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Virtual Communities
A virtual community is a social network of individuals who interact through specific social media, potentially crossing geographical and political boundaries in order to pursue mutual interests or goals. Some of the most pervasive virtual communities are online communities operating under social networking services. The term virtual community is attributed to the book of the same title published by Howard Rheingold
Howard Rheingold
in 1993. The book's discussion ranges from Rheingold's adventures on The WELL, computer-mediated communication and social groups and information science. Technologies cited include Usenet, MUDs (Multi-User Dungeon) and their derivatives MUSHes and MOOs, Internet Relay Chat
Internet Relay Chat
(IRC), chat rooms and electronic mailing lists
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Dating Search Engine
Online dating (or Internet dating) is a system that enables strangers to find and introduce themselves to new personal connections over the Internet, usually with the goal of developing personal, romantic, or sexual relationships. An online dating service is a company that provides specific mechanisms (generally websites or applications) for online dating through the use of Internet-connected personal computers or mobile devices. Such companies offer a wide variety of unmoderated matchmaking services, most of which are profile-based. Online dating services allow users to become "members" by creating a profile and uploading personal information including (but not limited to) age, gender, sexual orientation, location, and appearance. Most services also encourage members to add photos or videos to their profile
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Taste Of Home
Taste of Home
Taste of Home
magazine is an American cooking publication, founded by Roy Reiman, publisher of Reiman Publications,[1] and is currently owned by Trusted Media Brands, Inc..[2] History and profile[edit] The magazine was first published in 1993.[3] It specializes in recipe exchange and Midwestern cuisine. Taste of Home
Taste of Home
used to be dependent entirely on subscriber revenue for its income, taking no advertising. However, in Fall 2007, the magazine began including advertising (as noted by the editors in the December 2007 issue). Taste of Home
Taste of Home
has a circulation of 3.5 million subscribers, as well as satellite magazines, Country Woman and Simple and Delicious and is noted as the America's #1 cooking magazine. Enthusiasts can access all past published recipes from Taste of Home and its sister-publications through the magazine's website, Tasteofhome.com
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The Wealth Of Networks
The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom is a book by Harvard Law School professor Yochai Benkler published by Yale University Press on April 3, 2006.[1] A PDF of the book is downloadable under a Creative Commons Noncommercial Sharealike license.[2] Benkler has said that his editable online book is "an experiment of how books might be in the future", demonstrating how authors and readers might connect instantly or even collaborate.[3]Contents1 Summary1.1 Part 1: The Networked Information Economy1.1.1 Goods 1.1.2 Peer production 1.1.3 The economics of social production1.2 Part 2: The Political Economy of Property and Commons1.2.1 From passive to active1.3 Part 3: Policies of Freedom at a Moment of Transformation2 Reception2.1 Writing style 2.2 Physical hardware and infrastructure 2.3 Optimism 2.4 The future of information policy and network development3 See also 4 References 5 Exter
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PhpBB
phpBB is an Internet forum
Internet forum
package in the PHP
PHP
scripting language. The name "phpBB" is an abbreviation of PHP
PHP
Bulletin Board
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Internet Forum
An Internet
Internet
forum, or message board, is an online discussion site where people can hold conversations in the form of posted messages.[1] They differ from chat rooms in that messages are often longer than one line of text, and are at least temporarily archived. Also, depending on the access level of a user or the forum set-up, a posted message might need to be approved by a moderator before it becomes visible. Forums have a specific set of jargon associated with them; example: a single conversation is called a "thread", or topic. A discussion forum is hierarchical or tree-like in structure: a forum can contain a number of subforums, each of which may have several topics. Within a forum's topic, each new discussion started is called a thread, and can be replied to by as many people as so wish. Depending on the forum's settings, users can be anonymous or have to register with the forum and then subsequently log in in order to post messages
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Conversation
Conversation
Conversation
is interactive communication between two or more people. The development of conversational skills and etiquette is an important part of socialization
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CB Simulator
CompuServe CB Simulator was the first[1] dedicated online chat service that was widely available to the public. It was developed by a CompuServe executive, Alexander "Sandy" Trevor, and released by CompuServe on February 21, 1980, as the first public, commercial multi-user chat program.[2] At that time, most people were familiar with citizens band radio, often abbreviated as CB radio, but multi-user chat and instant messaging were largely unknown. CompuServe CB used the CB radio paradigm to help users understand the new concept. Like CB radio it had 40 "channels" and commands like "tune", "squelch", and "monitor". CompuServe CB quickly became the largest single product on CompuServe despite virtually no marketing. When 40 channels was not enough, additional "bands" were added, such as the "Adult" band. The first online wedding occurred on CompuServe CB, and worldwide fans organized events to meet in the "real world" people they had met in CB
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Virtual World
A virtual world is a computer-based simulated environment[1] which may be populated by many users who can create a personal avatar, and simultaneously and independently explore the virtual world, participate in its activities and communicate with others.[2] These avatars can be textual, two or three-dimensional graphical representations, or live video avatars with auditory and touch sensations.[3][4] In general, virtual worlds allow for multiple users but single player computer games, such as Skyrim, can also be considered a type of virtual world.[5] The user accesses a computer-simulated world which presents perceptual stimuli to the user, who in turn can manipulate elements of the modeled world and thus experience a degree of presence.[6] Such modeled worlds and their rules may draw from reality or fantasy worlds. Example rules are gravity, topography, locomotion, real-time actions, and communication
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Avatar (computing)
In computing, an avatar is the graphical representation of the user or the user's alter ego or character. An icon or figure representing a particular person in a video game, Internet
Internet
forum, etc. It may take either a three-dimensional form,[1] as in games or virtual worlds, or a two-dimensional form as an icon in Internet
Internet
forums and other online communities.[2][3] Avatar
Avatar
images have also been referred to as "picons" (personal icons)[4] in the past, though the usage of this term is uncommon now
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Whyville
Whyville is an educational Internet site geared towards children from ages 8–14+ founded and managed by Numedeon, Inc. Whyville engages its users in learning about a broad range of topics, including science, business, art and geography. Whyville is extremely popular, and has a registered base of more than 7 million users.[1] Whyville's users (Whyvillians) engage in virtual world simulation based games and role play sponsored by a wide range of governmental, non-profit, and corporate entities. Whyville was launched in 1999, by Numedeon Inc, which was founded by Dr. James M
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Henry Jenkins
Henry Jenkins
Henry Jenkins
III (born June 4, 1958) is an American media scholar and Provost Professor of Communication, Journalism, and Cinematic Arts, a joint professorship at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
Journalism
and the USC School of Cinematic Arts.[1] He also has a joint faculty appointment with the USC Rossier School of Education.[2] Previously, Jenkins was the Peter de Florez Professor of Humanities
Humanities
as well as co-founder[3] and co-director (with William Uricchio) of the Comparative Media Studies program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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Mark Granovetter
Mark Granovetter (born October 20, 1943) is an American sociologist and professor at Stanford University.[1] Granovetter was recently recognized as a Citation Laureate by Thomson Reuters and added to that organization’s list of predicted Nobel Prize winners in economics for the year 2014. Data from the Web of Science show that Granovetter has written both the first and third most cited sociology articles. He is best known for his work in social network theory and in economic sociology, particularly his theory on the spread of information in social networks known as "The Strength of Weak Ties" (1973).[2]Contents1 Background 2 Major ideas2.1 The strength of weak ties 2.2 Economic sociology: Embeddedness 2.3 "Tipping points" / threshold models 2.4 Security influence3 Bibliography (selected) 4 See also 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Granovetter earned an A.B. in History at Princeton University (1965) and a Ph.D in Sociology at Harvard University (1970)
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Privacy
Privacy
Privacy
is the ability of an individual or group to seclude themselves, or information about themselves, and thereby express themselves selectively. The boundaries and content of what is considered private differ among cultures and individuals, but share common themes. When something is private to a person, it usually means that something is inherently special or sensitive to them. The domain of privacy partially overlaps security (confidentiality), which can include the concepts of appropriate use, as well as protection of information. Privacy
Privacy
may also take the form of bodily integrity.[1] The right not to be subjected to unsanctioned invasion of privacy by the government, corporations or individuals is part of many countries' privacy laws, and in some cases, constitutions. Almost all countries have laws which in some way limit privacy
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American Journal Of Sociology
Established in 1895 as the first US scholarly journal in its field, American Journal of Sociology
Sociology
(AJS) presents pathbreaking work from all areas of sociology, with an emphasis on theory building and innovative methods. AJS strives to speak to the general sociology reader and is open to contributions from across the social sciences—political science, economics, history, anthropology, and statistics in addition to sociology—that seriously engage the sociological literature to forge new ways of understanding the social. AJS offers a substantial book review section that identifies the most salient work of both emerging and enduring scholars of social science. Commissioned review essays appear occasionally, offering the readers a comparative, in-depth examination of prominent titles.Contents1 Past editors 2 Roger V
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Dystopia
A dystopia (from the Greek δυσ- "bad" and τόπος "place"; alternatively, cacotopia,[1] kakotopia, or simply anti-utopia) is a community or society that is undesirable or frightening.[2][3] It is translated as "not-good place" and is an antonym of utopia, a term that was coined by Sir Thomas More
Thomas More
and figures as the title of his best known work, Utopia, published 1516, a blueprint for an ideal society with minimal crime, violence and poverty. Dystopian societies appear in many artistic works, particularly in stories set in the future. Some of the most famous examples are George Orwell's 1984 and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Dystopias are often characterized by dehumanization,[2] totalitarian governments, environmental disaster,[3] or other characteristics associated with a cataclysmic decline in society
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