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Vos Iz Neias?
Vos Iz Neias? (Yiddish: "What's News?") is an online news site that caters to the Orthodox Jewish
Orthodox Jewish
and Hasidic
Hasidic
communities in the United States. Its coverage is primarily focused on the New York metropolitan area and Israel
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Types Of Business Entity
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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PayPal
PayPal
PayPal
Holdings, Inc. is an American company operating a worldwide online payments system that supports online money transfers and serves as an electronic alternative to traditional paper methods like checks and money orders
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American Israel Public Affairs Committee
The American Israel
Israel
Public Affairs Committee ( AIPAC
AIPAC
/ˈeɪpæk/ AY-pak) is a lobbying group that advocates pro- Israel
Israel
policies to the Congress and Executive Branch of the United States
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Ameinu
Ameinu
Ameinu
(Hebrew: "our people") is an American Jewish Zionist organization. Established in 2004 as the successor to the Labor Zionist Alliance,[1] it is the continuation of Labor Zionist
Labor Zionist
activity in the United States
United States
that began with the founding of Poale Zion,[2] which came together in the period 1903-1905. Ameinu
Ameinu
is headquartered in New York City
New York City
and is governed by an elected national board which is led by its president, Kenneth Bob. Local activity is carried out through its chapters in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, St
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HIAS
HIAS (founded as the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) is an American nonprofit organization that provides humanitarian aid and assistance to refugees. The organization works with people whose lives and freedom are believed to be at risk due to war, persecution, or violence. HIAS has offices in the United States
United States
and across Latin America, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East
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Jewish Labor Committee
The Jewish Labor Committee (JLC) is an American secular Jewish organization dedicated to promoting labor union interests in Jewish communities, and Jewish interests within unions.[1] The organization is headquartered in New York City, with local/regional offices in Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago
Chicago
and Los Angeles, and volunteer-led affiliated groups in a number of other U.S. communities. It was founded in 1934 in response to the rise of Nazism
Nazism
in Europe. Today, it works to maintain and strengthen the historically strong relationship between the American Jewish community and the trade union movement, and to promote what they see as the shared social justice agenda of both communities
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Private Company
A privately held company, private company, or close corporation is a business company owned either by non-governmental organizations or by a relatively small number of shareholders or company members which does not offer or trade its company stock (shares) to the general public on the stock market exchanges, but rather the company's stock is offered, owned and traded or exchanged privately. More ambiguous terms for a privately held company are unquoted company and unlisted company. Though less visible than their publicly traded counterparts, private companies have major importance in the world's economy. In 2008, the 441 largest private companies in the United States accounted for US$1,800,000,000,000 in revenues and employed 6.2 million people, according to Forbes. In 2005, using a substantially smaller pool size (22.7%) for comparison, the 339 companies on Forbes' survey of closely held U.S
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Yerucham Olshin
Yerucham Olshin is an Orthodox Jewish rabbi and one of the rosh yeshivas (deans) of Beth Medrash Govoha,[2][3] an Orthodox yeshiva located in Lakewood, New Jersey.[4] The other rosh yeshivas are Rabbis Malkiel Kotler, Yisroel Neuman,[5] and Dovid Schustal; they divide up the times they present shiurim (Torah lectures) to students in the numerous battei medrash (study halls) on the Lakewood campus.[3] Rabbi Olshins' works dealing with the Jewish holidays have been published under the title Yareach L'Moadim. Rabbi Olshin was a student of Rabbi Eliyahu Moshe Shisgal, Rabbi Abba Berman, and Rabbi Shneur Kotler. Rabbi Olshin is married to Shalva, the daughter of Rav Dov Schwartzman,[6] who is a granddaughter of the founder of the yeshiva, Rabbi Aharon Kotler. References[edit]^ "Rav Dov Schwartzman, zt"l". matzav.com. 7 November 2011. Retrieved 7 November 2011.  ^ Davidson, Aryeh (24 March 2007). "Breaking the Barriers". Ohr Somayach International
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Aaron Schechter
Aaron Moshe Schechter (also Aharon Moshe Schechter) is the rosh yeshiva ("dean") of the Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin
Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin
and its post-graduate Talmudical division Kollel Gur Aryeh as well as of all the branches of the yeshiva in Brooklyn, New York City
New York City
that includes an elementary school and a high school for young Jewish boys, teenagers, and young men almost exclusively drawn from the surrounding community of Haredi Jews living in Midwood, Brooklyn. The total number of students at the "Chaim Berlin" institutions is close to three thousand students. Rabbi
Rabbi
Schechter was born in Brooklyn
Brooklyn
in the 1920s and became a disciple of Rabbi
Rabbi
Yitzchok Hutner
Yitzchok Hutner
after being enrolled in the Yeshiva Rabbi
Rabbi
Chaim Berlin as a young child
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Malkiel Kotler
Aryeh Malkiel Kotler
Malkiel Kotler
(born April 1951) is a Haredi rabbi and rosh yeshiva of Beth Medrash Govoha
Beth Medrash Govoha
(BMG) in Lakewood, New Jersey, one of the largest yeshivas in the world.[1] Serving with him as roshei yeshiva (deans) are Rabbis Dovid Schustal, Yeruchem Olshin, and Yisroel Neuman.[2] He is the son of the previous rosh yeshiva, Rabbi Shneur Kotler, and grandson of the founder of the yeshiva, Rabbi Aaron Kotler. He is a member of the Moetzes Gedolei HaTorah
Moetzes Gedolei HaTorah
(Council of Torah Sages) of Agudath Israel of America. Biography[edit] Kotler was born to Rabbi Shneur Kotler
Shneur Kotler
and his wife, Rischel, the daughter of Rabbi Aryeh Malkiel Friedman. He was named after his maternal grandfather. On his father's side, he is the great-grandson of Rabbi Isser Zalman Meltzer
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Yaakov Perlow
Yaakov Perlow (born 1931) is an American-born Hasidic rabbi and rosh yeshiva, and Rebbe
Rebbe
of the Novominsker Hasidic dynasty. Since 1998 he has been president of Agudath Israel of America, a Haredi advocacy organization. He is also a member of the Moetzes Gedolei HaTorah (Council of Torah Sages) of Agudath Israel of America. He is one of the most respected leaders of the American Orthodox community.[1]Contents1 Family background 2 Education and career 3 Agudath Israel of America 4 Quotes 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksFamily background[edit] Yaakov Perlow was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Rabbi Nochum Mordechai Perlow (1887-1976), the Novominsker Rebbe, and his wife, Beila Rochma Morgenstern
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Haredi Judaism
Haredi
Haredi
Judaism
Judaism
(Hebrew: חֲרֵדִי‬ Ḥaredi, IPA: [χaʁeˈdi]; also spelled Charedi, plural Haredim or Charedim) is a broad spectrum of groups within Orthodox Judaism, all characterized by a rejection of modern secular culture
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Rabbinical
Rabbinic Judaism
Judaism
or Rabbinism (Hebrew: יהדות רבנית‬ Yahadut Rabanit) has been the mainstream form of Judaism
Judaism
since the 6th century CE, after the codification of the Babylonian Talmud. Growing out of Pharisaic Judaism, Rabbinic Judaism
Judaism
is based on the belief that at Mount Sinai, Moses
Moses
received from God
God
the Written Torah
Torah
(Pentateuch) in addition to an oral explanation, known as the "Oral Torah," that Moses
Moses
transmitted to the people. Rabbinic Judaism
Judaism
contrasts with the Sadducees, Karaite Judaism
Judaism
and Samaritanism, which do not recognize the oral law as a divine authority nor the Rabbinic procedures used to interpret Jewish scripture
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Tevet
Tevet
Tevet
(Hebrew: טֵבֵת, Standard Tevet; Sephardim/Yemenite/ Mizrachim
Mizrachim
"Tebeth"; Ashkenazi Teves; Tiberian Ṭēḇēṯ; from Akkadian ṭebētu) is the fourth month of the civil year and the tenth month of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar. It follows Kislev
Kislev
and precedes Shevat. It is a winter month of 29 days. Tevet
Tevet
usually occurs in December–January on the Gregorian calendar. Contents1 Gregorian new year 2 Holidays in Tevet2.1 Community holidays3 Tevet
Tevet
in Jewish history and tradition 4 ReferencesGregorian new year[edit] The Gregorian New Year's Day nearly always occurs in this month
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