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Washington District, North Carolina
The Washington District of North Carolina
North Carolina
was in a remote area west of the Appalachian Mountains, officially existing for only a short period (November 1776 – November 1777), although it had been self-proclaimed and functioning as an independent governing entity since the spring of 1775.[1] The district was the bureaucratic successor to the Watauga Association, a group of Virginian settlers that colonized the area in 1769,[2] originally believing themselves to be in trans-Appalachian Virginia territory. When the settlement's application to be united with Virginia was denied, they asked North Carolina to annex the settlement, which occurred in November, 1776.[3] After the American Revolution, the now informal district saw a huge growth of the area it encompassed, eventually stretching to the Mississippi River
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Appalachian Mountains
The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
(/ˌæpəˈlæʃɪn, -ˈleɪtʃɪn/ ( listen);[note 1] French: les Appalaches), often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern North America. The Appalachians first formed roughly 480 million years ago during the Ordovician
Ordovician
Period. They once reached elevations similar to those of the Alps
Alps
and the Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
before experiencing natural erosion.[3][4] The Appalachian chain is a barrier to east-west travel, as it forms a series of alternating ridgelines and valleys oriented in opposition to most highways and railroads running east-west. Definitions vary on the precise boundaries of the Appalachians
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Autonomous Administrative Division
An autonomous administrative division (also referred to as an autonomous area, entity, unit, region, subdivision, or territory) is a subdivision or dependent territory of a country that has a degree of self-governance, or autonomy, from an external authority. Typically, it is either geographically distinct from the rest of the country or populated by a national minority. Decentralization
Decentralization
of self-governing powers and functions to such divisions is a way for a national government to try to increase democratic participation or administrative efficiency or to defuse internal conflicts. Countries that include autonomous areas may be federacies, federations, or confederations
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Self-proclaimed
Self proclaimed—or, in French, soi-disant—describes a legal title that is recognized by the declaring person but not necessarily by any recognized legal authority. It can be the status of a noble title or the status of a nation
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Cherokee
316,049 enrolled tribal members (Eastern Band: 13,000+, Cherokee
Cherokee
Nation: 288,749, United Keetoowah Band: 14,300)[1] 819,105 claimed Cherokee
Cherokee
ancestry in the 2010 Census[2]Regions with significant populations United States North Carolina
North Carolina
16,158 (0.2%)[3][3]   Oklahoma
Oklahoma
102,580 (2.7%)[3]LanguagesEnglish, CherokeeReligionChristianity, Kituhwa, Four Mothers Society,[4] Native American Church[5]This article contains Cherokee
Cherokee
syllabic characters
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Kingdom Of Great Britain
The Kingdom of Great Britain, officially called simply Great Britain,[1] was a sovereign state in western Europe from 1 May 1707 to 31 December 1800. The state came into being following the Treaty of Union in 1706, ratified by the Acts of Union 1707, which united the kingdoms of England
England
and Scotland
Scotland
to form a single kingdom encompassing the whole island of Great Britain
Great Britain
and its outlying islands, with the exception of the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and the Channel Islands. It also did not include Ireland, which remained a separate realm. The unitary state was governed by a single parliament and government that was based in Westminster
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Watauga River
The Watauga /wɑːˈtɑːwɡɑː/ [4] River is a large stream of western North Carolina
North Carolina
and East Tennessee. It is 78.5 miles (126.3 km) long with its headwaters on the slopes of Grandfather Mountain and Peak Mountain in Watauga County, North Carolina.Contents1 Course1.1 Impoundment2 History 3 Recreation3.1 Whitewater 3.2 TVA recreation areas 3.3 Influence of weather4 See also 5 Notes and references 6 External linksCourse[edit] The Watauga River
Watauga River
rises from a spring near the base of Peak Mountain at Linville Gap in Avery County, North Carolina. The spring emanates from the western side of the Tennessee
Tennessee
Valley Divide, which is, at this location, congruent with the Eastern Continental Divide. On the other side of the divides at Linville Gap are the headwaters of the Linville River
Linville River
in the Upper Catawba Watershed
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Nolichucky River
The Nolichucky River
Nolichucky River
is a 115-mile (185 km) river that flows through Western North Carolina
North Carolina
and East Tennessee, in the southeastern United States.[6] Traversing the Pisgah National Forest
Pisgah National Forest
and the Cherokee National Forest
Cherokee National Forest
in the Blue Ridge Mountains, the river's watershed is home to some of the highest mountains in the Appalachians, including Mount Mitchell, the highest point in the eastern United States
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Chickamauga Cherokee
The Chickamauga Cherokee
Chickamauga Cherokee
were a group that separated from the greater body of the Cherokee tribes during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). The majority of the Cherokee people wished to make peace with the American rebels near the end of 1776 following several military setbacks and the reprisals that followed. The Chickamauga followers of headman, Dragging Canoe, moved with him down the Tennessee River
Tennessee River
away from their historic Overhill Cherokee
Overhill Cherokee
towns in the winter of 1776–1777. Relocated in a more isolated area, they established eleven new towns in order to gain distance from colonists' encroachments. The frontier Americans associated Dragging Canoe and his band with their new town on the Chickamauga Creek, and began to refer to them as the Chickamaugas
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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Commissioners
A commissioner is, in principle, a member of a commission or an individual who has been given a commission (official charge or authority to do something, the noun's second meaning). In practice, the title of commissioner has evolved to include a variety of senior officials, often sitting on a specific commission. In particular, commissioner frequently refers to senior police or government officials. A High Commissioner
High Commissioner
is equivalent to an ambassador, originally between the United Kingdom and the Dominions and now between all Commonwealth states, whether Commonwealth realms, republics, or countries having a monarch other than that of the realms. The title is sometimes given to senior officials in the private sector; for instance, many North American sports leagues. There is some confusion between commissioners and commissaries, because other European languages use the same word for both
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Physiographic Province
A physiographic province is a geographic region with a characteristic geomorphology, and often specific subsurface rock type or structural elements. The continents are subdivided into various physiographic provinces, each having a specific character, relief, and environment which contributes to its uniqueness
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Petition
A petition is a request to do something, most commonly addressed to a government official or public entity. Petitions to a deity are a form of prayer called supplication. In the colloquial sense, a petition is a document addressed to some official and signed by numerous individuals. A petition may be oral rather than written, or may be transmitted via the Internet.Contents1 Legal 2 Early history 3 Modern use 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLegal[edit] Petition
Petition
can also be the title of a legal pleading that initiates a legal case. The initial pleading in a civil lawsuit that seeks only money (damages) might be called (in most U.S. courts) a complaint
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Blue Ridge Mountains
The Blue Ridge Mountains
Blue Ridge Mountains
are a physiographic province of the larger Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
range. This province consists of northern and southern physiographic regions, which divide near the Roanoke River gap.[1] The mountain range is located in the eastern United States, starting at its southernmost portion in Georgia, then ending northward in Pennsylvania. To the west of the Blue Ridge, between it and the bulk of the Appalachians, lies the Great Appalachian Valley, bordered on the west by the Ridge and Valley province of the Appalachian range. The Blue Ridge Mountains
Blue Ridge Mountains
are noted for having a bluish color when seen from a distance
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Cumberland Mountains
The Cumberland Mountains
Cumberland Mountains
are a mountain range in the southeastern section of the Appalachian Mountains. They are located in southern West Virginia, western Virginia, eastern edges of Kentucky, and eastern middle Tennessee, including the Crab Orchard Mountains.[1] Their highest peak, with an elevation of 4,223 feet (1,287 m) above mean sea level, is High Knob, which is located near Norton, Virginia. According to the USGS, the Cumberland Mountain range is 131 miles (211 km) long and 20 miles (32 km) wide, bounded by the Russell Fork
Russell Fork
on the northeast, the Pound River
Pound River
and Powell River on the southeast, Cove Creek on the southwest, and Tackett Creek, the Cumberland River, Poor Fork Cumberland River, and Elkhorn Creek on the northwest
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Cumberland Plateau
The Cumberland Plateau
Cumberland Plateau
is the southern part of the Appalachian Plateau in the Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
of the United States. It includes much of eastern Kentucky
Kentucky
and Tennessee, and portions of northern Alabama
Alabama
and northwest Georgia.[1] The terms "Allegheny Plateau" and the "Cumberland Plateau" both refer to the dissected plateau lands lying west of the main Appalachian Mountains. The terms stem from historical usage rather than geological difference, so there is no strict dividing line between the two
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