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WSWG
Valdosta/Albany/ Moultrie/Tifton, Georgia United StatesCity ValdostaBranding WSWG
WSWG
(general) WCTV
WCTV
Eyewitness News WSWG
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Semi-satellite
A broadcast relay station, satellite station, relay transmitter, broadcast translator (U.S.), rebroadcaster (Canada), repeater (two-way radio), or complementary station (Mexico) is a broadcast transmitter which repeats, or transponds, the signal of another radio station or television station usually to an area not covered by the signal of the originating station. They may serve, for example, to expand the broadcast range of a television or radio station beyond the primary signal's coverage area, or to improve service in a part of the main coverage area which receives a poor signal due to geographic constraints. These transmitters may be, but are not usually, used to create a single-frequency network. They may also be used by a radio station on either AM or FM to establish a presence on the other band. Sometimes, a rebroadcaster may be owned by a community group rather than the owner of the primary station
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List Of Broadcast Station Classes
This is a list of broadcast station classes applicable in much of North America under international agreements between the United States, Canada and Mexico. Effective radiated power
Effective radiated power
(ERP) and height above average terrain (HAAT) are listed unless otherwise noted. All radio and television stations within 320 kilometers (about 200 miles) of the US-Canada or US-Mexico border
US-Mexico border
must get approval by both the domestic and foreign agency
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Dark (broadcasting)
In the broadcasting industry, a dark television or silent radio station is one that has gone off the air for an indefinite period of time. Usually unlike dead air (broadcasting only silence), a station that is dark or silent does not even transmit a carrier signal.Contents1 U.S. law1.1 Transmitter operations 1.2 Tower-light markings 1.3 Telecommunications Act of 19962 See also 3 ReferencesU.S. law[edit] Transmitter operations[edit] According to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC), a radio or television station is considered to have gone dark or silent if it is to be off the air for 30 days or longer. Prior to the Telecommunications Act of 1996, a "dark" station was required to surrender its broadcast license to the FCC, leaving it vulnerable to another party applying for it while its current owner was making efforts to get it back on the air
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The WB Television Network
The WB
The WB
Television Network (commonly shortened to The WB
The WB
and short for Warner Bros.) was an American television network that was first launched on broadcast television on January 11, 1995,[4] as a joint venture between the Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Entertainment division of Time Warner and the Tribune Broadcasting
Tribune Broadcasting
subsidiary of the Tribune Company, with the former acting as controlling partner
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UPN
The United Paramount Network
Paramount Network
(UPN) was an American broadcast television network that launched on January 16, 1995. The network was originally owned by Chris-Craft Industries/United Television; then Viacom
Viacom
(through its Paramount Television
Paramount Television
unit, which produced most of the network's series) turned the network into a joint venture in 1996 after acquiring a 50% stake in the network, and then purchased Chris-Craft's remaining stake in 2000
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Effective Radiated Power
Effective radiated power
Effective radiated power
(ERP), synonymous with equivalent radiated power, is an IEEE standardized definition of directional radio frequency (RF) power, such as that emitted by a radio transmitter. It is the total power in watts that would have to be radiated by a half-wave dipole antenna to give the same radiation intensity (signal strength in watts per square meter) as the actual source at a distant receiver located in the direction of the antenna's strongest beam (main lobe). ERP measures the combination of the power emitted by the transmitter and the ability of the antenna to direct that power in a given direction. It is equal to the input power to the antenna multiplied by the gain of the antenna
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Kilowatt
The watt (symbol: W) is a unit of power. In the International System of Units (SI) it is defined as a derived unit of 1 joule per second,[1] and is used to quantify the rate of energy transfer
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Height Above Average Terrain
Height above average terrain
Height above average terrain
(HAAT) (or less popularly, EHAAT, Effective Height Above Average Terrain) is a measure of how high an antenna site is above the surrounding landscape. HAAT is used extensively in FM radio
FM radio
and television, as it is more important than effective radiated power (ERP) in determining the range of broadcasts (VHF and UHF in particular, as they are line of sight transmissions). For international coordination, it is officially measured in meters, even by the Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
in the United States, as Canada
Canada
and Mexico
Mexico
have extensive border zones where stations can be received on either side of the international boundaries
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Metre
The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling[1]) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). The SI unit symbol is m.[2] The metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 second.[1] The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole. In 1799, it was redefined in terms of a prototype metre bar (the actual bar used was changed in 1889). In 1960, the metre was redefined in terms of a certain number of wavelengths of a certain emission line of krypton-86. In 1983, the current definition was adopted. The imperial inch is defined as 0.0254 metres (2.54 centimetres or 25.4 millimetres). One metre is about ​3 3⁄8 inches longer than a yard, i.e
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Foot (unit)
The foot (pl. feet; abbreviation: ft; symbol: ′, the prime symbol) is a unit of length in the imperial and US customary systems of measurement. Since 1959, both units have been defined by international agreement as equivalent to 0.3048 meters exactly. In both systems, the foot comprises 12 inches and three feet compose a yard. Historically the "foot" was a part of many local systems of units, including the Greek, Roman, Chinese, French, and English systems. It varied in length from country to country, from city to city, and sometimes from trade to trade
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Digital Television
Digital television
Digital television
(DTV) is the transmission of television signals, including the sound channel, using digital encoding, in contrast to the earlier television technology, analog television, in which the video and audio are carried by analog signals. It is an innovative advance that represents the first significant evolution in television technology since color television in the 1950s.[1] Digital TV makes more economical use of scarce radio spectrum space; it can transmit multiple channels in the same bandwidth occupied by a single channel of analog television,[2] and provides many new features that analog television cannot. A switchover from analog to digital broadcasting began around 2006 in some countries, and many industrial countries have now completed the changeover, while other countries are in various stages of adaptation
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Call Sign
In broadcasting and radio communications, a call sign (also known as a call name or call letters—and historically as a call signal—or abbreviated as a call) is a unique designation for a transmitter station. In the United States of America, they are used for all FCC-licensed transmitters.[1] A call sign can be formally assigned by a government agency, informally adopted by individuals or organizations, or even cryptographically encoded to disguise a station's identity. The use of call signs as unique identifiers dates to the landline railroad telegraph system. Because there was only one telegraph line linking all railroad stations, there needed to be a way to address each one when sending a telegram. In order to save time, two-letter identifiers were adopted for this purpose. This pattern continued in radiotelegraph operation; radio companies initially assigned two-letter identifiers to coastal stations and stations aboard ships at sea
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Facility ID
The facility ID number, also called a FIN or facility identifier, is a unique integer number[1] of one to six digits,[2] assigned by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) Media Bureau[1] to each broadcast station in the FCC's Consolidated Database System (CDBS). Because CDBS includes information about foreign stations which are notified to the U.S. under the terms of international frequency coordination agreements, FINs are also assigned to affected foreign stations. However, this has no legal significance, and the numbers are not used by the regulatory authorities in those other countries. Current FCC practice is to assign facility ID numbers sequentially, but this is not an official requirement, so third-party users must not rely on it
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Television Station
A television station is a set of equipment managed by a business, organisation or other entity, such as an amateur television (ATV) operator, that transmits video content via radio waves directly from a transmitter on the earth's surface to a receiver on earth. Most often the term refers to a station which broadcasts structured content to an audience or it refers to the organization that operates the station. A terrestrial television transmission can occur via analog television signals or, more recently, via digital television signals. Television stations are differentiated from cable television or other video providers in that their content is broadcast via terrestrial radio waves
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Southwest Georgia
Southwest Georgia
Southwest Georgia
is a fourteen-county region in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Georgia. It has a 2010 census population of 496,433, and is the least populated region in Georgia, just slightly behind Southeast Georgia. Additionally, the area has historically been the poorest region of the state since at least 1995, when over 25% of the residents were in poverty. It is commonly referred to as SOWEGA, pronounced "Sow WEE guh". Southwest Georgia
Southwest Georgia
is anchored by Albany, the most populous city and region's sole metropolitan area.Contents1 Major cities 2 Metropolitan Areas 3 Micropolitan Statistical Areas 4 Counties 5 ReferencesMajor cities[edit]Albany- Pop. 77,434 Thomasville- Pop. 19,398 Moultrie- Pop. 15,405 Bainbridge- Pop. 15,697Metropolitan Areas[edit]Albany Metropolitan Area- Pop. 157,688Micropolitan Statistical Areas[edit]Moultrie Micropolitan Statistical Area- Pop
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