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Vladimir Prelog
Vladimir Prelog
Vladimir Prelog
ForMemRS[1] (23 July 1906 – 7 January 1998) was a Croatian-Swiss organic chemist who received the 1975 Nobel Prize in chemistry for his research into the stereochemistry of organic molecules and reactions. Prelog was born and grew up in Sarajevo.[2] He lived and worked in Prague, Zagreb
Zagreb
and Zürich
Zürich
during his lifetime.[3][4]Contents1 Early life1.1 Education2 Career and research2.1 Zürich 2.2 Later work in Switzerland3 Awards and honours 4 Personal life 5 ReferencesEarly life Prelog was born in Sarajevo, Condominium of Bosnia and Herzegovina, at that time within the Austro-Hungarian Empire, to Croat parents who were working there
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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Condominium Of Bosnia And Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
fell under Austro-Hungarian rule in 1878 when the Congress of Berlin
Congress of Berlin
approved the occupation of the Bosnia Vilayet, which officially remained part of the Ottoman Empire
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Austro-Hungarian Empire
Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire
Empire
or the Dual Monarchy
Dual Monarchy
in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
(the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary ( Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it collapsed as a result of defeat in World War I. The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867
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Gymnasium (school)
A gymnasium is a type of school with a strong emphasis on academic learning, and providing advanced secondary education in some parts of Europe comparable to British grammar schools, sixth form colleges and US preparatory high schools. In its current meaning, it usually refers to secondary schools focused on preparing students to enter a university for advanced academic study. Before the 20th century, the system of gymnasiums was a wide spread feature of educational system throughout many countries of central, north, eastern, and south Europe. Historically, the German Gymnasium also included in its overall accelerated curriculum post secondary education at college level and the degree awarded substituted for the bachelor's degree (Baccalaureat)[1] previously awarded by a college or university so that universities in Germany became exclusively graduate schools
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Assassination Of Franz Ferdinand
The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand
Franz Ferdinand
of Austria, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian
Austro-Hungarian
throne, and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, occurred on 28 June 1914 in Sarajevo
Sarajevo
when they were mortally wounded by Gavrilo Princip. Princip was one of a group of six assassins (five Serbs
Serbs
and one Bosniak) coordinated by Danilo Ilić, a Bosnian Serb
Bosnian Serb
and a member of the Black Hand secret society. The political objective of the assassination was to break off Austria-Hungary's South Slav provinces so they could be combined into a Yugoslavia. The assassins' motives were consistent with the movement that later became known as Young Bosnia
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Croatian Academy Of Sciences And Arts
The Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts
Arts
(Latin: Academia
Academia
Scientiarum et Artium Croatica, Croatian: Hrvatska akademija znanosti i umjetnosti, abbrev. HAZU) is the national academy of Croatia. Founded in 1866, it is the oldest national academy in Southeast Europe. HAZU was founded under patronage of the Croatian bishop Josip Juraj Strossmayer under the name Yugoslav Academy of Sciences and Arts (Jugoslavenska akademija znanosti i umjetnosti, abbrev. JAZU) since its founder wanted to make it the central scientific and artistic institution of all South Slavs
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Franjo Rački
Franjo Rački
Franjo Rački
(25 November 1828 – 13 February 1894) was a Croatian historian, politician and writer. He compiled important collections of old Croatian diplomatic and historical documents, wrote some pioneering historical works, and was a key founder of the Yugoslav Academy of Sciences and Arts.Contents1 Historian 2 Academy 3 Politician 4 External linksHistorian[edit] Rački was born in Fužine, near Rijeka. He completed his secondary education in Senj
Senj
and Varaždin. He graduated theology in Senj, where he was ordained Catholic priest by the bishop Ožegović in 1852. Rački received his PhD in theology in Vienna
Vienna
in 1855. His career as a historian began as soon as he started working as a teacher in Senj. An industrious man, full of patriotic fervor, Rački organized the research of Glagolitic
Glagolitic
documents on the islands of Kvarner
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Austro-Hungary
Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire
Empire
or the Dual Monarchy
Dual Monarchy
in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
(the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary ( Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it collapsed as a result of defeat in World War I. The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867
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Chemiker Zeitung
Chemiker Zeitung was a German scientific journal with publications on general and industrial chemistry. It was established in 1877,[1][2] and it issued in Köthen. From 1932 onwards, it was named Forschrittsbericht der Chemiker-Zeitung über die wichtigsten Gebiete der Chemie und chemischen Industrie and in 1950 the name changed to Deutsche Chemiker-Zeitschrift. Publication was suspended between 1945-1949. The journal was continued from 1959 to 1968 as the Chemiker-Zeitung, Chemische Apparatur. In 1992, Chemiker Zeitung was merged with Journal für praktische Chemie (established in 1834).[3] Since 2001, Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis (publisher: Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, Germany) integrated both Chemiker Zeitung and Journal für praktische Chemie. See also[edit]Science and technology in GermanyReferences[edit]^ Remane, H.; Weise, F. (1994). "Die "Geburtsurkunde" der "Chemiker-Zeitung"". Journal für Praktische Chemie/Chemiker-Zeitung. 336 (2): 182
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Doctor Of Science
Doctor of Science (Latin: Scientiae Doctor), usually abbreviated Sc.D., D.Sc., S.D., D.S., or Dr.Sc., is an academic research degree awarded in a number of countries throughout the world. In some countries, "Doctor of Science" is the title used for the standard doctorate in the sciences; elsewhere the Sc.D. is a "higher doctorate" awarded in recognition of a substantial and sustained contribution to scientific knowledge beyond that required for a PhD
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Alkaloids
Alkaloids are a group of naturally occurring chemical compounds that mostly contain basic nitrogen atoms. This group also includes some related compounds with neutral[2] and even weakly acidic properties.[3] Some synthetic compounds of similar structure are also termed alkaloids.[4] In addition to carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen, alkaloids may also contain oxygen, sulfur and, more rarely, other elements such as chlorine, bromine, and phosphorus.[5] Alkaloids are produced by a large variety of organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. They can be purified from crude extracts of these organisms by acid-base extraction. Alkaloids have a wide range of pharmacological activities including antimalarial (e.g. quinine), antiasthma (e.g. ephedrine), anticancer (e.g. homoharringtonine),[6] cholinomimetic (e.g. galantamine),[7] vasodilatory (e.g. vincamine), antiarrhythmic (e.g. quinidine), analgesic (e.g. morphine),[8] antibacterial (e.g
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Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire
Empire
or the Dual Monarchy
Dual Monarchy
in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
(the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary ( Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it collapsed as a result of defeat in World War I. The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867
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Theobroma Cacao
Theobroma
Theobroma
cacao, also called the cacao tree and the cocoa tree, is a small (4–8 m (13–26 ft) tall) evergreen tree in the family Malvaceae,[2] native to the deep tropical regions of Central and South America
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Quinine
Quinine
Quinine
is a medication used to treat malaria and babesiosis.[2] This includes the treatment of malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum
Plasmodium falciparum
that is resistant to chloroquine when artesunate is not available.[2][3] While used for restless
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