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Wallkill River
The Wallkill River, a tributary of the Hudson, drains Lake Mohawk in Sparta, New Jersey, flowing from there generally northeasterly 88.3 miles (142.1 km)[1] to Rondout Creek
Rondout Creek
in New York, just downstream of Sturgeon Pool, near Rosendale, with the combined flows reaching the Hudson at Kingston. The river is unusual because it flows north between two major south-flowing rivers, the Hudson and the Delaware River. It also has the unusual distinction of being a river that drains into a creek, due to being impounded shortly before the Rondout confluence into a small body of water called Sturgeon Pool
Sturgeon Pool
near Rifton, and what reaches the Rondout from there is the lesser flow.Contents1 Course 2 History 3 Cleanup 4 Tributaries 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksCourse[edit]The Wallkill near floodstage in September 2006, in the National Wildlife Preserve, in Sussex County, NJ
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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Industry
Industry
Industry
is the production of goods or related services within an economy.[1] The major source of revenue of a group or company is the indicator of its relevant industry.[2] When a large group has multiple sources of revenue generation, it is considered to be working in different industries. Manufacturing
Manufacturing
industry became a key sector of production and labour in European and North American countries during the Industrial Revolution, upsetting previous mercantile and feudal economies
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New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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Dam
A dam is a barrier that stops or restricts the flow of water or underground streams. Reservoirs created by dams not only suppress floods but also provide water for activities such as irrigation, human consumption, industrial use, aquaculture, and navigability. Hydropower is often used in conjunction with dams to generate electricity. A dam can also be used to collect water or for storage of water which can be evenly distributed between locations. Dams generally serve the primary purpose of retaining water, while other structures such as floodgates or levees (also known as dikes) are used to manage or prevent water flow into specific land regions. The word dam can be traced back to Middle English,[1] and before that, from Middle Dutch, as seen in the names of many old cities.[2] The first known appearance of dam occurs in 1165. However, there is one village, Obdam, that is already mentioned in 1120
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Confluence
In geography, a confluence (also: conflux) occurs where two or more flowing bodies of water join together to form a single channel.[1] A confluence can occur in several configurations: at the point where a tributary joins a larger river (main stem); or where two streams meet to become the source of a river of a new name (such as the confluence of the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers at Pittsburgh, forming the Ohio); or where two separated channels of a river (forming a river island) rejoin at the downstream end.Contents1 Scientific study of confluences1.1 Confluence
Confluence
Flow Zones (River)2 Confluences and humankind 3 Notable confluences3.1 Africa 3.2 Asia 3.3 Australia 3.4 Europe 3.5 North America 3.6 South America4 Confluences not of two rivers 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksScientific study of confluences[edit] Confluences are studied in a variety of sciences
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Appalachian Mountains
The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
(/ˌæpəˈlæʃɪn, -ˈleɪtʃɪn/ ( listen);[note 1] French: les Appalaches), often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern North America. The Appalachians first formed roughly 480 million years ago during the Ordovician
Ordovician
Period. They once reached elevations similar to those of the Alps
Alps
and the Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
before experiencing natural erosion.[3][4] The Appalachian chain is a barrier to east-west travel, as it forms a series of alternating ridgelines and valleys oriented in opposition to most highways and railroads running east-west. Definitions vary on the precise boundaries of the Appalachians
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New York-New Jersey Highlands
The New York – New Jersey Highlands is a geological formation composed primarily of Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rock running from the Delaware River near Musconetcong Mountain, northeast through the Skylands Region of New Jersey along the Bearfort Ridge and the Ramapo Mountains, Sterling Forest, Harriman and Bear Mountain State Parks in New York, to the Hudson River at Storm King Mountain. The northern region is also known as the Hudson Highlands and the southern as the New Jersey Highlands. A broader definition would extend the region west to Reading, Pennsylvania, and east to the Housatonic River in Connecticut, encompassing the Reading Prong. In New Jersey, the region's watershed is protected by the state's own Highlands Water Protection and Planning Act
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Agriculture
Agriculture
Agriculture
is the cultivation and breeding of animals and plants to provide food, fiber, medicinal plants and other products to sustain and enhance life.[1] Agriculture
Agriculture
was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The study of agriculture is known as agricultural science. The history of agriculture dates back thousands of years; people gathered wild grains at least 105,000 years ago, and began to plant them around 11,500 years ago, before they became domesticated. Pigs, sheep, and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago. Crops originate from at least 11 regions of the world
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New York State Electric And Gas
New York State Electric and Gas (NYSEG) is an electric and gas utility company owned by Avangrid that serves customers in New York. NYSEG was incorporated in 1852 as the Ithaca Gas Light Company. Throughout the end of the 19th century and the early part of the 20th century, the corporation went through mergers and acquisitions that combined about 200 utility companies under the name NYSEG. In 1975 the corporation became an 18% partner in the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation’s Nine Mile Point nuclear plant, and in the 1980s NYSEG completed a series of hydroelectric power plants.[1] In 2008 NYSEG became part of Iberdrola, when Iberdrola bought Energy East.[2] References[edit]^ "History of NYSEG". lipsitzponterio.com. Retrieved October 20, 2017.  ^ Jelter, Jim. "Iberdrola to buy Energy East for $4.5 billion". marketwatch.com
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Tributary
A tributary[1] or affluent[2] is a stream or river that flows into a larger stream or main stem (or parent) river or a lake.[3] A tributary does not flow directly into a sea or ocean.[4] Tributaries and the main stem river drain the surrounding drainage basin of its surface water and groundwater, leading the water out into an ocean. A confluence, where two or more bodies of water meet together, usually refers to the joining of tributaries. The opposite to a tributary is a distributary, a river or stream that branches off from and flows away from the main stream.[5] Distributaries are most often found in river deltas.Contents1 Terminology 2 Ordering and enumeration 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesTerminology[edit]Looking downstream, the Shenandoah River
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Shawangunk Ridge
The Shawangunk Ridge
Ridge
/ˈʃɑːwəŋɡʌŋk/, also known as the Shawangunk Mountains or The Gunks,[1] is a ridge of bedrock in Ulster County, Sullivan County and Orange County in the state of New York, extending from the northernmost point of New Jersey
New Jersey
to the Catskill Mountains. Shawangunk Ridge
Ridge
is the continuation of the long, easternmost ridge of the Appalachian Mountains; the ridge is known as Kittatinny Mountain
Kittatinny Mountain
in New Jersey, and as Blue Mountain as it continues through Pennsylvania. This ridge constitutes the western border of the Great Appalachian Valley.Shawangunk Ridge
Ridge
is designated by the dashed red lines.The ridgetop, which widens considerably at its northern end, has many public and private protected areas and is not heavily populated. Its only settlement of consequence is unincorporated Cragsmoor
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Floodplain
A floodplain or flood plain is an area of land adjacent to a stream or river which stretches from the banks of its channel to the base of the enclosing valley walls and which experiences flooding during periods of high discharge.[1] The soils usually consist of levees, silts, and sands deposited during floods. Levees are the heaviest materials (usually pebble-size) and they are deposited first; silts and sands are finer materials.Contents1 Formation 2 Ecology 3 Interaction with society 4 See also 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 External linksFormation[edit] Floodplains are made by a meander eroding sideways as it travels downstream. When a river breaks its banks, it leaves behind layers of alluvium (silt). These gradually build up to create the floor of the plain. Floodplains generally contain unconsolidated sediments, often extending below the bed of the stream
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Minisink, New York
Minisink is a town located in southwest Orange County, New York northeast of the New Jersey border between the Town of Greenville and the Town of Warwick. The population was 4,490 at the 2010 census. The town is located near Interstate 84 and New York State Route 17 and lies about halfway between New York City and Scranton, Pa.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Government 5 Federal, State, and County Representation 6 Former Town Supervisors 7 Education 8 Communities and locations in Minisink 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Historically, the name Minisink, which dates to the mid 17th century, has applied to a much larger area than the current town, running as far north as Minisink Ford, twenty miles northwest of present-day Minisink, south to the Delaware Water Gap, thirty miles southwest of present-day Minisink, and from the Kittatinny Ridge to the east to the Pocono Mountains to the west (See [1])
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Town (New York)
The administrative divisions of New York are the various units of government that provide local government services in the state of New York. The state is divided into counties, cities, towns, and villages. Cities, towns and villages are municipal corporations with their own governments that provide most local government services.[1] Whether a municipality is defined as a city, town, or village is dependent not on population or land area, but rather on the form of government selected by the residents and approved by the state legislature.[2][3][4] Each such government is granted varying home rule powers as provided by the New York Constitution.[5] New York has various corporate entities that serve single purposes that are also local governments, such as school and fire districts.[5] New York has 62 counties,[6][7] which are subdivided into 932 towns[4] and 62 cities;[3] it also has 10 Indian reservations.[8] In total, the state has more than 3,400 active local governments and more than
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Hamlet (place)
A hamlet is a small human settlement. In different jurisdictions and geographies, hamlets may be the size of a town, village or parish, be considered a smaller settlement or subdivision of a larger, or be treated as a satellite entity to a larger settlement. The word and concept of a hamlet have roots in the Anglo-Norman settlement of England, where the old French hamlet came to apply to small human settlements. In British geography, a hamlet is considered smaller than a village and distinctly without a church.Contents1 Etymology 2 Australia 3 Canada 4 France 5 Germany 6 India 7 Indonesia 8 Pakistan 9 Romania 10 Switzerland 11 Ukraine 12 United Kingdom 13 United States13.1 Mississippi 13.2 New York 13.3 Oregon14 Vietnam 15 See also 16 References 17 External linksEtymology[edit] The word comes from Anglo-Norman hamelet(t)e, corresponding to Old French hamelet, the diminutive of Old French
Old French
hamel
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