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Virgil Finlay
Virgil Finlay
Virgil Finlay
(July 23, 1914 – January 18, 1971) was an American pulp fantasy, science fiction and horror illustrator. He has been called "part of the pulp magazine history ... one of the foremost contributors of original and imaginative art work for the most memorable science fiction and fantasy publications of our time."[2] While he worked in a range of media, from gouache to oils, Finlay specialized in, and became famous for, detailed pen-and-ink drawings accomplished with abundant stippling, cross-hatching, and scratchboard techniques
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Cordwainer Smith
Cordwainer Smith
Cordwainer Smith
(/ˈkɔːrdweɪnər/, KORD-waynər)[1] was the pen-name used by American author Paul Myron Anthony Linebarger (July 11, 1913 – August 6, 1966) for his science fiction works. Linebarger was a noted East Asia
East Asia
scholar and expert in psychological warfare. ("Cordwainer" is an archaic word for "a worker in cordwain or cordovan leather; a shoemaker",[2] and a "smith" is "one who works in iron or other metals; esp. a blacksmith or farrier":[2] two kinds of skilled workers with traditional materials.) Linebarger also employed the literary pseudonyms "Carmichael Smith" (for his political thriller Atomsk), "Anthony Bearden" (for his poetry) and "Felix C. Forrest" (for the novels Ria and Carola)
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Rochester, New York
Rochester (/ˈrɒtʃɪstər, ˈrɒtʃɛstər/) is a city on the southern shore of Lake Ontario
Lake Ontario
in western New York. With a population of 208,880 residents, Rochester is the seat of Monroe County and the third most populous city in New York state, after New York City
New York City
and Buffalo. The metropolitan area has a population of just over 1 million people.[4] Rochester was one of America's first boomtowns, initially due to its flour mills along the Genesee River, and then as a manufacturing hub.[5] Several of the region's universities (notably the University of Rochester and Rochester Institute of Technology) have renowned research programs. Rochester is the site of many important inventions and innovations in consumer products. The Rochester area has been the birthplace to Kodak, Western Union, Bausch & Lomb, Gleason and Xerox, which conduct extensive research and manufacturing of industrial and consumer products
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Okinawa
Okinawa Prefecture
Okinawa Prefecture
(Japanese: 沖縄県, Hepburn: Okinawa-ken, Okinawan: ウチナーチン Uchinaa-chin) is the southernmost prefecture of Japan.[1] It encompasses two thirds of the Ryukyu Islands in a chain over 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) long. The Ryukyu Islands
Ryukyu Islands
extend southwest from Kyushu
Kyushu
(the southwesternmost of Japan's four main islands) to Taiwan. Naha, Okinawa's capital, is located in the southern part of Okinawa Island.[2] Although Okinawa Prefecture
Okinawa Prefecture
comprises just 0.6 percent of Japan's total land mass, about 75 percent of all United States military personnel stationed in Japan
Japan
are assigned to installations in the prefecture.[3] Currently about 26,000 U.S
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Astrology
Expand list for reference▼ Astrology► Astrology
Astrology
images► Astrology
Astrology
stubs► Astrologers► Astrological ages► Astrological data collectors► Astrological organizations► Astrological signs► History of astrology►
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Seabury Quinn
Seabury Grandin Quinn (also known as Jerome Burke; December 1889 – 24 December 1969) was an American pulp magazine author, most famous for his stories of the occult detective Jules de Grandin, published in Weird Tales.[1] Biography[edit] He was born and lived in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
In 1910, he graduated from the law school of the National University and admitted to the District of Columbia Bar. He served in World War I; after his Army service he became editor of a group of trade papers in New York, where he taught medical jurisprudence and wrote technical articles and pulp magazine fiction. His first published work was "The Law of the Movies", in The Motion Picture Magazine, December 1917. (His story "Painted Gold" may have been written earlier.) "Demons of the Night" was published in Detective Story Magazine on March 19, 1918, followed by "Was She Mad?" on March 25, 1918. He published "The Stone Image" in 1919
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web, founded by the Internet Archive, a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco. Its founders, Brewster Khale and Bruce Gilliat developed the Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
with the intention of providing "universal access to all knowledge" by preserving archived copies of defunct webpages. Since its launch in 2001, over 452 billion pages have been added to the archive
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Internet Speculative Fiction Database
The Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB) is a database of bibliographic information on genres considered speculative fiction, including science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction.[2][3] The ISFDB is a volunteer effort, with both the database and wiki being open for editing and user contributions. The ISFDB database and code are available under Creative Commons licensing[4] and there is support within both and ISFDB for interlinking.[5] The data is reused by other organizations, such as Freebase, under the creative commons license.[6]Contents1 Purpose 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPurpose[edit] The ISFDB database indexes authors, novels, short stories, publishers, awards, and magazines. Additionally, it supports author pseudonyms, series, awards, and cover art plus interior illustration credits which is combined into integrated author, artist, and publisher bibliographies
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Locus Publications
Locus: The Magazine of The Science Fiction & Fantasy
Fantasy
Field, is an American magazine published monthly in Oakland, California. It is considered the news organ and trade journal for the English language science fiction and fantasy fields.[1] It also publishes comprehensive listings of all new books published in the genres.[2] The magazine also presents the annual Locus Awards. Locus Online was launched in April 1997, as a semi-autonomous web version of Locus Magazine.[3]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Charles N. Brown, Ed Meskys, and Dave Vanderwerf founded Locus in 1968 as a news fanzine to promote the (ultimately successful) bid to host the 1971 World Science Fiction Convention in Boston, Massachusetts. Originally intended to run only until the site-selection vote was taken at St. Louiscon, the 1969 Worldcon in St
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Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center in Culpeper, Virginia.[1] The library's functions are overseen by the librarian of Congress, and its buildings are maintained by the architect of the Capitol
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Retro Hugos
The Hugo Awards are a set of literary awards given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The awards are named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and were officially named the Science Fiction Achievement Awards until 1992. Organized and overseen by the World Science Fiction Society, the awards are given each year at the annual World Science Fiction Convention as the central focus of the event. They were first given in 1953, at the 11th World Science Fiction Convention, and have been awarded every year since 1955
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Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
(PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to "encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks".[2] It was founded in 1971 by American writer Michael S. Hart and is the oldest digital library.[3] Most of the items in its collection are the full texts of public domain books. The project tries to make these as free as possible, in long-lasting, open formats that can be used on almost any computer. As of 23 June 2018[update], Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
reached 57,000 items in its collection of free eBooks.[4] The releases are available in plain text but, wherever possible, other formats are included, such as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and Plucker. Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available
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Internet Archive
Coordinates: 37°46′56″N 122°28′18″W / 37.782321°N 122.47161137°W / 37.782321; -122.47161137Internet ArchiveType of business 501(c)(3) nonprofitType of siteDigital libraryAvailable inEnglishFoundedMay 12, 1996; 23 years ago (1996-05-12)[notes 1][2]HeadquartersRichmond DistrictSan Francisco, California, U.S.ChairmanBrewster KahleServicesArchive-It, Open Library, Wayback Machine
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially-based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names. The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
prepared cards of bibliographic information for their library catalog and would sell duplicate sets of the cards to other libraries for use in their catalogs
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. ISNI can be used to disambiguate names that might otherwise be confused, and links the data about names that are collected and used in all sectors of the media industries. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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