Accession to the bloodshed throne 3 Issue 4 NotesAyutthya civil war[edit] Prince Phon (Thai: พร) was the son of Phra Chao Suea. His elder brother, Prince Phet (เพชร), succeeded the throne as Thai Sa in 1708.[3]:277 Phon was then appointed as the Front Palace
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Chulalongkorn
Phra Bat Somdet Phra Poraminthra Maha Chulalongkorn
Chulalongkorn
Phra Chunla Chom Klao Chao Yu Hua (Thai: พระบาทสมเด็จพระปรมินทรมหาจุฬาลงกรณ์ พระจุลจอมเกล้าเจ้าอยู่หัว), or Rama V (20 September 1853 – 23 October 1910), was the fifth monarch of Siam
Siam
under the House of Chakri. He was known to the Siamese of his time as Phra Phuttha Chao Luang (พระพุทธเจ้าหลวง, the Royal Buddha)
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Borommaracha III
Somdet Phra Borommaracha Thirat III (Thai: สมเด็จพระบรมราชาธิราชที่ 3) was the king of Ayutthaya from 1488 to 1491. Formerly Prince Borommaracha, Borommaracha III was the son of Trailokanat. Prince Borommaracha served as Trailokanat’s regent in Ayutthaya during his father’s campaigns against Lanna
Lanna
in the north. Trailokanat died in 1488 and Prince Borommaracha succeeded his father. Upon ascension, he moved the capital back to Ayutthaya. The throne of Sukhothai at Pitsanulok, however, was succeeded by his brother Prince Chettathirat.[1]:71 His reign, however, was short. He sent Siamese armies to capture the Mon city of Tavoy
Tavoy
in 1491 and died the same year. He was succeeded by his brother Prince Chettathirat as Ramathibodi II.[2]:35 References[edit]^ Rajanubhab, D., 2001, Our Wars With the Burmese, Bangkok: White Lotus Co
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Bhumibol Adulyadej
Bhumibol Adulyadej
Bhumibol Adulyadej
(Thai: ภูมิพลอดุลยเดช; RTGS: Phumiphon Adunyadet; pronounced [pʰūː.mí.pʰōn ʔā.dūn.jā.dèːt] ( listen); see full title below; 5 December 1927 – 13 October 2016), conferred with the title King Bhumibol the Great in 1987,[1][2][3][4] was the ninth monarch of Thailand
Thailand
from the Chakri dynasty
Chakri dynasty
as Rama
Rama
IX
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Thai Temple Art And Architecture
Buddhist temples in Thailand
Buddhist temples in Thailand
are known as "wats", from the Pāḷi vāṭa, meaning an enclosure. A temple has an enclosing wall that divides it from the secular world.Contents1 Wat
Wat
architecture1.1 Phutthawat 1.2 Sangkhawat2 Temple elements2.1 Roof forms 2.2 Roof finials3 Popular temple icons 4 See also4.1 Depictions of the Buddha 4.2 Statues and ornamentation: deities, demons and mythical beings 4.3 Architectural elements 4.4 General5 References 6 Further reading 7 External links Wat
Wat
architecture[edit] Wat
Wat
Chiang Man, from left to right: Ubosot, Ho Trai and ChediThe kamphaeng kaeo (crystal wall) surrounding the ubosot at Wat Ratchabophit in Bangkok Wat
Wat
architecture has seen many changes in Thailand in the course of history
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Borommatrailokkanat
Borommatrailokkanat (Thai: บรมไตรโลกนาถ)[1][2][3] [4] or Trailok (1431–1488) was the king of the Ayutthaya Kingdom
Ayutthaya Kingdom
from 1448 to 1488. He was one of many monarchs who gained the epithet King of White Elephants (Thai: พระเจ้าช้างเผือก). He was the first Thai king to possess a "noble" or white elephant, which, according to Hindu belief, was a "glorious and happy sign".[5] He was also the first Thai king "to have in his veins the blood of both the kings of Ayudhya [sic] and the kings of Sukhot'ai [sic].[6] His reign was also known for a massive reforms of Thai bureaucracy and a successful campaign against Lan Na
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Ayutthaya Kingdom
Phitsanulok
Phitsanulok
(1463–1488) Ayutthaya (1488–1666) Lopburi
Lopburi
(1666–1688) Ayutthaya (1688–1767)Languages Ayutthayan ThaiReligion Majority:
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Rattanakosin Kingdom
The Rattanakosin Kingdom
Rattanakosin Kingdom
(Thai: อาณาจักรรัตนโกสินทร์, IPA: [āːnāːt͡ɕàk ráttanákōːsǐn]) is the fourth and present traditional centre of power in the history of Thailand
Thailand
(or Siam). It was founded in 1782 with the establishment of Bangkok
Bangkok
as the capital city. The maximum zone of influence of the Rattanakosin Kingdom
Rattanakosin Kingdom
included the vassal states of Cambodia, Laos, Burmese Shan States, and some Malay kingdoms. The kingdom was founded by King Rama I
King Rama I
(Phra Phutthayotfa Chulalok) of the Chakri Dynasty. The first half of this period was characterised by the consolidation of the kingdom's power and was punctuated by periodic conflicts with Burma, Vietnam
Vietnam
and Laos
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Vihara
Vihara
Vihara
(विहार, IAST: vihāra) generally refers to a Buddhist bhikkhu monastery. The concept is ancient and in early Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Pali
Pali
texts, it meant any arrangement of space or facilities for pleasure and entertainment.[2][3] The term evolved into an architectural concept wherein it refers to living quarters for monks with an open shared space or courtyard, particularly in Buddhism. The term is also found in Ajivika, Hindu and Jain monastic literature, usually referring to temporary refuge for wandering monks or nuns during the annual Indian monsoons.[2][4][5] Vihara
Vihara
or vihara hall has a more specific meaning in the study of Indian architecture, especially ancient Indian rock-cut architecture. Here it means a central hall, with small cells connected to it sometimes with beds carved from the stone
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Sukhothai Kingdom
The Kingdom of Sukhothai (Thai: สุโขทัย, pronounced [sù.kʰǒː.tʰāj]Soo-Ker Ty) was an early kingdom in the area around the city Sukhothai, in north central Thailand. The Kingdom existed from 1238
1238
until 1438
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Nakhon Thai District
Nakhon Thai (Thai: นครไทย, pronounced [ná(ʔ).kʰɔ̄ːn tʰāj]) is a district (amphoe) in the eastern part of Phitsanulok Province, central Thailand.Contents1 Geography 2 Administration2.1 Central administration 2.2 Local administration3 Temples 4 References 5 External linksGeography[edit] Neighboring districts are (from the southwest clockwise) Wang Thong, Chat Trakan of Phitsanulok Province, Na Haeo and Dan Sai of Loei Province and Khao Kho of Phetchabun Province. The Phu Hin Rong Kla National Park is in Nakhon Thai District. Nakhon Thai lies within the Nan Basin, which is part of the Chao Phraya Watershed
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Boromakot
Borommakot[1] (Thai: บรมโกศ) or Borommarachathirat III (Thai: บรมราชาธิราชที่ 3) was the king of Ayutthaya from 1733 to 1758. His reign was the last blooming period of Ayutthaya as the kingdom would fall nine years after his death.[2]:68–69 "His reign of 25 years is important for being the last peaceful period of Ayudhya during which literature with the arts and crafts flurished." However, the king himself was known for "cruelty to people and animals alike," with seven of his sons meeting violent deaths.[2]:67–68Contents1 Ayutthya civil war 2 Accession to the bloodshed throne 3 Issue 4 NotesAyutthya civil war[edit] Prince Phon (Thai: พร) was the son of Phra Chao Suea. His elder brother, Prince Phet (เพชร), succeeded the throne as Thai Sa in 1708.[3]:277 Phon was then appointed as the Front Palace
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