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Vision For Space Exploration
The Vision for Space Exploration
Vision for Space Exploration
(VSE) was a plan for space exploration announced on January 14, 2004 by President George W. Bush. It was conceived as a response to the Space Shuttle
Space Shuttle
Columbia disaster, the state of human spaceflight at NASA, and as a way to regain public enthusiasm for space exploration
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George W. Bush
Governor of TexasGovernorship43rd President of the United StatesPresidencyTimelinePoliciesDomestic Economic ForeignBush Doctrine International tripsLegislation & Programs Pardons SpaceAppointmentsCabinet Judicial AppointmentsFirst termCampaign for the Presidency2000 General election Primaries Bush v. Gore Florida1st inaugurationSeptember 11 attacks War on TerrorismWar in Afghanistan Invasion of IraqEmail controversySecond termRe-election campaign2004 General election Primaries2nd inaugurationWar in Iraq State of the Union, 2006 2007 Iraq
Iraq
surgeDismissal of U.S
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Robert L. Park
The name Robert is a Germanic given name, from Proto-Germanic *χrōþi- "fame" and *berχta- "bright".[1] Compare Old Dutch Robrecht and Old High German Hrodebert (a compound of hruod "fame, glory" and berht "bright"). It is also in use as a surname.[2][3] After becoming widely used in Continental Europe it entered England in its Old French form Robert, where an Old English cognate form (Hrēodbēorht, Hrodberht, Hrēodbēorð, Hrœdbœrð, Hrœdberð) had existed before the Norman Conquest. The feminine version is Roberta. The Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish form is Roberto. Similar to the name Richard, "Robert" is also a common name in many Germanic languages, including English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, and Icelandic
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Biological Hazard
Biological
Biological
hazards, also known as biohazards, refer to biological substances that pose a threat to the health of living organisms, primarily that of humans. This can include samples of a microorganism, virus or toxin (from a biological source) that can affect human health. It can also include substances harmful to other animals.The term and its associated symbol are generally used as a warning, so that those potentially exposed to the substances will know to take precautions
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In-Situ Resource Utilization
In space exploration, in situ resource utilization (ISRU) is defined as "the collection, processing, storing and use of materials encountered in the course of human or robotic space exploration that replace materials that would otherwise be brought from Earth."[1] ISRU is the practice of leveraging resources found or manufactured on other astronomical objects (the Moon, Mars, asteroids, etc.) to fulfill or enhance the requirements and capabilities of a space mission. ISRU can provide materials for life support, propellants, construction materials, and energy to a spacecraft payloads or space exploration crews. It is now very common for spacecraft and robotic planetary surface mission to harness the solar radiation found in situ in the form of solar panels
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Space Program
Lists of space programs include:List of government space agencies List of private spa
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Radio Astronomy
Radio astronomy
Radio astronomy
is a subfield of astronomy that studies celestial objects at radio frequencies. The first detection of radio waves from an astronomical object was in 1932, when Karl Jansky
Karl Jansky
at Bell Telephone Laboratories observed radiation coming from the Milky Way. Subsequent observations have identified a number of different sources of radio emission. These include stars and galaxies, as well as entirely new classes of objects, such as radio galaxies, quasars, pulsars, and masers. The discovery of the cosmic microwave background radiation, regarded as evidence for the Big Bang
Big Bang
theory, was made through radio astronomy. Radio astronomy
Radio astronomy
is conducted using large radio antennas referred to as radio telescopes, that are either used singularly, or with multiple linked telescopes utilizing the techniques of radio interferometry and aperture synthesis
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Ionosphere
The ionosphere (/aɪˈɒnəˌsfɪər/[1][2]) is the ionized part of Earth's upper atmosphere, from about 60 km (37 mi) to 1,000 km (620 mi) altitude, a region that includes the thermosphere and parts of the mesosphere and exosphere. The ionosphere is ionized by solar radiation
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U.S. Congress
535 voting members100 senators 435 representatives6 non-voting membersSenate political groups     Republican (51)      Democratic (47)      Independent (2) (caucusing with Democrats)House of Representatives political groups     Republican (238)      Democratic (193)      Vacant (4)ElectionsSenate last electionNovember 8, 2016House of Representatives last electionNovember 8, 2016Meeting place United States
United States
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Dave Weldon
David "Dave" Joseph Weldon (born August 31, 1953, Amityville, New York) is an American politician and physician. He was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Florida's 15th congressional district, and was an unsuccessful candidate for the Republican nomination in Florida's 2012 U.S. Senate race.Contents1 Early life, education, and medical career 2 U.S. House of Representatives2.1 Elections 2.2 Tenure 2.3 Committee assignments 2.4 Caucus memberships3 2012 U.S. Senate election 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarly life, education, and medical career[edit] Weldon was born on Long Island, New York to Anna (née Mallardi) and David Weldon Sr. His father was a combat-decorated World War II veteran. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa from SUNY Stony Brook in 1978, he earned his M.D. degree at the University at Buffalo School of Medicine in 1981. He was inducted into Alpha Omega Alpha
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Bill (proposed Law)
A bill is proposed legislation under consideration by a legislature.[1] A bill does not become law until it is passed by the legislature and, in most cases, approved by the executive. Once a bill has been enacted into law, it is called an act of the legislature, or a statute.Contents1 Usage 2 Preparation 3 Introduction 4 Legislative stages 5 Enactment and after5.1 Approval 5.2 Afterwards6 Numbering of bills 7 See also 8 References 9 External links9.1 Hong Kong 9.2 India 9.3 Ireland 9.4 New Zealand 9.5 United Kingdom 9.6 United StatesUsage[edit] The term bill is primarily used in Anglophone nations
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Counterweight
A counterweight is a weight that, by exerting an opposite force, provides balance and stability of a mechanical system.[1] Its purpose is to make lifting the load more efficient, which saves energy and is less taxing on the lifting machine.[2] Counterweights are often used in traction lifts (elevators), cranes and funfair rides. In these applications, the expected load multiplied by the distance that load will be spaced from the central support (called the "tipping point") must be equal to the counterweight's mass times its distance from the tipping point in order to prevent over-balancing either side. This distance times mass is called the load moment.[3] A counterbalance is a weight or force that balances or offsets another as when two objects of equal weight, power, or influence are acting in opposition to each other
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NASA Authorization Act Of 2005
Authorization is the function of specifying access rights/privileges to resources related to information security and computer security in general and to access control in particular.[1] More formally, "to authorize" is to define an access policy. For example, human resources staff is normally authorized to access employee records and this policy is usually formalized as access control rules in a computer system. During operation, the system uses the access control rules to decide whether access requests from (authentication) shall be approved (granted) or disapproved (rejected) [2]. Resources include individual files or an item's data, computer programs, computer devices and functionality provided by computer applications
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Atlas V
Atlas V
Atlas V
(pronounced "atlas five") is an expendable launch system in the Atlas rocket family. It was formerly operated by Lockheed Martin and is now operated by United Launch Alliance
United Launch Alliance
(ULA), a joint venture with Boeing. Each Atlas V
Atlas V
rocket uses a Russian-built RD-180
RD-180
engine burning kerosene and liquid oxygen to power its first stage and an American-built RL10
RL10
engine burning liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen to power its Centaur upper stage. The RD-180
RD-180
engines are provided by RD Amross, while Aerojet Rocketdyne
Aerojet Rocketdyne
provides both the RL10
RL10
engines and the strap-on boosters used in some configurations. The standard payload fairing sizes are 4 or 5 meters in diameter and of various lengths
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Lunar Ice
Lunar water is water that is present on the Moon. Liquid water cannot persist at the Moon's surface, and water vapor is decomposed by sunlight, with hydrogen quickly lost to outer space
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Buzz Aldrin
Buzz Aldrin
Buzz Aldrin
(born Edwin Eugene Aldrin Jr.; January 20, 1930) is an American engineer, former astronaut, and Command Pilot in the United States Air Force. As Lunar Module
Lunar Module
Pilot on the Apollo 11
Apollo 11
mission, he and mission commander Neil Armstrong
Neil Armstrong
were the first two humans to land on the Moon. Aldrin set foot on the Moon
Moon
at 03:15:16 on July 21, 1969 (UTC), 9 minutes after Armstrong first touched the surface
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