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Village
A village is a clustered human settlement or community, larger than a hamlet but smaller than a town, with a population ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand. Though often located in rural areas, the term urban village is also applied to certain urban neighborhoods. Villages are normally permanent, with fixed dwellings; however, transient villages can occur. Further, the dwellings of a village are fairly close to one another, not scattered broadly over the landscape, as a dispersed settlement. In the past, villages were a usual form of community for societies that practice subsistence agriculture, and also for some non-agricultural societies. In Great Britain, a hamlet earned the right to be called a village when it built a church.[1] In many cultures, towns and cities were few, with only a small proportion of the population living in them
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Boroughs And Neighborhoods Of Berlin
Berlin
Berlin
is both a city and one of Germany’s federal states (See: City state). Since a 2001 administrative reform, it has been made up of twelve boroughs or districts (German: Bezirke, pronounced [bəˈtsɪʁkə]), each with its own local government, though all boroughs are subject to Berlin’s city and state government. Each borough is governed by a council (Bezirksamt) with five councillors (Bezirksstadträte) and a borough mayor (Bezirksbürgermeister). The borough council is elected by the borough assembly (Bezirksverordnetenversammlung). The borough governments' power is limited, and subordinate to the Berlin
Berlin
Senate
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Dwellings
In law, a dwelling (also residence, abode) is a self-contained unit of accommodation used by one or more households as a home, such as a house, apartment, mobile home, houseboat or other 'substantial' structure. A dwelling typically includes nearby outbuildings, sheds, etc. within the curtilage of the property, excluding any 'open fields beyond'
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Shirakawa-gō
The Historic Villages of Shirakawa-gō and Gokayama
Gokayama
are one of Japan's UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Sites. The cultural property consists of three historic mountain villages over an area of 68 hectares (170 acres) in the remote Shogawa river valley, stretching across the border of Gifu and Toyama Prefectures in central Japan. Shirakawa-gō (白川郷, "White River Old-District") is located in the village of Shirakawa in Gifu Prefecture
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Li (unit)
The li (Chinese: 里, lǐ, or 市里, shìlǐ), also known as the Chinese mile, is a traditional Chinese unit of distance. The li has varied considerably over time but was usually about a third as long as the English mile and now has a standardized length of a half-kilometer (500 meters or 1,640 feet). This is then divided into 1,500 chi or "Chinese feet". The character 里 combines the characters for "field" (田, tián) and "earth" (土, tǔ), since it was considered to be about the length of a single village. As late as the 1940s, a "li" did not represent a fixed measure but could be longer or shorter depending on the effort required to cover the distance.[1] There is also another li (Traditional: 釐, Simplified: 厘, lí) that indicates a unit of length ​1⁄1000 of a chi, but it is used much less commonly
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Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan[b] (Kazakh: Қазақстан, translit. Qazaqstan, IPA: [qɑzɑqˈstɑn] ( listen); Russian: Казахстан, IPA: [kəzɐxˈstan]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
(Kazakh: Қазақстан Республикасы, translit. Qazaqstan Respýblıkasy; Russian: Республика Казахстан, tr. Respublika Kazakhstan),[4][13] is the world's largest landlocked country, and the ninth largest in the world, with an area of 2,724,900 square kilometres (1,052,100 sq mi).[4][14] Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
is the dominant nation of Central Asia
Central Asia
economically, generating 60% of the region's GDP, primarily through its oil/gas industry
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Kazakh Language
 Kazakhstan  Russia Altai Republic[1] ChinaIli Kazakh Autonomous PrefectureRegulated by Kazakh language
Kazakh language
agencyLanguage codesISO 639-1 kkISO 639-2 kazISO 639-3 kazGlottolog kaza1248[2]Linguasphere 44-AAB-ccThe Kazakh-speaking world:   regions where Kazakh is the language of the majority   regions where Kazakh is the language of a significant minorityThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.Kazakh (natively қазақ тілі, qazaq tili, pronounced [qɑˈzɑq tɘˈlɘ]) belongs to the Kipchak branch of the Turkic languages. It is closely related to Nogai, Kyrgyz, and Karakalpak
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Aul
An aul (Chechen: oil, Russian: аул, Turkic: awıl) is a type of fortified village found throughout the Caucasus
Caucasus
mountains. Etimology[edit] The word itself is of Turkic origin and simply means village in many Turkic languages. Auyl (Kazakh: Ауыл) is a Kazakh word meaning "village" in Kazakhstan.[1] Description[edit] The auls of Svaneti
Svaneti
(in the Republic of Georgia), with their distinctive medieval towers, have been recognized as a World Heritage Site.[2] Comparable towers may be found elsewhere in the Caucasus, specifically in Ingushetia. The auls are generally built out of stone, on faces of ridges or against cliffs in order to provide protection against surprise attacks. Houses are usually two stories high, and they are staggered to make it virtually impossible for enemies to get anywhere on the roads
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Million
1,000,000
1,000,000
(one million), or one thousand thousand, is the natural number following 999,999 and preceding 1,000,001
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2011 Census Of India
The 15th Indian Census was conducted in two phases, house listing and population enumeration. House listing phase began on 1 April 2010 and involved collection of information about all buildings. Information for National Population Register was also collected in the first phase, which will be used to issue a 12-digit unique identification number to all registered Indian residents by Unique Identification Authority of India
India
(UIDAI). The second population enumeration phase was conducted between 9 and 28 February 2011. Census has been conducted in India
India
since 1872 and 2011 marks the first time biometric information was collected. According to the provisional reports released on 31 March 2011, the Indian population increased to 121 crore with a decadal growth of 17.64%.[2] Adult literacy rate increased to 74.04% with a decadal growth of 9.21%
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Gandhi
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (/ˈɡɑːndi, ˈɡæn-/;[3] Hindustani: [ˈmoːɦənd̪aːs ˈkərəmtʃənd̪ ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( listen); 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India
India
to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable")[4]—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa[5]—is now used worldwide
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India
India, officially the Republic
Republic
of India
India
(IAST: Bhārat Gaṇarājya),[e] is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country (with over 1.2 billion people), and the most populous democracy in the world. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
on the southeast. It shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[f] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the northeast; and Myanmar
Myanmar
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India
India
is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives
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Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Rajasthan
(/ˈrɑːdʒəstæn/ Hindustani pronunciation: [raːdʒəsˈt̪ʰaːn] ( listen); literally, "Land of Kings")[4] is India's largest state by area (342,239 square kilometres (132,139 sq mi) or 10.4% of India's total area). It is located on the north western side of the India, where it comprises most of the wide and inhospitable Thar Desert (also known as the " Rajasthan
Rajasthan
Desert" and "Great Indian Desert") and shares a border with the Pakistani provinces of Punjab to the northwest and Sindh
Sindh
to the west, along the Sutlej- Indus
Indus
river valley
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Artisan Fishing
Artisanal fishing
Artisanal fishing
(or traditional/subsistence fishing) are various small-scale, low-technology, low-capital, fishing practices undertaken by individual fishing households (as opposed to commercial companies).[1] Many of these households are of coastal or island ethnic groups. These households make short (rarely overnight) fishing trips close to the shore. Their produce is usually not processed and is mainly for local consumption. Artisan fishing uses traditional fishing techniques such as rod and tackle, fishing arrows and harpoons, cast nets, and small (if any) traditional fishing boats. Artisan fishing may be undertaken for both commercial and subsistence reasons
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Subsistence Agriculture
Subsistence agriculture
Subsistence agriculture
is a self-sufficiency farming system in which the farmers focus on growing enough food to feed themselves and their entire families. The output is mostly for local requirements with little or no surplus trade. The typical subsistence farm has a range of crops and animals needed by the family to feed and clothe themselves during the year. Planting decisions are made principally with an eye toward what the family will need during the coming year, and secondarily toward market prices
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Dispersed Settlement
A dispersed settlement, also known as a scattered settlement, is one of the main types of settlement patterns used by landscape historians to classify rural settlements found in England
England
and other parts of the world. Typically, there are a number of separate farmsteads scattered throughout the area.[1] A dispersed settlement contrasts with a nucleated village. The French term bocage is sometimes used to describe the type of landscape found where dispersed settlements are common. In addition to Western Europe, dispersed patterns of settlement are found in parts of Papua New Guinea, as among the Gainj, Ankave, and Baining tribes
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