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Washington Blade
The Washington Blade
Washington Blade
is a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) newspaper in the Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
metropolitan area. The Blade is the oldest LGBT
LGBT
newspaper in the United States and third largest by circulation, behind the Philadelphia Gay
Gay
News and the Gay
Gay
City News of New York City.[2][3] The Blade is often referred to as America's gay newspaper of record because it chronicled LGBT
LGBT
news locally, nationally, and internationally.[4][5][6] The New York Times
The New York Times
said the Blade is considered "one of the most influential publications written for a gay audience."[7] The paper was originally launched by a group of volunteers as an independent publication in October 1969 with a focus on bringing the community together
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LGBT
LGBT
LGBT
or GLBT is an initialism that stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. In use since the 1990s, the term is an adaptation of the initialism LGB, which was used to replace the term gay in reference to the LGBT community
LGBT community
beginning in the mid-to-late 1980s.[1] Activists believed that the term gay community did not accurately represent all those to whom it referred.[2] The initialism has become mainstream as a self-designation; it has been adopted by the majority of sexuality and gender identity-based community centers and media in the United States, as well as some other English-speaking countries.[3][4] The initialism LGBT
LGBT
is intended to emphasize a diversity of sexuality and gender identity-based cultures
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Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
(WMATA /wəˈmɑːtə/ wə-MAH-tə),[2] commonly referred to as Metro, is a tri-jurisdictional government agency that operates transit service in the Washington metropolitan area. WMATA was created by the United States Congress as an interstate compact between the District of Columbia, the State of Maryland, and the Commonwealth of Virginia. WMATA provides rapid transit service under the Metrorail name, fixed-route bus service under the Metrobus brand, and paratransit service under the MetroAccess
MetroAccess
brand. The authority is also part of a public–private partnership that operates the DC Circulator
DC Circulator
bus system
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JavaScript
com.netscape.javascript-source [5]Type of format Scripting languagePart of a series onJavaScript JavaScript
JavaScript
syntax JavaScript
JavaScript
library Unobtrusive JavaScript JavaScript
JavaScript
engineLists of Frameworks and LibrariesAjax frameworks JavaScript
JavaScript
web frameworks Comparison of JavaScript
JavaScript
frameworks List of JavaScript
JavaScript
libraries JavaScript
JavaScript
unit testing frameworks JavaScript
JavaScript
Object NotationSee alsoECMAScriptv t e JavaScript
JavaScript
(/ˈdʒɑːvəˌskrɪpt/),[6] often abbreviated as JS, is a high-level, interpreted programming language. It is a language which is also characterized as dynamic, weakly typed, prototype-based and multi-paradigm
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United States Presidential Election, 2008
George W. Bush RepublicanElected President Barack Obama Democratic2008 U.S. Presidential ElectionTimeline General election debatesNational polling Statewide polling PartiesDemocratic PartyCandidates Debates and forums Primaries National polling Statewide polling Results Nominee Convention SuperdelegatesRepublican PartyCandidates Debates and forums Primaries National polling Statewide polling Results Nominee ConventionMinor partiesLibertarian PartyConventionGreen PartyPrimaries ConventionConstitution Party All candidatesRelated racesHouse Senate Governors2004 ← 2008 → 2012v t eThe United States
United States
presidential election of 2008 was the 56th quadrennial presidential election. It was held on Tuesday, November 4, 2008
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John McCain
John Sidney McCain III (born August 29, 1936) is an American politician serving as the senior United States Senator
United States Senator
from Arizona since 1987. He was the Republican nominee for President of the United States in the 2008 election, which he lost to Barack Obama. McCain graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy
U.S. Naval Academy
in 1958 and followed his father and grandfather—both four-star admirals—into the United States Navy. He became a naval aviator and flew ground-attack aircraft from aircraft carriers. During the Vietnam
Vietnam
War, he was almost killed in the 1967 USS Forrestal fire. While McCain was on a bombing mission over Hanoi
Hanoi
in October 1967, he was shot down, seriously injured, and captured by the North Vietnamese. He was a prisoner of war until 1973. McCain experienced episodes of torture and refused an out-of-sequence early repatriation offer
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Republican Party (United States)
The Republican Party, commonly referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party. The party is named after republicanism, the dominant value during the American Revolution. Founded by anti-slavery activists, economic modernizers, ex Whigs and ex Free Soilers in 1854, the Republicans dominated politics nationally and in the majority of northern states for most of the period between 1860 and 1932.[16] The Republican Party originally championed classical liberal ideas, including anti-slavery and economic reforms.[17][18] The party was usually dominant over the Democrats during the Third Party System
Third Party System
and Fourth Party System. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
formed the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party after being rejected by the GOP and ran as a candidate
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Shareholder
A shareholder or stockholder is an individual or institution (including a corporation) that legally owns one or more shares of stock in a public or private corporation. Shareholders may be referred to as members of a corporation. Legally, a person is not a shareholder in a corporation until his or her name and other details are entered in the register of shareholders.[1] Shareholders of a corporation are legally separate from the corporation itself. They are generally not liable for the debts of the corporation; and the shareholders' liability for company debts are said to be limited to the unpaid share price, unless if a shareholder has offered guarantees. Description[edit] Shareholders are granted special privileges depending on the class of stock
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Avalon Equity Partners
Avalon Equity Partners is a New York, New York-based investment group that invested in media, communications and information services industries
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Washington City Paper
The Washington City Paper
Washington City Paper
is a U.S. alternative weekly newspaper serving the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. The City Paper is distributed on Thursdays; its average circulation in 2006 was 85,588. The paper's editorial mix is focused exclusively on local news and arts. 2018 circulation is 30,000.Contents1 History 2 Contents 3 Notable former staffers 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Washington City Paper
Washington City Paper
was started in 1981 by Russ Smith and Alan Hirsch, the owners of the Baltimore City Paper. For its first year it was called 1981. The name was changed to City Paper in January 1982 and in December 1982 Smith and Hirsch sold 80% of it to Chicago Reader, Inc.[2] In 1988, Chicago Reader, Inc. acquired the remaining 20% interest
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Eleanor Holmes Norton
Eleanor Holmes Norton
Eleanor Holmes Norton
(born June 13, 1937) is an American politician serving as a non-voting Delegate to the United States
United States
House of Representatives representing the District of Columbia
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LGBTQ
LGBT
LGBT
or GLBT is an initialism that stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. In use since the 1990s, the term is an adaptation of the initialism LGB, which was used to replace the term gay in reference to the LGBT community
LGBT community
beginning in the mid-to-late 1980s.[1] Activists believed that the term gay community did not accurately represent all those to whom it referred.[2] The initialism has become mainstream as a self-designation; it has been adopted by the majority of sexuality and gender identity-based community centers and media in the United States, as well as some other English-speaking countries.[3][4] The initialism LGBT
LGBT
is intended to emphasize a diversity of sexuality and gender identity-based cultures
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Masthead (publishing)
In American usage, a publication's masthead is a printed list, published in a fixed position in each edition, of its owners, departments, officers and address details,[1][2] which in British English usage is known as imprint.[3] In the UK and many other Commonwealth nations, "the masthead" is a publication's designed title as it appears on the front page;[3] what in American English is known as the nameplate. References[edit]^ Funk & Wagnall's Standard Dictionary, New York 1960 ^ E.g., masthead of The New York Times ^ a b The Guardian: "Newspaper terminology" Archived 2013-08-30 at WebCite Linked 2013-06-16This publishing-related article is a stub
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Weekly Newspaper
A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events. Newspapers
Newspapers
can cover wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sport and art and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns. Most newspapers are businesses, and they pay their expenses with a mixture of subscription revenue, newsstand sales, and advertising revenue. The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers. Newspapers
Newspapers
have traditionally been published in print (usually on cheap, low-grade paper called newsprint)
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Maryland
Motto(s): Fatti maschii, parole femine (English: Strong Deeds, Gentle Words)[3] The Latin text encircling the seal: Scuto bonæ voluntatis tuæ coronasti nos (With favor Wilt Thou Compass Us as with a Shield) Psalm 5:12[4]State song(s): "Maryland, My Maryland"Official language None (English, de facto)Demonym MarylanderCapital AnnapolisLargest city BaltimoreLargest metro Baltimore- Washington Metro
Washington Metro
AreaArea Ranked 42nd • Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km2) • Width 196 miles (315 km) • Length 119 m
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Virginia
Virginia
Virginia
(/vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen); officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern[6] and Mid-Atlantic[7] regions of the United States
United States
located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. Virginia
Virginia
is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first English colonial possession established in mainland North America,[8] and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains
Blue Ridge Mountains
and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach
Virginia Beach
is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision
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