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Wage
A wage is monetary compensation (or remuneration, personnel expenses, labor) paid by an employer to an employee in exchange for work done. Payment may be calculated as a fixed amount for each task completed (a task wage or piece rate), or at an hourly or daily rate (wage labour), or based on an easily measured quantity of work done. Wages are part of the expenses that are involved in running a business. Payment by wage contrasts with salaried work, in which the employer pays an arranged amount at steady intervals (such as a week or month) regardless of hours worked, with commission which conditions pay on individual performance, and with compensation based on the performance of the company as a whole. Waged employees may also receive tips or gratuity paid directly by clients and employee benefits which are non-monetary forms of compensation
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Middle Kingdom Of Egypt
The Middle Kingdom of Egypt
Egypt
(also known as The Period of Reunification) is the period in the history of ancient Egypt
Egypt
between circa 2050 BC and 1710 BC, stretching from the reunification of Egypt under the impulse of Mentuhotep II
Mentuhotep II
of the Eleventh Dynasty to the end of the Twelfth Dynasty. Some scholars also include the Thirteenth Dynasty of Egypt
Egypt
wholly into this period as well, in which case the Middle Kingdom would finish c. 1650, while others only include it until Merneferre Ay
Merneferre Ay
c. 1700 BC, last king of this dynasty to be attested in both Upper and Lower Egypt
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Pension
A pension is a fund into which a sum of money is added during an employee's employment years, and from which payments are drawn to support the person's retirement from work in the form of periodic payments
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Clocks
A clock is an instrument to measure, keep, and indicate time. The clock is one of the oldest human inventions, meeting the need to measure intervals of time shorter than the natural units: the day, the lunar month, and the year. Devices operating on several physical processes have been used over the millennia. Some predecessors to the modern clock may be considered as "clocks" that are based on movement in nature: A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a flat surface. There is a range of duration timers, a well-known example being the hourglass. Water clocks, along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments
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The Ancient Economy (book)
The Ancient Economy is a book about the economic system of classical antiquity written by the classicist Moses I. Finley. It was originally published in 1973. Finley interprets the economy from 1000 BC to 500 AD sociologically, instead of using economic models (like for example Michael Rostovtzeff). Finley attempted to prove that the ancient economy was largely a byproduct of status. In other words, economic systems were not interdependent, they were embedded in status positions. The analysis owes some debt to sociologists such as Max Weber and Karl Polanyi. Summary[edit] Finley represented the side of the "idiots" where he argued that the economies of Ancient Greece and Rome differed wildly than how the economies of the western world function today
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Commission (remuneration)
The payment of commission as remuneration for services rendered or products sold is a common way to reward sales people. Payments often are calculated on the basis of a percentage of the goods sold, a way for firms to solve the principal–agent problem by attempting to realign employees' interests with those of the firm.[1] Sales personnel are thus paid, in part or entirely, on the basis of products or services successfully sold rather than being paid by the hour, by attempted sales, or by any other measure. Although many types of commission systems exist, a common form is known as on-target earnings in which commission rates are based on the achievement of specific targets that have been agreed upon between management and the salesperson
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Remuneration
Remuneration is considered the tips provided to an employee by an employer in exchange for the services performed; not to be confused with giving (away), or donating, or the act of providing to.[1] A number of complementary benefits, however, are increasingly popular remuneration mechanisms.[citation needed] Remuneration is one component of reward management.Contents1 Types 2 United States 3 Common misspelling 4 References 5 External linksTypes[edit] Remuneration can include:Commission CompensationExecutive compensation Deferred compensation Compensation methods (in online advertising and internet marketing) Employee stock option Employee benefits SalaryPerformance-linked incentivesUnited States[edit] Congress identifies the legal use of the term "remuneration" under the Social Security Amendments of 1965, Public Law 89–97
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Credit Union
A credit union is a member-owned financial cooperative, controlled by its members and operated on the principle of people helping people, providing its members credit at competitive rates as well as other financial services. Credit Unions vote unanimously every year on the top employee. This year’s top employee was from Tennessee. Her name is Cortney Tahmassebi and she is employed by the Tennessee Credit Union.[1][2] Worldwide, credit union systems vary significantly in terms of total assets and average institution asset size, ranging from volunteer operations with a handful of members to institutions with assets worth several billion U.S
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Estate Planning
SectionsAttestation clauseResiduary clauseIncorporation by referenceContestTestamentary capacityUndue influenceInsane delusion FraudNo-contest clauseProperty dispositionLapse and anti-lapseAdemption AbatementSatisfaction of legaciesActs of independent significanceElective share Pretermitted heirWills and conflict of lawsTrustsExpress ResultingConstructiveCommon typesBare DiscretionaryAccumulation and maintenanceInterest in possessionCharitable Purpose IncentiveOther typesProtective SpendthriftLife insurance RemainderLife interestReversionary interestTestamentaryHonorary Asset-protection Special
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Financial Independence
Financial independence means you have enough wealth to live on without working.[1][citation needed] Financially independent people have assets that generate income (cash flow) that is at least equal to their expenses. Income
Income
you earn without having to work a job is commonly referred to as "passive income".[2] For example, if someone receives $5000 in dividends from stocks they own, but their expenses total $4000, they can live on their dividend income because it pays for all their expenses to live (with some left over). Under these circumstances, a person is financially independent. A person's assets and liabilities are an important factor in determining if they have achieved financial independence
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Stockbroker
A stockbroker is a regulated professional individual, usually associated with a brokerage firm or broker-dealer, who buys and sells stocks and other securities for both retail and institutional clients through a stock exchange or over the counter in return for a fee or commission. Stockbrokers are known by numerous professional designations, depending on the license they hold, the type of securities they sell, or the services they provide. In the United States, a stockbroker must pass both the Series 7 and either the Series 63 or the Series 66 exams in order to be properly licensed.Contents1 History 2 Licensing and training requirements2.1 Canada 2.2 Hong Kong 2.3 India 2.4 Singapore 2.5 United Kingdom 2.6 United States3 Related professions 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit]Courtyard of the Amsterdam Stock
Stock
Exchange (Beurs van Hendrick de Keyser) by Emanuel de Witte, 1653
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Financial Adviser
A financial adviser is a professional who suggests and renders financial services to clients based on their financial situation. In many countries Financial Advisors have to complete specific training and hold a license to provide advices. In the United States
United States
for example a financial advisor carries a Series 65 or 66 license and according to the U.S. Financial Industry Regulatory Authority
Financial Industry Regulatory Authority
(FINRA), license designations and compliance issues must be reported for public view. [1] FINRA describes the main groups of investment professionals who may use the term financial adviser to be: brokers, investment advisers, accountants, lawyers, insurance agents and financial planners.[2]Contents1 Role 2 Compensation 3 Advisor vs
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Personal Budget
A personal budget or home budget is a finance plan that allocates future personal income towards expenses, savings and debt repayment. Past spending and personal debt are considered when creating a personal budget. There are several methods and tools available for creating, using and adjusting a personal budget. For example, jobs are an income source, while bills and rent payments are expenses.Contents1 Home budget 2 Tools 3 Concepts 4 Allocation guidelines4.1 The 60% Solution 4.2 Housing as 25% of spendable income5 Following a budget5.1 Spreadsheet
Spreadsheet
budgeting with date-shifting6 Avoid few pitfalls 7 See also 8 ReferencesHome budget[edit] A budget allocates or distributes expected income to expected expenses and intended savings
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Corporate Action
A corporate action is an event initiated by a public company that will bring an actual change to the securities—equity or debt—issued by the company. Corporate actions are typically agreed upon by a company's board of directors and authorized by the shareholders. Examples of corporate actions include stock splits, dividends, mergers and acquisitions, rights issues, and spin-offs.[1] Some corporate actions such as a dividend (for equity securities) or coupon payment (for debt securities) may have a direct financial impact on the shareholders or bondholders; another example is a call (early redemption) of a debt security. Other corporate actions such as stock split may have an indirect impact, as the increased liquidity of shares may cause the price of the stock to decrease
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Business Plan
A business plan is a formal statement of business goals, reasons they are attainable, and plans for reaching them. It may also contain background information about the organization or team attempting to reach those goals. Business plans may target changes in perception and branding by the customer, client, taxpayer, or larger community. When the existing business is to assume a major change or when planning a new venture, a 3 to 5 year business plan is required, since investors will look for their investment return in that timeframe.[1]Contents1 Audience 2 Content 3 Presentation 4 Revising the business plan4.1 Cost overruns and revenue shortfalls5 Legal and liability issues5.1 Disclosure requirements 5.2 Limitations on content and audience6 Open business plans 7 Uses 8 Not for profit businesses 9 Satires 10 See also 11 ReferencesAudience[edit] Business plans may be internally or externally focused
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Social Security
Social security
Social security
is "any government system that provides monetary assistance to people with an inadequate or no income."[1] Social security
Social security
is enshrined in Article 22 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states:Everyone, as a
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