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Warren County, New Jersey
Warren County is a county located in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New Jersey. As of the 2017 Census estimate, the county's population was 106,798, making it the 19th-most populous of the state's 21 counties,[5][6][7] representing a decrease of 1.7% from the 108,692 enumerated in the 2010 United States
United States
Census,[4] in turn having increased by 6,255 (+6.1%) from 102,437 counted at the 2000 Census,[8][9][10] Its county seat is Belvidere.[3] It is part of the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ metropolitan area and is generally considered the eastern border of the Lehigh Valley.[11][12] It is considered part of the New York-Newark, NY-NJ-CT-PA Combined Statistical Area, and shares its western border with the New York City Metropolitan Area,[13] with its northwestern section bordering The Poconos
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Coniferous
Cordaitales
Cordaitales
† Pinales   Pinaceae   Araucariaceae   Podocarpaceae   Sciadopityaceae   Cupressaceae   Cephalotaxaceae   Taxaceae Vojnovskyales † Voltziales †SynonymsConiferophyta ConiferaeThe Pinophyta, also known as Coniferophyta or Coniferae, or commonly as conifers, are a division of vascular land plants containing a single extant class, Pinopsida. They are gymnosperms, cone-bearing seed plants. All extant conifers are perennial woody plants with secondary growth. The great majority are trees, though a few are shrubs
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New Jersey Legislature
The New Jersey
New Jersey
Legislature
Legislature
is the legislative branch of the government of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New Jersey. In its current form, as defined by the New Jersey
New Jersey
Constitution of 1947, the Legislature
Legislature
consists of two houses: the General Assembly and the Senate. The Legislature
Legislature
meets in the New Jersey
New Jersey
State House, in the state capital of Trenton
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American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
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Battle Of Bunker Hill
United ColoniesConnecticut Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Great BritainCommanders and leaders William Prescott Israel Putnam Joseph Warren † John Stark William Howe Thomas Gage Sir Robert Pigot James Abercrombie † Henry Clinton Samuel Graves John Pitcairn †Strength~2,400[3] 3,000+[4]Casualties and losses115 killed, 305 wounded, 30 captured (20 POWs died) Total: 450[5] 19 officers killed 62 officers wounded 207 soldiers killed 766 soldiers wounded Total: 1,054[6]The Battle of Bunker Hill
Battle of Bunker Hill
was fought on June 17, 1775, during the Siege of Boston
Siege of Boston
in the early stages of the American Revolutionary War. The battle is named after Bunker Hill in Charlestown, Massachusetts, which was peripherally involved in the battle
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2000 United States Census
[[File:Seal of the United States Census
United States Census
Bur tion = U.S. Census Bureau Sealframeless]]Census LogoGeneral informationCountry United StatesDate taken April 1, 2000Total population 281,421,906Percent change 13.2%Most populous state California 33,871,648Least populous state Wyoming 493,782The Twenty-second United States
United States
Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13.2% over the 248,709,873 people enumerated during the 1990 Census.[1] This was the twenty-second federal census and was at the time the largest civilly administered peacetime effort in the United States.[2] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 2000 census, which contained over 100 questions
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Population Estimates Program
The Population Estimates Program (PEP) is a program of the US Census Bureau that publishes annual population estimates and estimates of birth, death, and international migration rates for people in the United States.[1] In addition to publishing those aggregate estimates for the entire country, the program also publishes those yearly estimates by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin at the national, state, county and city and town level
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U.S. State
A state is a constituent political entity of the United States. There are currently 50 states, which are bound together in a union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the United States federal government. Due to the shared sovereignty between each state and the federal government, Americans
Americans
are citizens of both the federal republic and of the state in which they reside.[3] State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons covered by certain types of court orders (e.g., paroled convicts and children of divorced spouses who are sharing custody)
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County (United States)
In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority.[1] The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana
Louisiana
and Alaska
Alaska
have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.[1] Most counties have subdivisions which may include municipalities and unincorporated areas. Others have no further divisions, or may serve as a consolidated city-county. Some municipalities are in multiple counties; New York City
New York City
is uniquely partitioned into multiple counties, referred to at the city government level as boroughs. The U.S. federal government
U.S. federal government
uses the term "county equivalent" to describe non-county administrative or statistical areas that are comparable to counties
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North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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2010 United States Census
The 2010 United States
United States
Census (commonly referred to as the 2010 Census) is the twenty-third and most recent United States
United States
national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010.[1] The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired.[2][3] The population of the United States
United States
was counted as 308,745,538,[4] a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census.Contents1 Introduction 2 Major changes 3 Cost 4 Technology 5 Marketing and undercounts 6 Reapportionment 7 Controversies7.1 Clemons v
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Great Appalachian Valley
The Great Valley, also called the Great Appalachian Valley
Great Appalachian Valley
or Great Valley Region, is one of the major landform features of eastern North America. It is a gigantic trough—a chain of valley lowlands—and the central feature of the Appalachian Mountain
Appalachian Mountain
system. The trough stretches about 1,200 miles (1,900 km) from Quebec
Quebec
to Alabama
Alabama
and has been an important north-south route of travel since prehistoric times.A map of the Appalachian Mountains, highlighting the Great Appalachian Valley
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Appalachian Mountains
The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
(/ˌæpəˈlæʃɪn, -ˈleɪtʃɪn/ ( listen);[note 1] French: les Appalaches), often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern North America. The Appalachians first formed roughly 480 million years ago during the Ordovician
Ordovician
Period. They once reached elevations similar to those of the Alps
Alps
and the Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
before experiencing natural erosion.[3][4] The Appalachian chain is a barrier to east-west travel, as it forms a series of alternating ridgelines and valleys oriented in opposition to most highways and railroads running east-west. Definitions vary on the precise boundaries of the Appalachians
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Confluence
In geography, a confluence (also: conflux) occurs where two or more flowing bodies of water join together to form a single channel.[1] A confluence can occur in several configurations: at the point where a tributary joins a larger river (main stem); or where two streams meet to become the source of a river of a new name (such as the confluence of the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers at Pittsburgh, forming the Ohio); or where two separated channels of a river (forming a river island) rejoin at the downstream end.Contents1 Scientific study of confluences1.1 Confluence
Confluence
Flow Zones (River)2 Confluences and humankind 3 Notable confluences3.1 Africa 3.2 Asia 3.3 Australia 3.4 Europe 3.5 North America 3.6 South America4 Confluences not of two rivers 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksScientific study of confluences[edit] Confluences are studied in a variety of sciences
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County Seat
A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in the United States, Canada, Romania, Mainland China
Mainland China
and Taiwan. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.Contents1 Function 2 U.S. counties with more than one county seat 3 Other variations3.1 New England 3.2 Virginia 3.3 South Dakota 3.4 Louisiana 3.5 Alaska 3.6 Canada
Canada
and Vermont4 Lists of U.S. county seats by state 5 Lists of Taiwan
Taiwan
county seats by county 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFunction[edit] In most of the United States, counties are the political subdivisions of a state. The city, town, or populated place that houses county government is known as the seat of its respective county
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Republican Party (United States)
The Republican Party, commonly referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party. The party is named after republicanism, the dominant value during the American Revolution. Founded by anti-slavery activists, economic modernizers, ex Whigs and ex Free Soilers in 1854, the Republicans dominated politics nationally and in the majority of northern states for most of the period between 1860 and 1932.[16] The Republican Party originally championed classical liberal ideas, including anti-slavery and economic reforms.[17][18] The party was usually dominant over the Democrats during the Third Party System
Third Party System
and Fourth Party System. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
formed the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party after being rejected by the GOP and ran as a candidate
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