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Wanyin
Wanyin was a Shan state in what is today Burma. It belonged to the Central Division of the Southern Shan States. References[edit]Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010
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Shan People
The Shan (Shan: တႆး; Shan pronunciation: [táj], Burmese: ရှမ်းလူမျိုး; [ʃán lùmjó]; Thai: ไทใหญ่ or ฉาน; Chinese: 掸族 or 傣族; pinyin: Shànzú, Dǎizú) are a Tai ethnic group of Southeast Asia. The Shan live primarily in the Shan State
Shan State
of Burma
Burma
(Myanmar), but also inhabit parts of Mandalay Region, Kachin State, and Kayin State, and in adjacent regions of China, Laos
Laos
and Thailand.[3] Though no reliable census has been taken in Burma
Burma
since 1935, the Shan are estimated to number 4–6 million,[1] with CIA Factbook
CIA Factbook
giving an estimation of 5 million spread throughout Myanmar.[2] The capital of Shan State
Shan State
is Taunggyi, the fifth-largest city in Myanmar
Myanmar
with about 390,000 people
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Petty Kingdoms
A petty kingdom is a kingdom described as minor or "petty" by contrast to an empire or unified kingdom that either preceded or succeeded it (e.g. the numerous kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
unified into the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
in the 10th century, or the numerous Gaelic kingdoms of Ireland
Ireland
unified under the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
as the Kingdom of Ireland
Kingdom of Ireland
in the 16th)
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Burma
Myanmar
Myanmar
(Burmese: [mjəmà]),[nb 1][8] officially the Republic
Republic
of the Union of Myanmar
Myanmar
and also known as Burma, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia. Myanmar
Myanmar
is bordered by India
India
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to its west, Thailand
Thailand
and Laos
Laos
to its east and China
China
to its north and northeast. To its south, about one third of Myanmar's total perimeter of 5,876 km (3,651 mi) forms an uninterrupted coastline of 1,930 km (1,200 mi) along the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
and the Andaman Sea. The country's 2014 census counted the population to be 51 million people.[9] As of 2017, the population is about 54 million.[5] Myanmar is 676,578 square kilometres (261,228 square miles) in size
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Loi-ai
Loi-ai
Loi-ai
(also known as Lwe-e) was a Shan state in the Myelat
Myelat
region of what is today Burma. It was one of the westernmost Shan states, bordering with Yamethin district of Upper Burma. The capital was Lonpo (Aungpan) and the population was mostly Pa-O, but there were also Danu, Shan and Karen people
Karen people
in the area.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Rulers1.1.1 Ngwegunhmus2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] Loi-ai
Loi-ai
was a subsidiary state of Yawnghwe, another state of the Myelat division of the Southern Shan States. Loi ai State merged with Hsamönghkam State in 1930.[2] Rulers[edit] The rulers bore the title Ngwegunhmu.[3] Ngwegunhmus[edit].... - .... Maung Baung [1st ruler] .... - .... Maung Maing .... - 1814 Paw Kyi 1814 - 1834 Maung Shwe 1834 - 1864 Kaw Thaw 1864 - 1868 Maung Kaing (d
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Mongping State
Mongping or Möngping (Burmese: Maingpyin) was small state of the Shan States in what is today Burma. History[edit] Little is known about the history of this state except that in 1842 it was merged with Lawksawk.[1] It was located at the southeastern end of that state, separated from it by the Nam Et River. Rulers[edit]1835 - 1842 Hkam Hlaing 1842 - .... Hkam KawReferences[edit]^ Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma"
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Mongpai
Mongpai was a Shan state in what is today Burma. It belonged to the Central Division of the Southern Shan States.[1] References[edit]^ Imperial Gazetteer of India, v. 17, p. 406.Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010
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Namhkok
Namhkok (also known as Nankok) was a Shan state in what is today Burma. References[edit]Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010. Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "The Imperial Gazetteer of India". Digital South Asia Library, University of Chicago
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Nawngwawn
Nawngwawn (also known as Naungwun or Naungmon) was a Shan state in what is today Burma. References[edit]Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010
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Sa-koi
Sa-koi (also known as Sagwe) was a small Shan state in what is today Burma. It belonged to the Central Division of the Southern Shan States. References[edit]Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010
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Samka (state)
Samka (Burmese: Saga) was a Shan state in the Central Division of the Southern Shan States
Shan States
in what is today Burma. References[edit]Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010
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Hsamonghkam
Hsamonghkam or Hsamönghkam (also known as Thamaingkan) was a Shan state in the Myelat
Myelat
region of Burma. Its capital was Aungban. Hsamonghkam was established before 1700 CE. During the 18th and 19th centuries it was a tributary of Burma. In 1886, following the fall of the Konbaung dynasty, it submitted to British rule. It became a part of the unified Shan State
Shan State
within Burma
Burma
in 1947. Sao Htun Aye, The last myosa of Hsamonghkam, abdicated and surrendered his powers to the Burmese government on 29 April 1959. References[edit]Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma"
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Kyawkku State
Kyawkku
Kyawkku
(also known as Kyawkku
Kyawkku
Hsiwan or Kyakku) was a Shan state in the Myelat
Myelat
region of what is today Burma. Its capital was the village of Kyawkku
Kyawkku
(Myinkyado) which had 344 inhabitants in 1901. History[edit] Kyawkku
Kyawkku
was founded around 1600 CE. It was a tributary of Burma
Burma
until 1887, when the Shan states
Shan states
submitted to British rule after the fall of the Konbaung dynasty. The state was merged with Poila in 1922.[1] Rulers[edit] The title of Kyawkku's rulers was Ngwegunhmu.[2].... - .... Nga San Bon .... - .... Nga San Mya ...
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Kyong
Kyong
Kyong
(also known as Kyon) was a Shan state in the Myelat
Myelat
region of what is today Burma.[1] Rulers[edit] The title of Kyong's rulers was Ngwegunhmu.[2].... - .... Maung Aung Hla .... - 1867 Maung San Nyun 1867 - .... Maung Po (b. 1841 - d. ....) c.1910 Maung KaingReferences[edit]^ "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010. Retrieved 21 December 2010.  ^ Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma"
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Loimaw
Loimaw (also known as Lwemaw) was a Shan state in the Myelat
Myelat
region of what is today Burma. Its capital was Minywa. Its population was mostly Pa-O. References[edit]Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010. Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "The Imperial Gazetteer of India". Digital South Asia Library, University of Chicago
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Loilong
Loilong (also known as Lwelong) was a Shan state in the Myelat
Myelat
region of what is today Burma. Its capital was Pinlaung. It had a large Pa-O population. References[edit]Ben Cahoon (2000). "World Statesmen.org: Shan and Karenni States
Karenni States
of Burma". Retrieved 21 December 2010.  "WHKMLA : History of the Shan States". 18 May 2010
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