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WHYY-FM
WHYY-FM
WHYY-FM
(90.9 FM, "91 FM") is a public FM radio station licensed to serve Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Its broadcast tower is located in the city's Roxborough neighborhood at (40°02′30.9″N 75°14′21.9″W / 40.041917°N 75.239417°W / 40.041917; -75.239417 (Roxborough)),[1] while its studios and offices are located on Independence Mall in Center City, Philadelphia. The station, owned by WHYY, Inc., is a charter member of National Public Radio (NPR) and contributes several programs to the national network.Contents1 History 2 Programs produced 3 Format change 4 CEO controversy 5 New Jersey
New Jersey
expansion and controversy 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] WHYY signed on the air on December 14, 1954, owned by the Metropolitan Philadelphia Educational Radio and Television Corporation.[2] It was the first broadcasting station in Philadelphia devoted solely to education
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City Of License
In American, Canadian and Philippine broadcasting, a city of license or community of license is the community that a radio station or television station is officially licensed to serve by that country's broadcast regulator. In North American broadcast law, the concept of community of license dates to the early days of AM radio
AM radio
broadcasting. The requirement that a broadcasting station operate a main studio within a prescribed distance of the community which the station is licensed to serve appears in U.S
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Philadelphia Daily News
The Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Daily News is a tabloid newspaper that serves Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. The newspaper is owned by Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Media Network, which also owns Philadelphia's other major newspaper The Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Inquirer. The Daily News began publishing on March 31, 1925, under founding editor Lee Ellmaker. By 1930, the newspaper's circulation exceeded 200,000, but by the 1950s the news paper was losing money. In 1954, the newspaper was sold to Matthew McCloskey and then sold again in 1957 to publisher Walter Annenberg. In 1969, Annenberg sold the Daily News to Knight Ridder. In 2006 Knight Ridder
Knight Ridder
sold the paper to a group of local investors. The Daily News has won the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
three times
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Roxborough, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(/ˌpɛnsɪlˈveɪniə/ ( listen); Pennsylvania German: Pennsylvaani or Pennsilfaani), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware
Delaware
to the southeast, Maryland
Maryland
to the south, West Virginia
West Virginia
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the west, Lake Erie
Lake Erie
and the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey
New Jersey
to the east. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
is the 33rd-largest, the 5th-most populous, and the 9th-most densely populated of the 50 United States
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Independence Mall (Philadelphia)
Independence Mall is a three-block section of Independence National Historical Park (INHP) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It lies directly north of Independence Hall, and is bounded by Chestnut, Race, 5th and 6th Streets. The south block is called the First Block, the middle block is called the Second Block, and the north block is called the Third Block.[citation needed] Buildings and structures on the Mall include the National Constitution Center (3rd block); the Independence Visitor Center
Independence Visitor Center
and the Free Quaker Meetinghouse (2nd Block); and the President's House Memorial and the Liberty Bell
Liberty Bell
Center (1st Block)
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Sign-on
A sign-on (or start-up) is the beginning of operations for a radio or television station, generally at the start of each day. It is the opposite of a sign-off (or closedown), which is the sequence of operations involved when a radio or television station shuts down its transmitters and goes off the air for a predetermined period; generally, this occurs during the overnight hours.Contents1 Sign-on1.1 Sign-on sequence2 Sign-off2.1 Sign-off sequence3 Special
Special
sign-on/off cases3.1 Historical3.1.1 2000 Today3.2 Religious3.2.1 India 3.2.2 Malaysia 3.2.3 Philippines4 See also 5 External linksSign-on[edit] Sign-ons, like sign-offs, vary from country to country, from station to station, and from time to time; however, most follow a similar general pattern. Many stations follow the reverse process to their sign-off sequence at the close of the day
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Federal Communications Commission
The Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) is an independent agency of the United States government created by statute (47 U.S.C. § 151 and 47 U.S.C. § 154) to regulate interstate communications by radio, television, wire, satellite, and cable. The FCC
FCC
works towards six goals in the areas of broadband, competition, the spectrum, the media, public safety and homeland security, and modernizing itself.[4] The FCC
FCC
was formed by the Communications Act of 1934
Communications Act of 1934
to replace the radio regulation functions of the Federal Radio Commission. The FCC took over wire communication regulation from the Interstate Commerce Commission. The FCC's mandated jurisdiction covers the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the Territories of the United States
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All Things Considered
All Things Considered
All Things Considered
(ATC) is the flagship news program on the American network National Public Radio
National Public Radio
(NPR). It was the first news program on NPR, premiering on May 3, 1971. It is broadcast live on NPR affiliated stations in the United States, and worldwide through several different outlets, including the NPR
NPR
Berlin station in Germany.[1] All Things Considered
All Things Considered
and Morning Edition
Morning Edition
were the highest rated public radio programs in the United States
United States
in 2002 and 2005.[2][3] The show combines news, analysis, commentary, interviews, and special features, and its segments vary in length and style. ATC airs weekdays from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m
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National Constitution Center
The National Constitution Center
National Constitution Center
is a nonprofit, nonpartisan institution devoted to the United States Constitution. On Independence Mall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the center is an interactive museum and a national town hall for constitutional dialogue, hosting government leaders, journalists, scholars, and celebrities for public discussions (including presidential debates). The center houses the Annenberg Center for Education and Outreach, which offers civic learning resources onsite and online. It does not house the original Constitution, which is stored at the National Archives Building
National Archives Building
in Washington, D.C. The groundbreaking ceremony (attended by President Bill Clinton)[1] was held on September 17, 2000, the 213th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution
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Philadelphia (magazine)
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(also called " Philadelphia
Philadelphia
magazine" or referred to by the nickname "Phillymag") is a regional monthly magazine published in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
by the Lipson family of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
and its company, Metrocorp. One of the oldest magazines of its kind, it was first published as a quarterly in 1908[1] by the Trades League of Philadelphia. S. Arthur Lipson bought the paper in 1946.[1] Coverage includes Philadelphia
Philadelphia
and the surrounding counties of Montgomery, Chester, Delaware and Bucks County, Pennsylvania, as well as Camden and Burlington counties in New Jersey
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Peabody Award
The George Foster Peabody
George Foster Peabody
Awards (or simply Peabody Awards) program, named for American businessman and philanthropist George Peabody, honor the most powerful, enlightening, and invigorating stories in television, radio, and online media. Programs are recognized in seven categories: news, entertainment, documentaries, children's programming, education, interactive programming, and public service. Peabody Award
Peabody Award
winners include radio and television stations, networks, online media, producing organizations, and individuals from around the world. Established in 1940 by a committee of the National Association of Broadcasters, the prestigious Peabody Award
Peabody Award
was created to honor excellence in radio broadcasting
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FM Broadcasting
FM broadcasting
FM broadcasting
is a method of radio broadcasting using frequency modulation (FM) technology. Invented in 1933 by American engineer Edwin Armstrong, it is used worldwide to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. FM broadcasting
FM broadcasting
is capable of better sound quality than AM broadcasting, the chief competing radio broadcasting technology, so it is used for most music broadcasts. FM radio stations use the VHF
VHF
frequencies
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WRN Broadcast
WRN Broadcast, formerly known as World Radio Network,[1] is an international broadcast services company based in the United Kingdom that works with television channels and radio broadcasters, media owners and brands enabling them to deliver content to target audiences worldwide.[2] WRN Broadcast has developed since 1992 when it was founded as an international radio distribution company known as World Radio Network, which redistributed news and information programs produced by various international public radio networks. Following its acquisition of TSI Broadcast in April 2009,[3] the company expanded its offering to become a comprehensive global broadcast services provider[4] working across traditional and digital platforms to supply television and radio clients with worldwide coverage and managed services. C
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Boycott
A boycott is an act of voluntary and intentional abstention from using, buying, or dealing with a person, organization, or country as an expression of protest, usually for social, political, or environmental reasons. The purpose of a boycott is to inflict some economic loss on the target, or to indicate a moral outrage, to try to compel the target to alter an objectionable behavior. Sometimes, a boycott can be a form of consumer activism, sometimes called moral purchasing. When a similar practice is legislated by a national government, it is known as a sanction.Contents1 Etymology 2 Notable boycotts 3 Application and uses 4 Collective behavior 5 Legality5.1 United States6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesEtymology[edit]Vanity Fair caricature of Charles C
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Organic Farming
Organic farming
Organic farming
is an alternative agricultural system which originated early in the 20th century in reaction to rapidly changing farming practices. Organic farming
Organic farming
continues to be developed by various organic agriculture organizations today. It relies on fertilizers of organic origin such as compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and places emphasis on techniques such as crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest control, mixed cropping and the fostering of insect predators are encouraged. In general, organic standards are designed to allow the use of naturally occurring substances while prohibiting or strictly limiting synthetic substances.[2] For instance, naturally occurring pesticides such as pyrethrin and rotenone are permitted, while synthetic fertilizers and pesticides are generally prohibited
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Classical Music
Classical music
Classical music
is art music produced or rooted in the traditions of Western culture, including both liturgical (religious) and secular music. While a more precise term is also used to refer to the period from 1750 to 1820 (the Classical period), this article is about the broad span of time from before the 6th century AD to the present day, which includes the Classical period and various other periods.[1] The central norms of this tradition became codified between 1550 and 1900, which is known as the common-practice period
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