HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

WCRH
WCRH at 90.5 FM is a religious radio station in Hagerstown, Maryland from Cedar Ridge Ministries.Broadcast translators of WCRHCall sign Frequency (MHz) City of license Facility ID ERP W Height m (ft) Class FCC infoW273BP 102.5 Newville, Pennsylvania 141639 55 −40 m (−130 ft) D FCCW278BL 103.5 Cumberland, Etc., Maryland 9724 10 415 m (1,362 ft) D FCCExternal links[edit]Official Website Query the FCC's FM station database for WCRH Radio-Locator information on WCRH Query Nielsen Audio's FM station database for WCRHv t eRadio stations in the Hagerstown–Chambersburg–Waynesboro marketBy AM frequency800 930 1240 1380 1410 1480 1490 1590By FM frequency88.1 88.3 88.7 (McConnellsburg, Pennsylvania) 88.7 (Shippensburg, Pennsylvania) 89.1 90.5 91.7 92.1 92.9
[...More...]

"WCRH" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

WXDC
WXDC
WXDC
is a oldies formatted broadcast radio station licensed to Berkeley Springs, West Virginia, serving the Berkeley Springs/Hancock area.[1] WXDC
WXDC
is owned and operated by Metro Radio, Inc.[2] History[edit]Logo used until March 2014.The station came on the air as WCST-FM in 1965, but later changed to WDHC with the "Down Home County" branding in 1996. WDHC was originally on 93.5 FM and moved to 92.9 FM in 2005 with a taller tower and twice the original size and double the original power of 93.5. WXDC's distant grade signal can be heard in Winchester, Virginia, Hagerstown, Maryland
Hagerstown, Maryland
and Martinsburg, West Virginia. In 2006, WDHC and sister station WCST finally made a presence on the internet of sorts, with a MySpace Group operated by employees of the station
[...More...]

"WXDC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Call Signs In North America
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
[...More...]

"Call Signs In North America" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

FM Broadcasting
FM broadcasting
FM broadcasting
is a method of radio broadcasting using frequency modulation (FM) technology. Invented in 1933 by American engineer Edwin Armstrong, it is used worldwide to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. FM broadcasting
FM broadcasting
is capable of better sound quality than AM broadcasting, the chief competing radio broadcasting technology, so it is used for most music broadcasts. FM radio stations use the VHF
VHF
frequencies
[...More...]

"FM Broadcasting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

HD Radio
HD Radio
HD Radio
is a trademarked term for iBiquity's in-band on-channel (IBOC) digital radio technology used by AM and FM radio stations to transmit audio and data by using a digital signal embedded "on-frequency" immediately above and below a station's standard analog signal, providing the means to listen to the same program in either HD (digital radio with less noise) or as a standard broadcast (analog radio with standard sound quality). The HD format also provides the means for a single radio station to simultaneously broadcast one or more different programs in addition to the program being transmitted on the radio station's analog channel. It was selected by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission
U.S. Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) in 2002 as a digital audio broadcasting method for the United States,[1][2] and is the only digital system approved by the FCC for digital AM/FM broadcasts in the United States
[...More...]

"HD Radio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

AM Broadcasting
AM broadcasting
AM broadcasting
is a radio broadcasting technology, which employs amplitude modulation (AM) transmissions. It was the first method developed for making audio radio transmissions, and is still used worldwide, primarily for medium wave (also known as "AM band") transmissions, but also on the longwave and shortwave radio bands. The earliest experimental AM transmissions were begun in the early 1900s. However, widespread AM broadcasting
AM broadcasting
was not established until the 1920s, following the development of vacuum tube receivers and transmitters
[...More...]

"AM Broadcasting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Waynesboro, Pennsylvania
Waynesboro is a borough in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, on the southern border of the state. Waynesboro is in the Cumberland Valley between Hagerstown, Maryland, and Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. It is part of Chambersburg, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is part of the Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area. It is 2 miles north of the Mason–Dixon line
Mason–Dixon line
and close to Camp David
Camp David
and the Raven Rock Mountain Complex. The population within the borough limits was 10,568 at the 2010 census. When combined with the surrounding Washington and Quincy Townships, the population of greater Waynesboro is 28,285
[...More...]

"Waynesboro, Pennsylvania" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cumberland, Maryland
Cumberland is a city in and the county seat of Allegany County, Maryland, United States. The gateway to western Maryland, it is the primary city of the Cumberland, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. At the 2010 census, the city had a population of 20,859, and the metropolitan area had a population of 103,299. Cumberland is a regional business and commercial center for Western and the Potomac Highlands of West Virginia. Cumberland is commonly referred to as "Where The South Begins." Historically Cumberland was known as the "Queen City," as it was once the second largest in the state. Because of its strategic location on what became known as the Cumberland Road
Cumberland Road
through the Appalachians, after the American Revolution it served as a historical outfitting and staging point for westward emigrant trail migrations throughout the first half of the 1800s
[...More...]

"Cumberland, Maryland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Newville, Pennsylvania
Newville is a borough in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, United States, west of Carlisle. The population was 1,326 at the 2010 census.[3] It is part of the Harrisburg–Carlisle Metropolitan Statistical Area. Newville is served by the Big Spring School District.Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics 3 History 4 Notable residents 5 References 6 External linksGeography[edit] Newville is located in west-central Cumberland County at 40°10′11″N 77°24′7″W / 40.16972°N 77.40194°W / 40.16972; -77.40194 (40.169614, −77.402029),[4] on the west side of Big Spring Creek, a tributary of Conodoguinet Creek
Conodoguinet Creek
and part of the Susquehanna River
Susquehanna River
watershed
[...More...]

"Newville, Pennsylvania" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

City Of License
In American, Canadian and Philippine broadcasting, a city of license or community of license is the community that a radio station or television station is officially licensed to serve by that country's broadcast regulator. In North American broadcast law, the concept of community of license dates to the early days of AM radio
AM radio
broadcasting. The requirement that a broadcasting station operate a main studio within a prescribed distance of the community which the station is licensed to serve appears in U.S
[...More...]

"City Of License" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Center Frequency
In electrical engineering and telecommunications, the center frequency of a filter or channel is a measure of a central frequency between the upper and lower cutoff frequencies
[...More...]

"Center Frequency" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Broadcast Relay Station
A broadcast relay station, satellite station, relay transmitter, broadcast translator (U.S.), rebroadcaster (Canada), repeater (two-way radio), or complementary station (Mexico) is a broadcast transmitter which repeats, or transponds, the signal of another radio station or television station usually to an area not covered by the signal of the originating station. They may serve, for example, to expand the broadcast range of a television or radio station beyond the primary signal's coverage area, or to improve service in a part of the main coverage area which receives a poor signal due to geographic constraints. These transmitters may be, but are not usually, used to create a single-frequency network. They may also be used by a radio station on either AM or FM to establish a presence on the other band. Sometimes, a rebroadcaster may be owned by a community group rather than the owner of the primary station
[...More...]

"Broadcast Relay Station" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Facility ID
The facility ID number, also called a FIN or facility identifier, is a unique integer number[1] of one to six digits,[2] assigned by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) Media Bureau[1] to each broadcast station in the FCC's Consolidated Database System (CDBS). Because CDBS includes information about foreign stations which are notified to the U.S. under the terms of international frequency coordination agreements, FINs are also assigned to affected foreign stations. However, this has no legal significance, and the numbers are not used by the regulatory authorities in those other countries. Current FCC practice is to assign facility ID numbers sequentially, but this is not an official requirement, so third-party users must not rely on it
[...More...]

"Facility ID" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

List Of North American Broadcast Station Classes
This is a list of broadcast station classes applicable in much of North America under international agreements between the United States, Canada and Mexico. Effective radiated power
Effective radiated power
(ERP) and height above average terrain (HAAT) are listed unless otherwise noted. All radio and television stations within 320 kilometers (about 200 miles) of the US-Canada or US-Mexico border
US-Mexico border
must get approval by both the domestic and foreign agency
[...More...]

"List Of North American Broadcast Station Classes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Height Above Average Terrain
Height above average terrain
Height above average terrain
(HAAT) (or less popularly, EHAAT, Effective Height Above Average Terrain) is a measure of how high an antenna site is above the surrounding landscape. HAAT is used extensively in FM radio
FM radio
and television, as it is more important than effective radiated power (ERP) in determining the range of broadcasts (VHF and UHF in particular, as they are line of sight transmissions). For international coordination, it is officially measured in meters, even by the Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
in the United States, as Canada
Canada
and Mexico
Mexico
have extensive border zones where stations can be received on either side of the international boundaries
[...More...]

"Height Above Average Terrain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Watt
The watt (symbol: W) is a unit of power. In the International System of Units (SI) it is defined as a derived unit of 1 joule per second,[1] and is used to quantify the rate of energy transfer
[...More...]

"Watt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.