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Vive Le Québec Libre
"Vive le Québec libre!" (French: [vivᵊ ləkebɛk ˈlibʁᵊ], "Long live free Quebec!") was a controversial phrase in a speech delivered by President Charles de Gaulle
Charles de Gaulle
of France on July 24, 1967, during an official visit to Canada under the pretext of attending Expo 67 in Montreal, Quebec. While giving an address to a large crowd from a balcony at Montreal City Hall, he uttered "Vive Montréal; Vive le Québec!" ("Long live Montreal, Long live Quebec!") and then added, followed by loud applause, "Vive le Québec libre!" ("Long live free Quebec!") with particular emphasis on the word "libre". The phrase, a slogan used by Quebecers who favoured Quebec sovereignty, and de Gaulle's use of it was seen by them as giving his support to the movement. The speech sparked a diplomatic incident with Canada's government, and was condemned by Prime Minister Lester B
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Pierre Berton
Pierre Francis de Marigny Berton CC OOnt (July 12, 1920 – November 30, 2004) was a noted Canadian author of non-fiction, especially Canadiana
Canadiana
and Canadian history, and was a television personality and journalist. He won many honors and awards for his books. An accomplished storyteller, Berton was one of Canada's most prolific and popular authors. He wrote on popular culture, Canadian history, critiques of mainstream religion, anthologies, children's books and historical works for youth. He was also a founder of the Writers' Trust of Canada, a non-profit literary organization that seeks to encourage Canada's writing community. Berton's 50 books became popular because his light and fast-paced style was not weighted down by footnotes or deep probes into primary sources
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Breton People
The Bretons
Bretons
(Breton: Bretoned, Breton pronunciation: [breˈtɔ̃nɛt]) are an ethnic group located in the region of Brittany
Brittany
in France. They trace much of their heritage to groups of Brittonic speakers who immigrated from southwestern Great Britain, particularly Cornwall
Cornwall
and Devon, to expand their territory onto the continent. They also descend in some parts from Vikings. They migrated in waves from the 3rd to 9th century (most heavily from 450–600) into Armorica, which was subsequently named Brittany
Brittany
after them.[7] The main traditional language of Brittany
Brittany
is Breton (Brezhoneg), spoken in Lower Brittany
Brittany
(i.e
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Jean Drapeau
Jean Drapeau, CC GOQ (18 February 1916 – 12 August 1999) was a Canadian lawyer and politician who served as mayor of Montreal
Montreal
from 1954 to 1957 and 1960 to 1986. Major accomplishments of the Drapeau Administration include the development of the Montreal
Montreal
Metro mass transit system, the successful revival of international expositions such as with Expo 67
Expo 67
as well as the construction of a major performing arts centre, the Place des Arts. Drapeau also successfully lobbied for the 1976 Summer Olympics
1976 Summer Olympics
and personally chose its lead architect, Roger Taillibert, to design the city's iconic stadium, athlete's village and inclined tower
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Dale C. Thomson
Dale Cairns Thomson DFC (17 June 1923 – 27 April 1999) was a professor and departmental director at the Université de Montréal, professor and Vice-Principal of McGill University and a professor of international relations and Director of the Center of Canadian Studies at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. and the author of several important historical works. Born on a Westlock, Alberta farm, Dale Thomson served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. At the end of the war, he attended the University of Alberta, graduating with a B.A. degree in 1948. Fluent in the French language, he then obtained a diploma in international relations from the University of Paris in 1950 and his doctorate from the university's Faculty of Letters in 1951
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Saint Lawrence River
The Saint Lawrence River
River
(French: Fleuve Saint-Laurent; Tuscarora: Kahnawáʼkye;[3] Mohawk: Kaniatarowanenneh, meaning "big waterway") is a large river in the middle latitudes of North America. The Saint Lawrence River
River
flows in a roughly north-easterly direction, connecting the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
with the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and forming the primary drainage outflow of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
Basin. It traverses the Canadian provinces of Quebec
Quebec
and Ontario, and is part of the international boundary between Ontario, Canada, and the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York
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Liberation Of Paris
Allied victoryCapture and liberation of Paris Paris
Paris
made capital of the re-established Provisional Government of the French RepublicBelligerents France United States Spanish republicans  GermanyCommanders and leaders Charles de Gaulle Philippe Leclerc Dietrich von Choltitz Units involved 2nd Armored Division Régiment de marche du Tchad French Forces of the Interior 325th Security DivisionCasualties and lossesFrench Resistance: 1,600 dead[1] Free French Forces: 130 dead 319 wounded[2] United States: Unknown
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Diplomatic Protocol
In international politics, protocol is the etiquette of diplomacy and affairs of state. It may also refer to an international agreement that supplements or amends a treaty. A protocol is a rule which describes how an activity should be performed, especially in the field of diplomacy. In diplomatic services and governmental fields of endeavor protocols are often unwritten guidelines. Protocols specify the proper and generally accepted behavior in matters of state and diplomacy, such as showing appropriate respect to a head of state, ranking diplomats in chronological order of their accreditation at court, and so on. One definition is:Protocol is commonly described as a set of international courtesy rules. These well-established and time-honored rules have made it easier for nations and people to live and work together. Part of protocol has always been the acknowledgment of the hierarchical standing of all present. Protocol rules are based on the principles of civility.—Dr. P.M
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Territorial Integrity
Territorial integrity is the principle under international law that nation-states should not attempt to promote secessionist movements or to promote border changes in other nation-states.[citation needed] Conversely it states that imposition by force of a border change is an act of aggression
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Pierre Trudeau
Joseph Philippe Pierre Yves Elliott Trudeau, PC CC CH QC FRSC (/truːˈdoʊ/; French: [tʁydo]; October 18, 1919 – September 28, 2000), often referred to by the initials PET,[1][2][3] was a Canadian statesman who served as the 15th Prime Minister of Canada
Canada
(1968–1979 and 1980–1984). He is the third longest-serving Prime Minister in Canadian history (behind William Lyon Mackenzie King and John A. Macdonald), having served for 15 years, 164 days. Trudeau rose to prominence as a lawyer, intellectual, and activist in Quebec
Quebec
politics. In the 1960s he entered federal politics by joining the Liberal Party of Canada. He was appointed as Lester B. Pearson's Parliamentary Secretary
Parliamentary Secretary
and later became his Minister of Justice. Trudeau became a media sensation, inspiring "Trudeaumania", and took charge of the Liberals in 1968
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Brittany
Brittany
Brittany
(/ˈbrɪtəni/; French: Bretagne [bʁətaɲ] ( listen); Breton: Breizh, pronounced [bʁɛjs] or [bʁɛχ];[1] Gallo: Bertaèyn, pronounced [bəʁtaɛɲ]) is a cultural region in the northwest of France, covering the western part of what was known as Armorica
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Le Monde
Le Monde
Le Monde
(French pronunciation: ​[lə mɔ̃d]; English: The World) is a French daily afternoon newspaper founded by Hubert Beuve-Méry at the request of Charles de Gaulle
Charles de Gaulle
(as Chairman of the Provisional Government of the French Republic) on 19 December 1944, shortly after the Liberation of Paris, and published continuously since its first edition. It is one of the most important and widely respected newspapers in the world.[3] It is one of two French newspapers of record along with Le Figaro, and the main publication of La Vie- Le Monde
Le Monde
Group. It reported an average circulation of 323,039 copies per issue in 2009, about 40,000 of which were sold abroad. It has had its own website since 19 December 1995, and is often the only French newspaper easily obtainable in non-French-speaking countries
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French And Indian War
British victoryTreaty of ParisTerritorial changes France cedes New France
New France
east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
to Great Britain, retaining Saint Pierre and Mi
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French Canadian
French Canadians
Canadians
(also referred to as Franco- Canadians
Canadians
or Canadiens; French: Canadien(ne)s français(es)) are an ethnic group who trace their ancestry to French colonists who settled in Canada
Canada
from the 17th century onward. Today, French Canadians
Canadians
constitute the main French-speaking population in Canada, accounting for about 22% of the total population.[2] During the mid-18th century, Canadian colonists born in French Canada expanded across North America
North America
and colonized various regions, cities, and towns;[3] the French Canadian settlers originated primarily from districts in the west of France, such as Normandy, Perche, Beauce, Maine, Anjou, Touraine, Poitou, Aunis, Angoumois, Saintonge
Saintonge
and Gascony.[4] Today, French Canadians
Canadians
live across North America
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René Lévesque
René Lévesque[1] GOQ ( Quebec
Quebec
French pronunciation: [ʁœne leˈvaɪ̯k] ( listen); August 24, 1922 – November 1, 1987) was a reporter, a minister of the government of Quebec (1960–1966), the founder of the Parti Québécois
Parti Québécois
political party and the 23rd Premier of Quebec
Premier of Quebec
(November 25, 1976 – October 3, 1985)
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Quimper
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Quimper
Quimper
(French pronunciation: ​[kɛ̃.pɛʁ]; Breton: Kemper, Latin: Civitas Aquilonia or Corisopitum) is a commune and capital of the Finistère
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