HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Warren Magnuson
Warren Grant "Maggie" Magnuson (April 12, 1905 – May 20, 1989) was an American lawyer and politician. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as a U.S. Representative (1937–1944) and a U.S. Senator (1944–1981) from Washington
[...More...]

"Warren Magnuson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of Washington School Of Law
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
[...More...]

"University Of Washington School Of Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grand Forks, North Dakota
Grand Forks is the third-largest city in the State of North Dakota (after Fargo and Bismarck) and is the county seat of Grand Forks County. According to the 2010 census, the city's population was 52,838, while the total of the city and surrounding metropolitan area was 98,461.[5] Grand Forks, along with its twin city of East Grand Forks, Minnesota, forms the center of the Grand Forks, ND-MN Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is often called Greater Grand Forks or The Grand Cities. Located on the western banks of the north-flowing Red River of the North, in a flat region known as the Red River Valley,[6] the city is prone to flooding. The Red River Flood of 1997 devastated the city.[7] Originally called Les Grandes Fourches by French fur traders from Canada, who had long worked and lived in the region, steamboat captain Alexander Griggs platted a community after being forced to winter there
[...More...]

"Grand Forks, North Dakota" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Minnesota
Minnesota
Minnesota
(/ˌmɪnɪˈsoʊtə/ ( listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and northern regions of the United States. Minnesota
Minnesota
was admitted as the 32nd U.S. state
U.S. state
on May 11, 1858, created from the eastern half of the Minnesota
Minnesota
Territory. The state has a large number of lakes, and is known by the slogan "Land of 10,000 Lakes". Its official motto is L'Étoile du Nord
L'Étoile du Nord
(French: Star of the North). Minnesota
Minnesota
is the 12th largest in area and the 22nd most populous of the U.S
[...More...]

"Minnesota" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scandinavia
Scandinavia[a] (/ˌskændɪˈneɪviə/ SKAN-dih-NAY-vee-ə) is a region in Northern Europe, characterized by common ethnocultural North Germanic heritage and mutually intelligible North Germanic languages.[2] The term Scandinavia
Scandinavia
in local usage covers the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, but in English usage, it also sometimes refers to the Scandinavian Peninsula
Scandinavian Peninsula
or to the broader region which includes Finland
Finland
and Iceland.[1] This broader region is usually known locally as the Nordic countries.[3] The remote Norwegian islands of Svalbard
Svalbard
and Jan Mayen
Jan Mayen
are usually not seen as a part of Scandinavia, nor is Greenland, a constituent country within the Kingdom of Denmark
[...More...]

"Scandinavia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quarterback
A quarterback (commonly abbreviated "QB") is a position in American and Canadian football. Quarterbacks are members of the offensive team and line up directly behind the offensive line. In modern American football, the quarterback is usually considered the leader of the offensive team, and is often responsible for calling the play in the huddle.Contents1 Overview 2 Leadership 3 Trends and other roles3.1 Special
Special
tactics 3.2 Dual-threat quarterbacks 3.3 Two-quarterback system4 History 5 Race 6 See also 7 References7.1 BibliographyOverview[edit]Mike Quinn, former Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
quarterback, throwing the football.In modern American football, the quarterback is usually the leader of the offense. The quarterback touches the ball on almost every offensive play, and his successes and failures can have a significant impact on the fortunes of his team
[...More...]

"Quarterback" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American Football
American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada[citation needed] and also known as gridiron,[nb 1] is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal
[...More...]

"American Football" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baseball
Baseball
Baseball
is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objectives of the offensive team (batting team) are to hit the ball into the field of play, and to run the bases - having its runners advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team (fielding team) is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases.[1] A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate (the place where the player started as a batter). The team who scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner. The first objective of the batting team is to have a player reach base safely
[...More...]

"Baseball" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

YMCA
The Young Men's Christian Association, commonly known as the YMCA
YMCA
or simply the Y, is a worldwide organization based in Geneva, Switzerland, with more than 58 million beneficiaries from 125 national associations.[1] It was founded on 6 June 1844 by George Williams in London
London
and aims to put Christian principles into practice by developing a healthy "body, mind, and spirit". These three angles are reflected by the different sides of the (red) triangle—part of all YMCA
YMCA
logos. From its inception, it grew rapidly and ultimately became a worldwide movement founded on the principles of Muscular Christianity. Local YMCAs engage in a wide variety of charitable activities, including providing athletic facilities, holding classes for a wide variety of skills, promoting Christianity, and humanitarian work
[...More...]

"YMCA" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fargo, North Dakota
Fargo is the most populous city in the state of North Dakota, accounting for nearly 16% of the state population.[5] Fargo is also the county seat of Cass County
[...More...]

"Fargo, North Dakota" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

North Dakota
North Dakota
North Dakota
( /- dəˈkoʊtə/ ( listen)) is a U.S. state in the midwestern and northern regions of the United States. It is the nineteenth largest in area, the fourth smallest by population, and the fourth most sparsely populated of the 50 states. North Dakota
North Dakota
was admitted as the 39th state to the Union on November 2, 1889
[...More...]

"North Dakota" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of North Dakota
The University of North Dakota
North Dakota
(also known as UND or North Dakota) is a public research university in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Established by the Dakota Territorial Assembly in 1883, six years before the establishment of the state of North Dakota, it is the state's oldest. UND was founded with a strong liberal arts foundation, but has grown into a prominent scientific research university. It is classified by the Carnegie Foundation as having high research activity, and is considered one of the top academic and research institutions in the northern Midwest.[3][non-primary source needed] The University offers a variety of professional and specialized programs, including the only schools of law and medicine in the state of North Dakota. Its best known college is perhaps its John D
[...More...]

"University Of North Dakota" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

North Dakota State University
North Dakota
North Dakota
State University of Agriculture
Agriculture
and Applied Sciences, more commonly known as North Dakota
North Dakota
State University (NDSU), is a public research university that sits on a 258-acre campus (~1 km2) in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S. The institution was founded as North Dakota
North Dakota
Agricultural College in 1890 as the research land-grant institution for the state of North Dakota. NDSU is a comprehensive doctoral research university with programs involved in very high research activity.[10] NDSU offers 102 undergraduate majors, 170 undergraduate degree programs, 6 undergraduate certificate programs, 79 undergraduate minors, 81 master’s degree programs, 47 doctoral degree programs of study and 10 graduate certificate programs
[...More...]

"North Dakota State University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Democratic Party (United States)
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

[...More...]

"Democratic Party (United States)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Canada
Coordinates: 60°N 95°W / 60°N 95°W / 60; -95CanadaFlagMotto: A Mari Usque Ad Mare  (Latin) (English: "From Sea to Sea")Anthem: "O Canada"Royal anthem: "God Save the Queen"[1]Capital Ottawa 45°24′N 75°40′W / 45.400°N 75.667°W / 45.400; -75.667Largest city TorontoOfficial languagesEnglish FrenchEthnic groupsList of ethnicities74.3% European 14.5% Asian 5.1% Indigenous 3.4% Caribbean and Latin American 2.9% African 0.2% Oceanian[2]ReligionList of religions67.2% Christianity 23.9% Non-religious 3.2% Islam 1.5% Hinduism 1.4% Sikhism 1.1% Buddhism 1.0% Judaism 0.6% Other -[3]Demonym CanadianGovernment Federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy[4]• MonarchElizabeth II• Governor GeneralJulie Payette• Prime MinisterJustin Trudeau• Chie
[...More...]

"Canada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Freight Rail Transport
Rail freight transport
Rail freight transport
is the use of railroads and trains to transport cargo as opposed to human passengers. A freight train or goods train is a group of freight cars (US) or goods wagons (International Union of Railways) hauled by one or more locomotives on a railway, transporting cargo all or some of the way between the shipper and the intended destination as part of the logistics chain. Trains may haul bulk material, intermodal containers, general freight or specialized freight in purpose-designed cars.[1] Rail freight practices and economics vary by country and region. When considered in terms of ton-miles or tonne-kilometers hauled per unit of energy consumed, rail transport can be more efficient than other means of transportation. Maximum economies are typically realized with bulk commodities (e.g., coal), especially when hauled over long distances
[...More...]

"Freight Rail Transport" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.