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Visual Arts
The visual arts are art forms such as ceramics, drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, design, crafts, photography, video, filmmaking, and architecture. Many artistic disciplines (performing arts, conceptual art, textile arts) involve aspects of the visual arts as well as arts of other types. Also included within the visual arts[1] are the applied arts[2] such as industrial design, graphic design, fashion design, interior design and decorative art.[3] Current usage of the term "visual arts" includes fine art as well as the applied, decorative arts and crafts, but this was not always the case. Before the Arts and Crafts Movement
Arts and Crafts Movement
in Britain and elsewhere at the turn of the 20th century, the term 'artist' was often restricted to a person working in the fine arts (such as painting, sculpture, or printmaking) and not the handicraft, craft, or applied art media
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Vincent Van Gogh
Vincent Willem van Gogh (Dutch: [ˈvɪnsɛnt ˈʋɪləm vɑn ˈɣɔx] ( listen);[note 1] 30 March 1853 – 29 July 1890) was a Dutch Post- Impressionist
Impressionist
painter who is among the most famous and influential figures in the history of Western art. In just over a decade he created about 2,100 artworks, including around 860 oil paintings, most of them in the last two years of his life. They include landscapes, still lifes, portraits and self-portraits, and are characterised by bold colours and dramatic, impulsive and expressive brushwork that contributed to the foundations of modern art. His suicide at 37 followed years of mental illness and poverty. Born into an upper-middle-class family, Van Gogh drew as a child and was serious, quiet and thoughtful. As a young man he worked as an art dealer, often travelling, but became depressed after he was transferred to London
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Image
An image (from Latin: imago) is an artifact that depicts visual perception, for example, a photo or a two-dimensional picture, that has a similar appearance to some subject—usually a physical object or a person, thus providing a depiction of it. Contents1 Characteristics1.1 Still or moving2 Imagery (literary term) 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Images may be two-dimensional, such as a photograph or screen display, or three-dimensional, such as a statue or hologram. They may be captured by optical devices – such as cameras, mirrors, lenses, telescopes, microscopes, etc. and natural objects and phenomena, such as the human eye or water. The word 'image' is also used in the broader sense of any two-dimensional figure such as a map, a graph, a pie chart, or a painting
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Apprentice
An apprenticeship is a system of training a new generation of practitioners of a trade or profession with on-the-job training and often some accompanying study (classroom work and reading). Apprenticeship
Apprenticeship
also enables practitioners to gain a license to practice in a regulated profession. Most of their training is done while working for an employer who helps the apprentices learn their trade or profession, in exchange for their continued labor for an agreed period after they have achieved measurable competencies. Apprenticeships typically last 3 to 7 years
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The Church At Auvers
The Church at Auvers is an oil painting created by Dutch post-impressionist artist Vincent van Gogh in June 1890 which now hangs in the Musée d'Orsay in Paris, France. The actual church is in Place de l'Eglise, Auvers-sur-Oise, France, 27 kilometres (17 mi) north-west of Paris.Contents1 History 2 In popular culture 3 Notes and references 4 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Van Gogh, Artistic breakthrough and final years, Auvers-sur-Oise The Church at Auvers — along with other canvases such as The Town Hall at Auvers and several drawing of small houses with thatched roofs — is reminiscent of scenes from his Nuenen period.[1] A certain nostalgia for the north had already been apparent in his last weeks in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence: in a letter written a couple of weeks before his departure, he wrote "While I was ill I nevertheless did some little canvases from memory which you will see later, memories of the North."[2] He specifically refers to similar wo
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Arts And Crafts Movement
The Arts and Crafts movement
Arts and Crafts movement
was an international movement in the decorative and fine arts that began in Britain and flourished in Europe and North America between about 1880 and 1920, emerging in Japan (the Mingei
Mingei
movement) in the 1920s. It stood for traditional craftsmanship using simple forms, and often used medieval, romantic, or folk styles of decoration. It advocated economic and social reform and was essentially anti-industrial.[1][2][3] It had a strong influence on the arts in Europe until it was displaced by Modernism
Modernism
in the 1930s,[4] and its influence continued among craft makers, designers, and town planners long afterwards.[5] The term was first used by T. J. Cobden-Sanderson
T. J

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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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Decorative Art
The decorative arts are arts or crafts concerned with the design and manufacture of beautiful objects that are also functional. It includes interior design, but not usually architecture. The decorative arts are often categorized in opposition to the "fine arts", namely, painting, drawing, photography, and large-scale sculpture, which generally have no function other than to be seen.Contents1 "Decorative" and "fine" arts 2 Influence of different materials 3 Renaissance
Renaissance
attitudes 4 Arts and Crafts movement 5 See also 6 References and sources 7 Further reading 8 External links"Decorative" and "fine" arts[edit]Surahi, Mughal, 17th Century CE. National Museum, New DelhiThe distinction between the decorative and the fine arts has essentially arisen from the post- Renaissance
Renaissance
art of the West, where the distinction is for the most part meaningful
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Interior Design
Interior design
Interior design
is the art and science of enhancing the interior of a building to achieve a healthier and more aesthetically pleasing environment for the people using the space
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Fashion Design
Fashion
Fashion
design is the art of applying design, aesthetics and natural beauty to clothing and its accessories. It is influenced by cultural and social attitudes, and has varied over time and place. Fashion designers work in a number of ways in designing clothing and accessories such as bracelets and necklaces. Because of the time required to bring a garment onto the market, designers must at times anticipate changes to consumer tastes. Designers conduct research on fashion trends and interpret them for their audience. Their specific designs are used by manufacturers
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Academy
An academy (Attic Greek: Ἀκαδήμεια; Koine
Koine
Greek Ἀκαδημία) is an institution of secondary education, higher learning, research, or honorary membership
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Industrial Design
Industrial design
Industrial design
is a process of design applied to products that are to be manufactured through techniques of mass production.[2][3] Its key characteristic is that design is separated from manufacture: the creative act of determining and defining a product's form and features takes place in advance of the physical act of making a product, which consists purely of repeated, often automated, replication.[4][5] This distinguishes industrial design from craft-based design, where the form of the product is determined by the product's creator at the time of its creation.[6] All manufactured products are the result
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Applied Arts
The applied arts are the application of design and decoration to everyday objects to make them aesthetically pleasing.[1] The term is applied in distinction to the fine arts which aims to produce objects which are beautiful or provide intellectual stimulation
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Graphite
Graphite
Graphite
( /ˈɡræfaɪt/), archaically referred to as plumbago, is a crystalline allotrope of carbon, a semimetal, a native element mineral, and a form of coal.[5] Graphite
Graphite
is the most stable form of carbon under standard conditions
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Chinese Painting
Chinese painting
Chinese painting
is one of the oldest continuous artistic traditions in the world. Painting in the traditional style is known today in Chinese as guóhuà (simplified Chinese: 国画; traditional Chinese: 國畫), meaning "national" or "native painting", as opposed to Western styles of art which became popular in China in the 20th century. Traditional painting involves essentially the same techniques as calligraphy and is done with a brush dipped in black ink or coloured pigments; oils are not used. As with calligraphy, the most popular materials on which paintings are made are paper and silk. The finished work can be mounted on scrolls, such as hanging scrolls or handscrolls
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