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Vision Of Dryhthelm
Dryhthelm (fl. c. 700), also known as Drithelm or Drythelm, was a monk associated with the monastery of Melrose known from the Historia Ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum of Bede. According to the latter, before entering the religious life he lived with his family in "a district of Northumbria which is called Incuneningum".[1] Incuneningum is thought by some modern scholars to refer to Cunninghame, now part of Ayrshire.[2] After a battle with illness, that gradually got worse as the days went by, Drythelm temporarily died (c. 700). He came back to life a few hours later, scaring away everyone but his wife.[1] Dryhthelm portioned his wealth out between his wife, sons and the poor, and became a monk at Melrose, where he devoted himself to God. [3] Drythelm’s vision convinced him it was vital to live a devout life on Earth, if he was to be granted immediate entrance into Heaven
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Cunninghame
Coordinates: 55°38′02″N 4°46′48″W / 55.634°N 4.780°W / 55.634; -4.780 Cunninghame
Cunninghame
(Scottish Gaelic: Coineagan) is a former comital district of Scotland
Scotland
and also a district of the Strathclyde
Strathclyde
Region from 1975–1996.Contents1 Historic Cunninghame 2 Local government district 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistoric Cunninghame[edit]Map of Scotland
Scotland
showing the historic district of CunninghameThe origin of the name is uncertain. However a possible derivation (along with the surname Cunningham) is from cuinneag which means 'milk pail' in Gaelic and the Saxon ham which means 'village'.Cunningham Family CrestAround 500 A.D
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Credan
Saint
Saint
Credan of Evesham
Evesham
(died 19 August 780) is a saint in the calendar of the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
and of the Orthodox Church
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals.[5] As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
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List Of Anglo-Saxon Saints
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
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Saint Alban
Saint
Saint
Alban (/ˈɔːlbən, ˈæl-/; Latin: Albanus) is venerated as the first-recorded British Christian
Christian
martyr,[1] and he is considered to be the British protomartyr. Along with fellow Saints Julius and Aaron, Alban is one of three named martyrs recorded at an early date from Roman Britain
Roman Britain
("Amphibalus" was the name given much later to the priest he was said to have been protecting)
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Saint Aldate
Saint
Saint
Aldate /ˈɔːldeɪt/ (died 577) was a bishop of Gloucester, venerated as a saint with the feast day of February 4. Aldate's life is not detailed historically, but he was probably a Briton killed by the Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
at Deorham. He is reported to have roused the countryside to resist pagan invasion forces. He is mentioned in the Sarum and other martyrologies; his feast occurs in a Gloucester calendar (14th-century addition); churches were dedicated to him at Gloucester
Gloucester
and Oxford, as well as a famous Oxford street: St Aldate's, Oxford and a minor street in Gloucester. But nothing seems to be known of him: it was even suggested that his name was a corruption of 'old gate'. References[edit]Baring-Gould and Fisher, ii. 426–8; Early British Kingdoms after 1100, ii
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Amphibalus
Saint Amphibalus
Amphibalus
is a venerated early Christian priest said to have converted Saint Alban
Saint Alban
to Christianity. He occupied a place in British hagiography almost as revered as Saint Alban
Saint Alban
himself.[1] According to many hagiographical accounts, including those of Gildas, Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, and Matthew of Paris, Amphibalus
Amphibalus
was a Roman Christian fleeing religious persecution under Emperor Diocletian. Saint Amphibalus
Amphibalus
was offered shelter by Saint Alban
Saint Alban
in the Roman city of Verulamium, in modern-day England. Saint Alban
Saint Alban
was so impressed with the priest's faith and teaching that he began to emulate him in worship, and eventually became a Christian himself. When Roman soldiers came to seize St
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Arilda Of Oldbury
Saint
Saint
Arilda, or Arild, was an obscure female saint from Oldbury-on-Severn in the English county of Gloucestershire. She probably lived in the 5th or 6th century and may have been of either Anglo-Saxon or Welsh origin. Arilda was a virgin martyr who, according to John Leland, was slain by a youth named Municus when she refused to lie with him. Two churches in Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
are dedicated to Arilda, one at Oldbury-on-Severn near her traditional home, a second ("St Arild's Church") at Oldbury-on-the-Hill. Both places were called 'Aldberie' at the time of the Domesday Book, suggesting that their names may be derived from the saint. There was a shrine to Arilda at St Peter's Abbey, Gloucester, which is now Gloucester Cathedral, but it was destroyed after the Dissolution of the Monasteries. References[edit]G
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Barloc
Chester
Chester
Cathedral
Cathedral
is a Church of England
Church of England
cathedral and the mother church of the Diocese
Diocese
of Chester. It is located in the city of Chester, Cheshire, England. The cathedral (formerly the abbey church of a Benedictine
Benedictine
monastery, dedicated to Saint Werburgh) is dedicated to Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary. Since 1541 it has been the seat of the Bishop
Bishop
of Chester. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building, and part of a heritage site that also includes the former monastic buildings to the north, which are also listed Grade I. The cathedral, typical of English cathedrals in having been modified many times, dates from between 1093 and the early 16th century, although the site itself may have been used for Christian worship since Roman times
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Brannoc Of Braunton
Braunton
Braunton
is an English village, civil parish, ecclesiastical parish and former manor in North Devon. The village is situated 5 miles (8 km) west of Barnstaple. While not the largest village in England, it is amongst the most populous in Devon
Devon
with a population at the 2011 census of 7,353 people.[2] There are two electoral wards (East and West). Their joint population at the above census was 8,218.[3][4] Within the parish is the fertile, low-lying Braunton Great Field, which adjoins the undulating Braunton
Braunton
Burrows, the Core Area in North Devon
Devon
Biosphere Reserve, the largest psammosere (sand dune system) in England
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Branwalator
Branwalator or Breward, also referred to as Branwalader, was a British saint whose relics lay at Milton Abbas
Milton Abbas
in Dorset
Dorset
and Branscombe
Branscombe
in Devon. Believed to come from Brittany, he also gives his name to the parish of Saint
Saint
Brélade, Jersey. "Brelade" is a corruption of "Branwalader". He is also known as Breward or Branuvelladurus or Brélade and Broladre in French.Contents1 Life 2 Veneration 3 Churches and locations3.1 Jersey 3.2 Cornwall4 SourcesLife[edit] Branwalator was a British monk, who is said to have been a bishop in Jersey, although at the time, Jersey
Jersey
would have been part of the ancient diocese of Dol
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Congar Of Congresbury
Saint Congar (also Cumgar or Cungar; Welsh: Cyngar; Latin: Concarius) (c. 470 – 27 November 520), was a Welsh abbot and supposed bishop in Somerset, then in the British kingdom of Somerset, now in England. He grew up in Pembrokeshire
Pembrokeshire
and travelled across the Bristol Channel to found a monastery on Cadbury Hill
Cadbury Hill
at Congresbury
Congresbury
in Somerset. He gave his name to this village and to the parish church at Badgworth. This supposedly became the centre of a bishopric which preceded the Diocese
Diocese
of Bath and Wells. Legend has it that his staff took root when he thrust it into the ground and the resulting yew tree can be seen to this day
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Dachuna
Dachuna was a medieval virgin saint venerated in Cornwall. Probably British in origin, Dachuna is known from the list of resting-places of Hugh Candidus, authored c. 1155.[1] Dachuna, along with Medan and Credan, were allegedly associates of Saint Petroc, whom they rested alongside at the church of Bodmin.[1] Notes[edit]^ a b Blair, "Handlist", p. 563; Jankulak, Medieval Cult of St Petroc, p
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