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War Brides
War
War
bride is a term used in reference to foreign women who married military personnel in times of war or during their military occupations of foreign countries, especially–but not exclusively–during World War
War
I and World War
War
II. One unusual variant was the telegram war bride; and the first United States couple to do so on March 17, 1942 was the marriage of Ida West and Army Air Corps Capt. Francis Newton Culler, both of South Carolina. One of the largest and best documented war bride phenomena is American servicemen marrying German "Fräuleins" after World War
War
II. By 1949, over 20,000 German war brides had emigrated to the United States.[1] Furthermore, it is estimated that there are "..
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War Children
War children
War children
are those born to a native parent and a parent belonging to a foreign military force (usually an occupying force, but also military personnel stationed at military bases on foreign soil). Having a child by a member of a belligerent force, throughout history and across cultures, is often considered a grave betrayal of social values. Commonly, the native parent (usually a woman) is disowned by family, friends, and society at large. The term "war child" is most commonly used for children born during World War II
World War II
and its aftermath, particularly in relation to children born to fathers in German occupying forces in northern Europe. In Norway, there were also Lebensborn
Lebensborn
children. It is also applied to other situations, such as children born following the widespread rapes during the 1971 Bangladesh atrocities associated with the war of liberation
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RMS Queen Mary
The RMS Queen Mary
RMS Queen Mary
is a retired ocean liner that sailed primarily on the North Atlantic Ocean from 1936 to 1967 for the Cunard Line
Cunard Line
– known as Cunard-White Star Line
Cunard-White Star Line
when the vessel entered service. Built by John Brown & Company in Clydebank, Scotland, Queen Mary, along with RMS Queen Elizabeth,[3] were built as part of Cunard's planned two-ship weekly express service between Southampton, Cherbourg and New York. The two ships were a British response to the express superliners built by German, Italian and French companies in the late 1920s and early 1930s
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Nazi Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°24′E / 52.517°N 13.400°E / 52.517; 13.400 "Drittes Reich" redirects here
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Soviet Union
The Soviet Union
Soviet Union
(Russian: Сове́тский Сою́з, tr. Sovétsky Soyúz, IPA: [sɐˈvʲɛt͡skʲɪj sɐˈjus] ( listen)), officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик, tr. Soyúz Sovétskikh Sotsialistícheskikh Respúblik, IPA: [sɐˈjus sɐˈvʲɛtskʲɪx sətsɨəlʲɪsˈtʲitɕɪskʲɪx rʲɪˈspublʲɪk] ( listen)), abbreviated as the USSR (Russian: СССР, tr. SSSR), was a socialist state in Eurasia
Eurasia
that existed from 1922 to 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics,[a] its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow
Moscow
as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic
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Cold War
The Cold War
Cold War
was a state of geopolitical tension after World War II between powers in the Eastern Bloc
Eastern Bloc
(the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and its satellite states) and powers in the Western Bloc
Western Bloc
(the United States, its NATO allies and others). Historians do not fully agree on the dates, but a common timeframe is the period between 1947, the year the Truman Doctrine, a U.S. foreign policy pledging to aid nations threatened by Soviet expansionism, was announced, and either 1989, when communism fell in Eastern Europe, or 1991, when the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
collapsed
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HMS Victorious
Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Victorious.HMS Victorious (1785), launched at Blackwall Yard, London, was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line HMS Victorious (1808), launched at Bucklers Hard, was a 74-gun third-rate HMS Victorious (1895) was a Majestic-class battleship. She had a quiet career, spending World War I as a dockyard repair ship before being broken up in 1923. HMS Victorious (R38), an Illustrious-class aircraft carrier, launched in 1939. She saw much action in World War II
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Brisbane
Brisbane
Brisbane
(/ˈbrɪzbən/ ( listen))[8] is the capital of and most populous city in the Australian state of Queensland,[9] and the third most populous city in Australia
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San Francisco Peace Treaty
Treaty of San Francisco
Treaty of San Francisco
(サンフランシスコ講和条約, San-Furanshisuko kōwa-Jōyaku), Peace Treaty with Japan (日本国との平和条約, Nihon-koku tono Heiwa-Jōyaku) or commonly known as the Treaty of Peace with Japan, Peace Treaty of San Francisco, or San Francisco Peace Treaty), mostly between Japan
Japan
and the Allied Powers, was officially signed by 48 nations on September 8, 1951, in San Francisco
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Occupation Of Japan
A job, or occupation, is a person's role in society. More specifically, a job is an activity, often regular and often performed in exchange for payment ("for a living"). Many people have multiple jobs (e.g., parent, homemaker, and employee). A person can begin a job by becoming an employee, volunteering, starting a business, or becoming a parent. The duration of a job may range from temporary (e.g., hourly odd jobs) to a lifetime (e.g., judges). An activity that requires a person's mental or physical effort is work (as in "a day's work"). If a person is trained for a certain type of job, they may have a profession. Typically, a job would be a subset of someone's career
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Halifax, Nova Scotia
Halifax (/ˈhælɪfæks/), legally known as the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM), is the capital of the province of Nova Scotia, Canada. The municipality had a population of 403,131 in 2016, with 316,701 in the urban area centred on Halifax Harbour.[3][4] The regional municipality consists of four former municipalities that were amalgamated in 1996: Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford, and the Municipality of Halifax County. Halifax is a major economic centre in Atlantic Canada
Canada
with a large concentration of government services and private sector companies. Major employers and economic generators include the Department of National Defence, Dalhousie University, Saint Mary's University, the Halifax Shipyard, various levels of government, and the Port of Halifax. Agriculture, fishing, mining, forestry and natural gas extraction are major resource industries found in the rural areas of the municipality
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SS Letitia
SS Letitia
SS Letitia
was an ocean liner, built initially for service with the Anchor-Donaldson Line. She continued to serve with its successor company Donaldson Atlantic Line, and was requisitioned for service at the start of the Second World War to serve as an armed merchant cruiser. She was withdrawn from this service in 1941 and became a troop ship. She was badly damaged in 1943 and on being repaired was made a hospital ship in Canada. She was returned to civilian service in 1946 after the end of the war, and was bought by the Ministry of Transport, who renamed her Empire Brent and assigned Donaldson Brothers and Black to manage her. She sailed on a number of voyages, at times carrying troops to the Far East, as well as being an emigration ship to Australia. She was briefly laid up in 1950, but returned to service under charter to the Government of New Zealand
Government of New Zealand
as Captain Cook
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Newfoundland And Labrador
Newfoundland and Labrador
Labrador
(/ˈnjuːfən(d)lənd, -lænd, njuːˈfaʊndlənd ... ˈlæbrədɔːr/;[6] French: Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador; Montagnais: Akamassiss; Newfoundland Irish: Talamh an Éisc agus Labradar) is the most easterly province of Canada
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SS Île De France
The SS Île de France
France
was a French ocean liner built in Saint-Nazaire, France
France
for Compagnie Générale Transatlantique. The ship was the first major ocean liner built after the conclusion of World War I, and was the first liner ever to be decorated entirely with designs associated with the Art Deco
Art Deco
style
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Mulatto
No official worldwide censusRegions with significant populations Latin
Latin
America, Caribbean, United States, South Africa, Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Mozambique, Guinea-Bissau, Mascarene Islands, United Kingdom, France, Portugal, NamibiaLanguageslanguages of Africa, languages of Asia, languages of EuropeRelated ethnic groupspardo Mulatto
Mulatto
is a term used to refer to people born of one white parent and one black parent or to people born of a mulatto parent or parents
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Interracial Marriage In The United States
Interracial marriage
Interracial marriage
in the United States
United States
has been legal in all U.S. states since the 1967 Supreme Court decision Loving v. Virginia
Loving v. Virginia
that deemed "anti-miscegenation" laws unconstitutional. The proportion of interracial marriages as a proportion of all marriages has been increasing since, such that 15.1% of all new marriages in the United States were interracial marriages by 2010 compared to a low single-digit percentage in the mid 20th century. Public approval of interracial marriage rose from around 5% in the 1950s to around 80% in the 2000s
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