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Warlingham
Warlingham
Warlingham
is a village in the Tandridge district of Surrey, England, 14.2 miles (22.9 km) south of the centre of London
London
and 22.3 miles (35.9 km) east of the county town, Guildford. Warlingham
Warlingham
is the centre of a civil parish that includes Hamsey Green, a contiguous, smaller settlement to the north. Caterham
Caterham
is the nearest town, 2.0 miles (3.2 km) to the southwest.Contents1 History1.1 Etymology 1.2 Early history, Dark Ages and Middle Ages 1.3 Manors1.3.1 History of the church1.4 Post Industrial Revolution2 Geography2.1 Elevations3 Economy 4 Local government 5 Amenities 6 Local schools 7 Local transport 8 Sport 9 Demography and housing 10 See also 11 Notes and references 12 External linksHistory[edit] Etymology[edit] The name means the home(stead) (-ham) of the followers (-(l)ing) of Waer(l)a
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Free Warren
Free warren—often simply warren—refers to a type of franchise or privilege conveyed by a sovereign in mediaeval England
England
to a subject, promising to hold them harmless for killing game of certain species within a stipulated area, usually a wood or small forest. The sovereign involved might be either the monarch or a marcher lord.Contents1 Law 2 Etymology 3 Free warren and domestic warren 4 Warren and warden 5 Warren and warrant 6 Beasts of warren6.1 Manwood7 Bibliography 8 ReferencesLaw[edit] The grant of free warren could be as a gift, or in exchange for consideration, and might be later alienated by the grantee. The stipulated area might be coextensive with the frank-tenement of the grantee, or it might be discontinuous or even at a considerable remove from the grantee's holdings
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Warrington
Warrington
Warrington
is a large town and unitary authority area in Cheshire, England, on the banks of the River Mersey, 20 miles (32 km) east of Liverpool, and 20 miles (32 km) west of Manchester. The population in 2016 was estimated at 208,800,[2] more than double that of 1968 when it became a New Town. Warrington
Warrington
is the largest town in the county of Cheshire. Warrington
Warrington
was founded by the Romans at an important crossing place on the River Mersey. A new settlement was established by the Saxons. By the Middle Ages, Warrington
Warrington
had emerged as a market town at the lowest bridging point of the river
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Surrey
Surrey
Surrey
(/ˈsʌri/ SURR-ee)[2] is a county in South East England, and one of the home counties. It borders Kent
Kent
to the east, Sussex
Sussex
to the south, Hampshire
Hampshire
to the west, Berkshire
Berkshire
to the north-west and Greater London
London
to the north-east. The county town is popularly considered to be Guildford
Guildford
although Surrey County Council
Surrey County Council
sits outside its jurisdiction in Kingston upon Thames, part of Greater London
Greater London
since 1965
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List Of United Kingdom Parliament Constituencies
There are 650 constituencies in the United Kingdom, each electing a single Member of Parliament to the House of Commons ordinarily every five years. Voting
Voting
last took place in all 650 of those constituencies at the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election on 8 June 2017, and these results have been counted and verified. The election on 8 June 2017 elected 650 constituencies. 317 are held by the Conservative Party, 262 are held by the Labour Party, 35 are held by the Scottish National Party, 12 are held by the Liberal Democrats and 10 are held by the Democratic Unionist Party, with the balance held by various smaller parties, none of which have more than 8 seats, plus four unaffiliated MPs
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Villages In England
In England, a civil parish is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. It is an administrative parish, in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish. A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch. Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council. Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Guildford
Guildford
Guildford
/ˈɡɪlfərd/ ( listen)[1] is a large town in Surrey, England, United Kingdom
United Kingdom

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Eolith
An eolith (from Greek "eos", dawn, and "lithos", stone) is a chipped flint nodule. Eoliths were once thought to have been artifacts, the earliest stone tools, but are now believed to be geofacts (stone fragments produced by fully natural geological processes such as glaciation). The first eoliths were collected in Kent
Kent
by Benjamin Harrison, an amateur naturalist and archaeologist, in 1885 (though the name "eolith" wasn't coined until 1892, by J. Allen Browne). Harrison's discoveries were published by Sir Joseph Prestwich
Joseph Prestwich
in 1891, and eoliths were generally accepted to have been crudely made tools, dating from the Pliocene. Further discoveries of eoliths in the early 20th century – in East Anglia
East Anglia
by J. Reid Moir and in continental Europe
Europe
by Aimé Louis Rutot and H
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South East Coast Ambulance Service
The South East Coast Ambulance Service
South East Coast Ambulance Service
NHS Foundation Trust (SECAmb) is the NHS Ambulance Services Trust for south-eastern England, covering Kent
Kent
(including Medway), Surrey, West Sussex
West Sussex
and East Sussex (including Brighton and Hove). It also covers a part of north-eastern Hampshire
Hampshire
around Aldershot, Farnborough, Fleet and Yateley. The service was made an NHS foundation trust on 1 March 2011. It is one of 12 ambulance trusts providing England
England
with emergency medical services, and is part of the National Health Service, receiving direct government funding for its role
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Anglo-Saxons
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
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Hundred (division)
A hundred is an administrative division that is geographically part of a larger region. It was formerly used in England, Wales, some parts of the United States, Denmark, Southern Schleswig, Sweden, Finland, Estonia
Estonia
and Norway
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Glebe
Glebe
Glebe
(also known as church furlong, rectory manor or parson's close(s)[1][2]) is an area of land within an ecclesiastical parish used to support a parish priest.Contents1 Medieval origins 2 Britain2.1 Church of England 2.2 Scotland3 Anglo-America 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further readingMedieval origins[edit] In the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
and Anglican
Anglican
church traditions, a glebe is land belonging to a benefice and so by default to its incumbent
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