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Voyage 200
The TI-92 series
TI-92 series
of graphing calculators are a line of calculators produced by Texas Instruments. They include: the TI-92 (1995), the TI-92 Plus (1998, 1999), and the Voyage 200 (2002). The design of these relatively large calculators includes a QWERTY
QWERTY
keyboard. Because of this keyboard, it was given the status of a "computer" rather than "calculator" by American testing facilities and cannot be used on tests such as the SAT
SAT
or AP Exams
AP Exams
while the similar TI-89
TI-89
can be.Contents1 TI-92 2 TI-92 Plus 3 Voyage 200 4 Features4.1 Technical specifications5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTI-92[edit] The TI-92 was originally released in 1995, and was the first symbolic calculator made by Texas Instruments. It came with a computer algebra system (CAS) based on Derive, and was one of the first calculators to offer 3D graphing
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Periodic Table
The periodic table is a tabular arrangement of the chemical elements, ordered by their atomic number, electron configuration, and recurring chemical properties, whose adopted structure shows periodic trends. Generally, within one row (period) the elements are metals on the left, and non-metals on the right, with the elements having similar chemical behaviours being placed in the same column. Table rows are commonly called periods and columns are called groups. Six groups have accepted names as well as assigned numbers: for example, group 17 elements are halogens; and group 18 are noble gases. Also displayed are four simple rectangular areas or blocks associated with the filling of different atomic orbitals. Importantly, the organization of the periodic table can be utilized to derive relationships between various element properties, but also predicted chemical properties and behaviours of undiscovered or newly synthesized elements
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Computer Algebra System
A computer algebra system (CAS) is any mathematical software with the ability to manipulate mathematical expressions in a way similar to the traditional manual computations of mathematicians and scientists. The development of the computer algebra systems in the second half of the 20th century is part of the discipline of "computer algebra" or "symbolic computation", which has spurred work in algorithms over mathematical objects such as polynomials. Computer algebra systems may be divided into two classes: specialized and general-purpose. The specialized ones are devoted to a specific part of mathematics, such as number theory, group theory, or teaching of elementary mathematics. General-purpose computer algebra systems aim to be useful to a user working in any scientific field that requires manipulation of mathematical expressions
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Random Access Memory
Random-access memory
Random-access memory
(RAM /ræm/) is a form of computer data storage that stores data and machine code currently being used. A random-access memory device allows data items to be read or written in almost the same amount of time irrespective of the physical location of data inside the memory. In contrast, with other direct-access data storage media such as hard disks, CD-RWs, DVD-RWs and the older magnetic tapes and drum memory, the time required to read and write data items varies significantly depending on their physical locations on the recording medium, due to mechanical limitations such as media rotation speeds and arm movement. RAM contains multiplexing and demultiplexing circuitry, to connect the data lines to the addressed storage for reading or writing the entry. Usually more than one bit of storage is accessed by the same address, and RAM devices often have multiple data lines and are said to be "8-bit" or "16-bit", etc
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Video Game
A video game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but as of the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Some theorists categorize video games as an art form, but this designation is controversial. The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices
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Statistics
Statistics
Statistics
is a branch of mathematics dealing with the collection, analysis, interpretation, presentation, and organization of data.[1][2] In applying statistics to, for example, a scientific, industrial, or social problem, it is conventional to begin with a statistical population or a statistical model process to be studied. Populations can be diverse topics such as "all people living in a country" or "every atom composing a crystal". Statistics
Statistics
deals with all aspects of data including the planning of data collection in terms of the design of surveys and experiments.[1] See glossary of probability and statistics. When census data cannot be collected, statisticians collect data by developing specific experiment designs and survey samples. Representative sampling assures that inferences and conclusions can reasonably extend from the sample to the population as a whole
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Curve Fitting
Curve
Curve
fitting[1][2] is the process of constructing a curve, or mathematical function, that has the best fit to a series of data points,[3] possibly subject to constraints.[4][5] Curve
Curve
fitting can involve either interpolation,[6][7] where an exact fit to the data is required, or smoothing,[8][9] in which a "smooth" function is constructed that approximately fits the data. A related topic is regression analysis,[10][11] which focuses more on questions of statistical inference such as how much uncertainty is present in a curve that is fit to data observed with random errors
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Megabyte
The megabyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. Its recommended unit symbol is MB. The unit prefix mega is a multiplier of 1000000 (106) in the International System of Units (SI).[1] Therefore, one megabyte is one million bytes of information. This definition has been incorporated into the International System of Quantities. However, in the computer and information technology fields, several other definitions are used that arose for historical reasons of convenience. A common usage has been to designate one megabyte as 1048576bytes (220 B), a measurement that conveniently expresses the binary multiples inherent in digital computer memory architectures. However, most standards bodies have deprecated this usage in favor of a set of binary prefixes,[2] in which this quantity is designated by the unit mebibyte (MiB)
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AAA Battery
An AAA or triple-A battery is a standard size of dry cell battery commonly used in low-drain portable electronic devices. A zinc–carbon battery in this size is designated by IEC as "R03", by ANSI
ANSI
C18.1 as "24", by old JIS standard as "UM 4", and by other manufacturer and national standard designations that vary depending on the cell chemistry. A triple-A battery is a single cell and measures 10.5 mm (0.41 in) in diameter and 44.5 mm (1.75 in) in length, including the positive terminal button, which is a minimum 0.8 mm (0.031 in). The positive terminal has a maximum diameter of 3.8 mm (0.15 in); the flat negative terminal has a minimum diameter of 4.3 mm (0.17 in).[1] Alkaline AAA batteries weigh around 11.5 grams (0.41 oz), while primary lithium AAA batteries weigh about 7.6 g (0.27 oz)
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Flash Memory
Flash memory
Flash memory
is an electronic (solid-state) non-volatile computer storage medium that can be electrically erased and reprogrammed. Toshiba
Toshiba
developed flash memory from E EPROM
EPROM
(electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) in the early 1980s and introduced it to the market in 1984. The two main types of flash memory are named after the NAND and NOR logic gates. The individual flash memory cells exhibit internal characteristics similar to those of the corresponding gates. While EPROMs had to be completely erased before being rewritten, NAND-type flash memory may be written and read in blocks (or pages) which are generally much smaller than the entire device
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Read-only Memory
Read-only memory
Read-only memory
(ROM) is a type of non-volatile memory used in computers and other electronic devices. Data stored in ROM can only be modified slowly, with difficulty, or not at all, so it is mainly used to store firmware (software that is closely tied to specific hardware, and unlikely to need frequent updates) or application software in plug-in cartridges. Strictly, read-only memory refers to memory that is hard-wired, such as diode matrix and the later mask ROM (MROM), which cannot be changed after manufacture. Although discrete circuits can be altered in principle, integrated circuits (ICs) cannot, and are useless if the data is bad or requires an update. That such memory can never be changed is a disadvantage in many applications, as bugs and security issues cannot be fixed, and new features cannot be added. More recently, ROM has come to include memory that is read-only in normal operation, but can still be reprogrammed in some way
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Kilobyte
The kilobyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. The International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) defines the prefix kilo as 1000 (103); per this definition, one kilobyte is 1000 bytes.[1] The internationally recommended unit symbol for the kilobyte is kB.[1] In some areas of information technology, particularly in reference to digital memory capacity, kilobyte instead denotes 1024 (210) bytes. This arises from the powers-of-two sizing common to memory circuit design. In this context, the symbols K and KB are often used.Contents1 Definitions and usage1.1 1000 bytes 1.2 1024 bytes1.2.1 Kibibyte2 Examples 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesDefinitions and usage[edit] 1000 bytes[edit] In the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) the prefix kilo means 1000 (103); therefore, one kilobyte is 1000 bytes
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Flash ROM
Flash memory
Flash memory
is an electronic (solid-state) non-volatile computer storage medium that can be electrically erased and reprogrammed. Toshiba
Toshiba
developed flash memory from E EPROM
EPROM
(electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) in the early 1980s and introduced it to the market in 1984. The two main types of flash memory are named after the NAND and NOR logic gates. The individual flash memory cells exhibit internal characteristics similar to those of the corresponding gates. While EPROMs had to be completely erased before being rewritten, NAND-type flash memory may be written and read in blocks (or pages) which are generally much smaller than the entire device
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Derive Computer Algebra System
Derive was a computer algebra system, developed as a successor to muMATH by the Soft Warehouse in Honolulu, Hawaii, now owned by Texas Instruments. Derive was implemented in muLISP (de), also by Soft Warehouse. The first release was in 1988. It was discontinued on June 29, 2007 in favor of the TI-Nspire CAS. The last and final version is Derive 6.1 for MS Windows. Since Derive required comparably little memory, it was suitable for use on older and smaller machines. It was available for Windows and DOS
DOS
platforms and was used also in TI pocket calculators. Books[edit]Derive 1.0 - A Mathematical Assistant Program (2nd printing, 3rd ed.). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Soft Warehouse, Inc
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ARM Architecture
All mandatory: Thumb-2, NEON, VFPv4-D16, VFPv4 Obsolete: JazelleRegistersGeneral purpose 31×  64-bit integer registers[1]Floating point 32×  128-bit registers[1] for scalar 32- and 64-bit FP or SIMD
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ACT (examination)
The ACT (/eɪ siː tiː/; originally an abbreviation of American College Testing)[10] is a standardized test used for college admissions in the United States. It was first introduced in November 1959 by University of Iowa
University of Iowa
professor Everett Franklin Lindquist as a competitor to the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).[11] It is currently administered by ACT, a nonprofit organization of the same name.[10] The ACT originally consisted of four tests: English, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Natural Sciences
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