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Visual Culture
Visual
Visual
culture is the aspect of culture expressed in visual images. Many academic fields study this subject, including cultural studies, art history, critical theory, philosophy, media studies, and anthropology.Contents1 Overview 2 Visualism 3 Relationship with other areas of study 4 History 5 Difference from image studies 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksOverview[edit] Among theorists working within contemporary culture, this field of study often overlaps with film studies, psychoanalytic theory, sex studies, queer theory, and the study of t
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Visual Studies (journal)
Visual Studies is a triannual peer-reviewed academic journal of visual studies published by Taylor & Francis on behalf of the International Visual Sociology Association. The journal was established in 1986 as Visual Sociology, obtaining its current name in 2002. The editor-in-chief is Darren Newbury (University of Brighton). The journal is abstracted and indexed in the International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Scopus,[1] and the Arts & Humanities Citation Index.[2] References[edit]^ "Content overview". Scopus. Elsevier. Retrieved 2015-05-04.  ^ "Master Journal List". Intellectual Property & Science. Thomson Reuters. Retrieved 2015-05-04. External links[edit]Official website Print: ISSN 1472-586X Online: ISSN 1472-5878This article about a humanities journal is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about academic journals
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William Ivins, Jr.
William Mills Ivins Jr. (1881 – 1961) was curator of the department of prints at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, from its founding in 1916 until 1946, when he was succeeded by A. Hyatt Mayor. The son of William Mills Ivins Sr. (1851 – 1915), a public utility lawyer who had been the 1905 Republican candidate for Mayor of New York City, Ivins studied at Harvard College and the University of Munich before graduating in law from Columbia University in 1907. After nine years' legal practice, he was asked to take on the conservation and interpretation of the Met's print collection. He built up the remarkable collections that can be seen there today, and he wrote many prefaces to exhibition catalogues, as well as other, occasional pieces which were later collected and published
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German Expressionism
German Expressionism
Expressionism
consisted of a number of related creative movements in Germany before the First World War
First World War
that reached a peak in Berlin during the 1920s. These developments in Germany were part of a larger Expressionist movement in north and central European culture in fields such as architecture, dance, painting, sculpture, as well as cinema. This article deals primarily with developments in German Expressionist cinema before and immediately after World War I.Contents1 History1.1 1910s–1930s2 Influence and legacy 3 Cinema and architecture 4 Interpretation 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksHistory[edit]Mary Wigman, pioneer of Expressionist dance
Expressionist dance
(left)1910s–1930s[edit]Still from the 1920 film The Cabinet of Dr. CaligariAmong the first Expressionist films, The Student of Prague[1] (1913), The Cabinet of Dr
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Degenerate Art Exhibition
The Degenerate Art
Degenerate Art
Exhibition (German: Die Ausstellung "Entartete Kunst") was an art exhibition organized by Adolf Ziegler
Adolf Ziegler
and the Nazi Party in Munich
Munich
from 19 July to 30 November 1937. The exhibition presented 650 works of art, confiscated from German museums, and was staged in counterpoint to the concurrent Great German Art Exhibition.[1] The day before the exhibition started, Hitler
Hitler
delivered a speech declaring "merciless war" on cultural disintegration, attacking "chatterboxes, dilettantes and art swindlers".[1] Degenerate art was defined as works that "insult German feeling, or destroy or confuse natural form or simply reveal an absence of adequate manual and artistic skill".[1] One million people attended the exhibition in its first six weeks.[1] A U.S
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John Berger
John Peter Berger (5 November 1926 – 2 January 2017) was an English art critic, novelist, painter and poet. His novel G. won the 1972 Booker Prize, and his essay on art criticism, Ways of Seeing, written as an accompaniment to a BBC
BBC
series, is often used as a university text
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Laura Mulvey
Laura Mulvey
Laura Mulvey
(born 15 August 1941) is a British feminist film theorist. She was educated at St Hilda's College, Oxford. She is currently professor of film and media studies at Birkbeck, University of London
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Visual Pleasure And Narrative Cinema
Laura Mulvey
Laura Mulvey
(born 15 August 1941) is a British feminist film theorist. She was educated at St Hilda's College, Oxford. She is currently professor of film and media studies at Birkbeck, University of London
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Jacques Lacan
Jacques Marie Émile Lacan (/ləˈkɑːn/;[3] French: [ʒak lakɑ̃]; 13 April 1901 – 9 September 1981) was a French psychoanalyst and psychiatrist who has been called "the most controversial psycho-analyst since Freud".[4] Giving yearly seminars in Paris
Paris
from 1953 to 1981, Lacan influenced many leading French intellectuals in the 1960s and the 1970s, especially those associated with post-structuralism
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Gaze
In critical theory, sociology, and psychoanalysis, the gaze (translated from French le regard) is the act of seeing and being seen. Numerous existentialists and phenomenologists have addressed the concept of gaze beginning with Jean-Paul Sartre.[1] Foucault elaborated on gaze to illustrate a particular dynamic in power relations and disciplinary mechanisms in his Discipline and Punish. Derrida
Derrida
also elaborated on the relations of animals and humans via the gaze in The Animal That Therefore I Am
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György Kepes
György Kepes [ˈɟøɾɟ ˈkɛpɛʃ] (October 4, 1906 – December 29, 2001) was a Hungarian-born painter, photographer, designer, educator, and art theorist. After emigrating to the U.S. in 1937, he taught design at the New Bauhaus
New Bauhaus
(later the School of Design, then Institute of Design, then Illinois Institute of Design or IIT) in Chicago. In 1967 He founded the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(MIT) where he taught until his retirement in 1974.[1][2]Contents1 Early years 2 Berlin
Berlin
and London 3 New Bauhaus 4 Years at MIT 5 Vision + Value 6 Writings 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly years[edit] Kepes was born in Selyp, Hungary
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Maurice Merleau-Ponty
Maurice Merleau-Ponty
Maurice Merleau-Ponty
(French: [mɔʁis mɛʁlo pɔ̃ti]; 14 March 1908 – 3 May 1961) was a French phenomenological philosopher, strongly influenced by Edmund Husserl
Edmund Husserl
and Martin Heidegger. The constitution of meaning in human experience was his main interest and he wrote on perception, art, and politics. He was on the editorial board of Les Temps modernes, the leftist magazine established by Jean-Paul Sartre
Jean-Paul Sartre
in 1945. At the core of Merleau-Ponty's philosophy is a sustained argument for the foundational role perception plays in understanding the world as well as engaging with the world. Like the other major phenomenologists, Merleau-Ponty expressed his philosophical insights in writings on art, literature, linguistics, and politics
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Observation
Observation
Observation
is the active acquisition of information from a primary source. In living beings, observation employs the senses. In science, observation can also involve the recording of data via the use of scientific instruments. The term may also refer to any data collected during the scientific activity
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Svetlana Alpers
Svetlana Leontief Alpers (born February 10, 1936[1]) is an American art historian, also a professor, writer and critic.[2] Her specialty is Dutch Golden Age painting, a field she revolutionized with her 1984 book The Art
Art
of Describing.[3] She has also written on Tiepolo, Rubens, Bruegel, and Velázquez, among others.[4]Contents1 Education and career1.1 Critical responses2 Personal life 3 Honors 4 Selected publications 5 ReferencesEducation and career[edit] Svetlana Alpers received her B.A
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Michael Baxandall
Michael David Kighley Baxandall, FBA (18 August 1933 – 12 August 2008) was a British-born art historian and a professor emeritus of Art History at University of California, Berkeley. He taught at the Warburg Institute, University of London, and worked as a curator at the Victoria and Albert Museum. His book Painting and Experience in Fifteenth-Century Italy was profoundly influential in the social history of art, and is (2018) widely used as a textbook in college courses.[1]Contents1 Career 2 Books 3 Death and legacy 4 Publications 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksCareer[edit] Baxandall was born in Cardiff, the only son of David Baxandall, a curator who was at one time director of the National Gallery of Scotland. He went to Manchester Grammar School and studied English at Downing College, Cambridge, where he was taught by F. R. Leavis. In 1955 he departed for the Continent
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Stuart Hall (cultural Theorist)
Stuart McPhail Hall, FBA (3 February 1932 – 10 February 2014) was a Jamaican-born cultural theorist, political activist and sociologist who lived and worked in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
from 1951. Hall, along with Richard Hoggart and Raymond Williams, was one of the founding figures of the school of thought that is now known as British Cultural Studies or The Birmingham School of Cultural Studies.[1] In the 1950s Hall was a founder of the influential New Left
New Left
Review. At the invitation of Hoggart, Hall joined the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies at Birmingham University
Birmingham University
in 1964
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