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War And Beauty
War and Beauty
War and Beauty
(Chinese: 金枝慾孽) is a Hong Kong
Hong Kong
television period drama serial that originally aired on TVB
TVB
Jade from 23 August to 2 October 2004, consisting of 30 episodes. It currently ties with Drive of Life for the record of having the most TVB
TVB
Best Actress winners, including Sheren Tang (2009/2010), Maggie Cheung (2003), Charmaine Sheh (2006/2014), and Gigi Lai
Gigi Lai
(2004 - she won the award for her work in this drama)
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Period Drama
The term historical period drama (also historical drama, period drama, costume drama, and period piece) refers to a work set in a past time period, usually used in the context of film and television. It is an informal crossover term that can apply to several genres and is often heard in the context of historical fiction and romances, adventure films and swashbucklers. A period piece may be set in a vague or general era such as the middle ages or a specific period such as the Roaring Twenties. A religious work can qualify as period drama but not as historical drama.Contents1 Historical accuracy 2 Examples 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksHistorical accuracy[edit] Some works attempt to accurately portray historical events or persons, to the degree that the available historical research will allow. These types of works are also known as docudrama, examples being Cinderella Man, Schindler’s List, and Lincoln
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Jyutping
Jyutping
Jyutping
(Chinese: 粵拼; Jyutping: Jyut6ping3; Cantonese pronunciation: [jỳːt̚.pʰēŋ]) is a romanisation system for Cantonese
Cantonese
developed by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK), an academic group, in 1993. Its formal name is The Linguistic Society of Hong Kong Cantonese
Cantonese
Romanisation
Romanisation
Scheme
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War Of The Genders
War of the Genders is a Hong Kong
Hong Kong
television sitcom produced by TVB. It originally aired on TVB
TVB
Jade from 21 February to 7 July 2000, totalling 100 episodes. It revolves around the office workers employed at C.K.Law Firm, a fictional law firm located in Central, Hong Kong. The series received critical acclaim and explosive success during its run. It achieved an average viewership rating of 47 points and a peak of 50 points, the highest-ever rating achieved by a TVB
TVB
drama. This record was later broken by the 2005 Korean television drama Dae Jang Geum and the 2008 TVB
TVB
drama Moonlight Resonance, both which also peaked at 50.Contents1 Plot 2 Characters2.1 Main characters 2.2 Recurring characters 2.3 Minor characters3 External linksPlot[edit] The series revolved around a solicitor Frances Mo (Carol Cheng) and her paralegal advisor Yu Lok-tin (Dayo Wong)
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DVD
DVD
DVD
(an abbreviation of "digital video disc"[5] or "digital versatile disc"[6][7]) is a digital optical disc storage format invented and developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
in 1995. The medium can store any kind of digital data and is widely used for software and other computer files as well as video programs watched using DVD
DVD
players. DVDs offer higher storage capacity than compact discs while having the same dimensions. Prerecorded DVDs are mass-produced using molding machines that physically stamp data onto the DVD. Such discs are a form of DVD-ROM because data can only be read and not written or erased. Blank recordable DVD
DVD
discs ( DVD-R
DVD-R
and DVD+R) can be recorded once using a DVD recorder and then function as a DVD-ROM
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Empress Xiaoherui
Empress Xiaoherui (1776–1850) was the second Empress Consort of the Jiaqing Emperor of the Qing dynasty.Contents1 Life 2 See also 3 References 4 SourcesLife[edit] Empress Xiaoherui was born in the Manchu Niohuru clan. She was the daughter of Gong'ala (恭阿拉), who served as Secretary of the Ministry of Rites during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor. Lady Niohuru entered the Forbidden City in an unknown year, and was married as a secondary consort to Yongyan (Prince Jia), the 15th son of the Qianlong Emperor. In 1793, she gave birth to Prince Jia's seventh daughter, but her daughter died in 1795 before reaching adulthood. She also bore Prince Jia two sons, Miankai and Mianxin, in 1795 and 1805 respectively. In 1796, the Qianlong Emperor abdicated and became Retired Emperor, while Prince Jia succeeded him and was enthroned as the Jiaqing Emperor. Lady Niohuru, as a former secondary consort of the emperor, was granted the rank of Noble Consort
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VCD
Video
Video
CD (abbreviated as VCD, and also known as Compact Disc digital video) is a home video format and the first format for distributing films on standard 120 mm (4.7 in) optical discs. The format was widely adopted in Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
and superseded the VHS
VHS
and Betamax
Betamax
systems in the region until DVD
DVD
finally became affordable in the region in the late 2000s. The format is a standard digital format for storing video on a compact disc
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Forbidden Palace
The Forbidden City is a palace complex in central Beijing, China. The former Chinese imperial palace from the Ming dynasty to the end of the Qing dynasty—the years 1420 to 1912, it now houses the Palace Museum. The Forbidden City served as the home of emperors and their households as well as the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government for almost 500 years. Constructed from 1406 to 1420, the complex consists of 980 buildings[2] and covers 72 hectares (over 180 acres).[3][4] The palace exemplifies traditional Chinese palatial architecture,[5] and has influenced cultural and architectural developments in East Asia and elsewhere
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Jiaqing Emperor
The Jiaqing Emperor
Jiaqing Emperor
(13 November 1760 – 2 September 1820), personal name Yongyan, was the seventh emperor of the Manchu-led Qing dynasty, and the fifth Qing emperor to rule over China, from 1796 to 1820. He was the 15th son of the Qianlong Emperor
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Qing Dynasty
Tael
Tael
(liǎng)Preceded by Succeeded byLater JinShunSouthern MingDzungarRepublic of ChinaMongoliaThe Qing dynasty, also known as the Qing Empire, officially the Great Qing (English: /tʃɪŋ/), was the last imperial dynasty of China, established in 1636 and ruling China from 1644 to 1912. It was preceded by the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
and succeeded by the Republic of China. The Qing multi-cultural empire lasted almost three centuries and formed the territorial base for the modern Chinese state. It was the fourth largest empire in world history. The dynasty was founded by the Jurchen Aisin Gioro
Aisin Gioro
clan in Manchuria. In the late sixteenth century, Nurhaci, originally a Ming vassal, began organizing "Banners", military-social units that included Jurchen, Han Chinese, and Mongol elements
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Forbidden City
The Forbidden City
The Forbidden City
is a palace complex in central Beijing, China. The former Chinese imperial palace from the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
to the end of the Qing dynasty—the years 1420 to 1912, it now houses the Palace Museum. The Forbidden City
The Forbidden City
served as the home of emperors and their households as well as the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government for almost 500 years. Constructed from 1406 to 1420, the complex consists of 980 buildings[2] and covers 72 hectares (over 180 acres).[3][4] The palace exemplifies traditional Chinese palatial architecture,[5] and has influenced cultural and architectural developments in East Asia
East Asia
and elsewhere
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Political Corruption
Political corruption
Political corruption
is the use of powers by government officials for illegitimate private gain. An illegal act by an officeholder constitutes political corruption only if the act is directly related to their official duties, is done under color of law or involves trading in influence. Forms of corruption vary, but include bribery, extortion, cronyism, nepotism, parochialism, patronage, influence peddling, graft, and embezzlement. Corruption
Corruption
may facilitate criminal enterprise such as drug trafficking, money laundering, and human trafficking, though is not restricted to these activities. Misuse of government power for other purposes, such as repression of political opponents and general police brutality, is also considered political corruption. Masiulis case is a typical example of political corruption. The activities that constitute illegal corruption differ depending on the country or jurisdiction
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Ranks Of Imperial Consorts In China
The ranks of imperial consorts have varied over the course of Chinese history but remained important throughout owing to its importance in management of the inner court and in imperial succession, which ranked heirs according to the prominence of their mothers in addition to their strict birth order
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Harem
Harem
Harem
(Arabic: حريم‎ ḥarīm, "a sacred inviolable place; harem; female members of the family"), also known as zenana in South Asia, properly refers to domestic spaces that are reserved for the women of the house in a Muslim
Muslim
family and are inaccessible to adult males except for close relations. Similar institutions have been common in other Mediterranean
Mediterranean
and Middle Eastern civilizations, especially among royal and upper-class families and the term is sometimes used in non-Islamic contexts. The structure of the harem and the extent of monogamy or polygamy has varied depending on the family's personalities, socio-economic status, and local customs. This private space has been traditionally understood as serving the purposes of maintaining the modesty, privilege, and protection of women
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Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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Han Chinese
The Han Chinese, Han people[27][28][29] or simply Han[28][29][30] (/hɑːn/;[31] Mandarin: [xân]; Han characters: 漢人 (Mandarin pinyin: Hànrén; literally "Han people"[32]) or 漢族 (pinyin: Hànzú; literally "Han ethnicity"[33] or "Han ethnic group"[34])) are an East Asian ethnic group and nation.[35] They constitute the world's largest ethnic group, making up about 18% of the global population. The estimated 1.3 billion Han Chinese
Han Chinese
are mostly concentrated in Mainland China, where they make up about 92% of the total population.[2] The
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