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Votive Candle
A votive candle or prayer candle is a small candle, typically white or beeswax yellow, intended to be burnt as a votive offering in an act of Christian prayer, especially within the Anglican
Anglican
and Roman Catholic Christian denominations, among others.[1][2][3] In Christianity, votive candles are commonplace in many churches, as well as home altars, and symbolize the "prayers the worshipper is offering for him or herself, or for other people."[4][2][3] The size of a votive candle is often two inches tall by one and a half inches diameter, although other votive candles can be significantly taller and wider
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Grace Episcopal Cathedral (Topeka, Kansas)
Towers 92 feet Limestone High Altar 17 feetSpire height 33 feetMaterials LimestoneBells Deagan Tower ChimesAdministrationDiocese KansasClergyBishop(s) Rt. Rev. Dean E. WolfeDean Very Rev. R. Steve LipscombGrace Episcopal Cathedral is located in Topeka, Kansas, United States. It is the seat of the Episcopal Diocese of Kansas.Contents1 History 2 Architecture 3 Photos 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Grace Cathedral started as a mission founded by the Rev. Charles M. Callaway. The first service was held on January 20, 1857 at Constitution Hall, a building used by John Farnsworth for his general merchandise business. Two years later services were moved to the Ritchie Block. The convention for the Diocese of Kansas met there on April 11 and 12, 1860 and on September 9 Grace Mission was legally incorporated as Grace Church
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Icon
An icon (from Greek εἰκών eikōn "image") is a religious work of art, most commonly a painting, from the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, and certain Eastern Catholic
Eastern Catholic
churches. The most common subjects include Christ, Mary, saints and/or angels. Though especially associated with "portrait" style images concentrating on one or two main figures, the term also covers most religious images in a variety of artistic media produced by Eastern Christianity, including narrative scenes. Icons may also be cast in metal, carved in stone, embroidered on cloth, painted on wood, done in mosaic or fresco work, printed on paper or metal, etc
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Anglican
Anglicanism
Anglicanism
is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England
Church of England
following the Protestant Reformation.[1] Adherents of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion,[2] which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic
Catholic
Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church.[3] They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals")
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Anglo-Catholic
The terms Anglo-Catholicism, Anglican Catholicism, and Catholic Anglicanism
Anglicanism
refer to people, beliefs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise the Catholic
Catholic

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Pray For The Dead
Wherever there is a belief in the continued existence of human personality through and after death, religion naturally concerns itself with the relations between the living and the dead
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Intercession Of Saints
Intercession of the saints is a doctrine held by the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox
Oriental Orthodox
and Roman Catholic Churches. The practice of praying to saints can be found in Christian writings from the 3rd century onwards.[2][3] The 4th-century Apostles' Creed
Apostles' Creed
states belief in the communion of saints, which certain Christian churches interpret as supporting the intercession of saints
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Jesus
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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Blessed Virgin Mary
Mary (Greek: Μαρία, translit. María; Aramaic: ܡܪܝܡ‎, translit. Mariam; Hebrew: מִרְיָם‎, translit. Miriam; Coptic: Ⲙⲁⲣⲓⲁ; Arabic: مريم‎, translit. Maryam), also known by various titles, styles and honorifics, was a 1st-century BC Galilean Jewish[2] woman of Nazareth, and the mother of Jesus, according to the New Testament[3][4][5][6] and the Quran.[7][8] The gospels of Matthew and Luke in the New Testament
New Testament
and the Quran describe Mary as a virgin (Greek: παρθένος, translit. parthénos)[9] and many[which?] Christians believe that she conceived her son while a virgin by the Holy Spirit
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Bye-altar
A side-altar or bye-altar is an altar that is subordinate to the central or high altar in a church. The term is generally applied to altars that are situated in the bay or bays of the nave, transepts, etc.[1] Side-altars may be recessed in a side-chapel, or against a main aisle wall. References[edit]^ "Bye-Altar". Catholic Encyclopedia. See also[edit]Lady chapel This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. This Catholic Church–related article is a stub
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Eastern Orthodox Church
The Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church,[1] also known as the Orthodox Church,[2] or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church,[3] is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.[4][5] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern Europe, Greece
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Jesus Christ
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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Intention
Intention is a mental state that represents a commitment to carrying out an action or actions in the future
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Theotokos
Theotokos
Theotokos
(Greek Θεοτόκος Greek pronunciation: [θeoˈtokos][1]) is a title of Mary, mother of God, used especially in Eastern Christianity
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Good Friday
Good Friday
Good Friday
is a Christian holiday[1][2] commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus
Jesus
and His death at Calvary. It is observed during Holy Week
Holy Week
as part of the Paschal Triduum
Paschal Triduum
on the Friday preceding Easter
Easter
Sunday, and may coincide with the Jewish observance of Passover. It is also known as Holy Friday, Great Friday, and Black Friday.[3][4][5] Members of many Christian denominations, including the Anglican, Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran, Methodist, Oriental Orthodox
Oriental Orthodox
and Reformed
Reformed
traditions, observe Good Friday
Good Friday
with fasting and church services.[6][7][8] The date of Good Friday
Good Friday
varies from one year to the next on both the Gregorian and Julian calendars
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United Methodist Church
12,719,550 (6,951,278 in the U.S.)[8]Ministers 83,800Aid organization United Methodist
Methodist
Committee on ReliefSecondary schools 10Tertiary institutions 109Official website umc.orgThe United Methodist
Methodist
Church is a mainline Protestant
Protestant
denomination and a major part of Methodism. In the 19th century, its main predecessor—the Methodist
Methodist
Episcopal Church—was a leader in Evangelicalism. The present denomination was founded in 1968 in Dallas, Texas
Dallas, Texas
by union of the Methodist
Methodist
Church and the Evangelical United Brethren Church
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