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Waste
Waste
Waste
(or wastes) are unwanted or unusable materials
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Awareness
Awareness is the ability to directly know and perceive, to feel, or to be cognizant of events. More broadly, it is the state of being conscious of something.Contents1 Concept 2 Self-awareness 3 Neuroscience3.1 Basic awareness 3.2 Basic interests 3.3 Changes in awareness4 Living systems view 5 Communications and information systems 6 Covert awareness 7 Other uses 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksConcept[edit] Awareness is a relative concept. Awareness may be focused on an internal state, such as a visceral feeling, or on external events by way of sensory perception
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Tamil Nadu
^# Jana Gana Mana
Jana Gana Mana
is the national anthem, while "Invocation to Tamil Mother" is the state song/anthem. ^† Established in 1773; Madras State was formed in 1950 and renamed as Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
on 14 January 1969[9] ^^ Tamil is the official language of the state. English is declared as an additional official language for communication purposes.[8]SymbolsEmblem Srivilliputhur
Srivilliputhur
Andal templeLanguageTamilSong"Invocation to Goddess Tamil"DanceBharathanattiyamAnimalNilgiri tahrBirdEmerald doveFlowerGloriosa lilyTreePalm treeSportKabaddi Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
(Tamil pronunciation: [t̪amiɻ n̪aːᶑu] ( listen) literally 'The Land of Tamils' or 'Tamil Country') is one of the 29 states of India. Its capital and largest city is Chennai
Chennai
(formerly known as Madras)
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Refusal (other)
Refusal is lack of agreement to perform a particular course of action. Refusal can also mean:A refusal can be indicated by the word no Refusal (horse), a concept in equestrian activities occurs when a horse will not jump or cross over an obstacle. Refusal of work Refusal to deal Refusal of medical assistance Refusal skills Driven to refusal, an engineering/surveying term used in pile-driving. Disulfiram, by the trade name RefusalSee also[edit]RefuseThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Refusal. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Education
Education
Education
is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include storytelling, discussion, teaching, training, and directed research. Education
Education
frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, but learners may also educate themselves.[1] Education
Education
can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational
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Methane Emissions
Global methane emissions are major part of the global greenhouse gas emissions. Methane in the atmosphere has a 100-year global warming potential of 34.[1]Contents1 Sources of atmospheric methane1.1 Anthropogenic 1.2 Natural sources2 By country 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksSources of atmospheric methane[edit]Diagram showing the main sources of methane (produced for the first global report on global methane emissions)This article is in a list format that may be better presented using prose. You can help by converting this article to prose, if appropriate. Editing help is available. (April 2017)Biogenic (b) methane is produced by microorganisms in a process called methanogenesis. Abiogenic (a) methane stored in rocks and soil stems from ancient biomass and the generation mechanisms are the not the same as for other fossil fuels. Anthropogenic[edit] Anthropogenic sources:[2][3][4]industrial agriculture (b), s.a
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Cost-effective
Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is a form of economic analysis that compares the relative costs and outcomes (effects) of different courses of action. Cost-effectiveness analysis is distinct from cost–benefit analysis, which assigns a monetary value to the measure of effect.[1] Cost-effectiveness analysis is often used in the field of health services, where it may be inappropriate to monetize health effect
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Inert Atmosphere
An inert gas is a gas which does not undergo chemical reactions under a set of given conditions. The noble gases often do not react with many substances[1], and were historically referred to as the inert gases. Inert gases are used generally to avoid unwanted chemical reactions degrading a sample. These undesirable chemical reactions are often oxidation and hydrolysis reactions with the oxygen and moisture in air. The term inert gas is context-dependent because several of the noble gases can be made to react under certain conditions. Purified argon and nitrogen gases are most commonly used as inert gases due to their high natural abundance (78% N2, 1% Ar in air) and low relative cost. Unlike noble gases, an inert gas is not necessarily elemental and is often a compound gas
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Urine
Urine
Urine
is a liquid by-product of metabolism in humans and in many animals. Urine
Urine
flows from the kidneys through the ureters to the urinary bladder. Urination
Urination
results in urine being excreted from the body through the urethra. The cellular metabolism generates many by-products which are rich in nitrogen and must be cleared from the bloodstream, such as urea, uric acid, and creatinine. These by-products are expelled from the body during urination, which is the primary method for excreting water-soluble chemicals from the body. A urinalysis can detect nitrogenous wastes of the mammalian body. Urine
Urine
has a role in the earth's nitrogen cycle. In balanced ecosystems urine fertilizes the soil and thus helps plants to grow. Therefore, urine can be used as a fertilizer. Some animals use it to mark their territories
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Decomposition
Decomposition
Decomposition
is the process by which organic substances are broken down into simpler matter. The process is a part of the nutrient cycle and is essential for recycling the finite matter that occupies physical space in the biosphere. Bodies of living organisms begin to decompose shortly after death. Animals, such as worms, also help decompose the organic materials. Organisms that do this are known as decomposers. Although no two organisms decompose in the same way, they all undergo the same sequential stages of decomposition. The science which studies decomposition is generally referred to as taphonomy from the Greek word taphos, meaning tomb. One can differentiate abiotic from biotic decomposition (biodegradation)
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Combustion
Combustion
Combustion
/kəmˈbʌs.tʃən/, or burning,[1] is a high-temperature exothermic redox chemical reaction between a fuel (the reductant) and an oxidant, usually atmospheric oxygen, that produces oxidized, often gaseous products, in a mixture termed as smoke. Combustion
Combustion
in a fire produces a flame, and the heat produced can make combustion self-sustaining. Combustion
Combustion
is often a complicated sequence of elementary radical reactions. Solid fuels, such as wood and coal, first undergo endothermic pyrolysis to produce gaseous fuels whose combustion then supplies the heat required to produce more of them. Combustion
Combustion
is often hot enough that light in the form of either glowing or a flame is produced. A simple example can be seen in the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen into water vapor, a reaction commonly used to fuel rocket engines
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Basel Convention On The Control Of Transboundary Movements Of Hazardous Wastes And Their Disposal
Convention may refer to:Treaty, an agreement in international law Convention (meeting), a large gathering of people who share a common interestFan convention, a gathering of fans of a particular media property or genre Gaming convention, centered on role-playing games, collectible card games, miniatures wargames, board games, video games, and the like Political convention, a formal gathering of people for political purposesTrade fair Convention (norm), a custom or tradition, a standard of presentation or conduct Bridge convention, a term in the game of bridge Convention (Paris Métro), a station on line 12 of the Paris Métro in the 15th arrondissement "The Convention" (The Office episode) "Convention" (Malcolm in the Middle episode)See also[edit]Conference (other) National Convention (other) ConvectionThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Convention. If an internal link led you here, you may wish t
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European Union
The European Union
European Union
(EU) is a political and economic union of 28 member states that are located primarily in Europe. It has an area of 4,475,757 km2 (1,728,099 sq mi), and an estimated population of over 510 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states
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Pulp And Paper
The pulp and paper industry comprises companies that use wood as raw material and produce pulp, paper, paperboard and other cellulose-based products. The industry is dominated by North American (United States and Canada), northern European (Finland, Sweden, and North-West Russia) and East Asian countries (such as East Siberian Russia, China, Japan, and South Korea). Australasia and Brazil also have significant pulp and paper enterprises. The industry also has a significant presence in a number of European countries including Germany, Portugal, Italy, the Netherlands and Poland
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Global Warming
Global warming, also referred to as climate change, is the observed century-scale rise in the average temperature of the Earth's climate system and its related effects.[1][2] Multiple lines of scientific evidence show that the climate system is warming.[3][4][5] Many of the observed changes since the 1950s are unprecedented in the instrumental temperature record which extends back to the mid-19th century, and in paleoclimate proxy records covering thousands of years.[6] In 2013, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate
Climate
Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report concluded that "It is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century."[7] The largest human influence has been the emission of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide
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Wasting
In medicine, wasting, also known as wasting syndrome, refers to the process by which a debilitating disease causes muscle and fat tissue to "waste" away. Wasting is sometimes referred to as "acute malnutrition" because it is believed that episodes of wasting have a short duration, in contrast to stunting, which is regarded as chronic malnutrition. According to the latest UN estimates, an estimated 52 million children under 5 years of age, or 8%, were wasted in 2011. The vast majority, about 70%, of the world's wasted children live in Asia, most in South-Central Asia.[1]Contents1 Causes 2 Classification 3 Treatment 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCauses[edit] Wasting can be caused by an extremely low energy intake (e.g., caused by famine), nutrient losses due to infection, or a combination of low intake and high loss. Infections and conditions associated with wasting include tuberculosis, chronic diarrhea, AIDS, and superior mesenteric artery syndrome
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