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Vidivarii
The Vidivarii are described by Jordanes
Jordanes
in his Getica
Getica
as a melting pot of tribes who in the mid-6th century lived at the lower Vistula:[1][2]Ad litus oceani, ubi tribus faucibus fluenta Vistulae fluminibus ebibuntur, Vidivarii resident ex diversis nationibus aggregati.[3]Though differing from the earlier Willenberg culture, some traditions were continued,[2] thus the corresponding archaeological culture is sometimes described as the Vidivarian or widiwar stage of the Willenberg culture
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Jordanes
Jordanes
Jordanes
(/dʒɔːrˈdeɪniːz/),[1] also written Jordanis or, uncommonly, Jornandes,[2] was a 6th-century Eastern Roman bureaucrat of Gothic extraction[3] who turned his hand to history later in life. Jordanes
Jordanes
wrote Romana, about the history of Rome, but his best-known work is his Getica, which was written in Constantinople
Constantinople
[4] about AD 551.[5] It is the only extant ancient work dealing with the early history of the Goths. Jordanes
Jordanes
was asked by a friend to write Getica
Getica
as a summary of a multi-volume history of the Goths
Goths
by the statesman Cassiodorus
Cassiodorus
that had existed then but has since been lost
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Gepids
The Gepids
Gepids
(Latin: Gepidae, Gipedae) were an East Germanic tribe. They were closely related to, or a subdivision of, the Goths. They are first recorded in 6th-century historiography as having been allied with the Goths
Goths
in the invasion of Dacia
Dacia
in c. 260. In the 4th century, they were incorporated into the Hunnic Empire. Under their leader Ardaric, the Gepids
Gepids
united with other Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
and defeated the Huns
Huns
at the Battle of Nedao in 454. The Gepids
Gepids
then founded a kingdom centered on Sirmium, known as Gepidia,[2] which was defeated by the Lombards
Lombards
a century later
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Bishopric Of Cammin
The word diocese (/ˈdaɪəsɪs, -siːs, -siːz/)[a] is derived from the Greek term διοίκησις meaning "administration". When now used in an ecclesiastical sense, it refers to an administrative territorial entity.[2] In the Western Church, the district is under the supervision of a bishop (who may have assistant bishops to help him or her) and is divided into parishes under the care of priests; but in the Eastern Church, the word denotes the area under the jurisdiction of a patriarch and the bishops under his jurisdiction administer parishes.[2] This structure of church governance is known as episcopal polity. The word diocesan means relating or pertaining to a diocese. It can also be used as a noun meaning the bishop who has the principal supervision of a diocese
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Neumark
Coat of arms of Brandenburg, shared by the NeumarkThe Margraviate of Brandenburg
Margraviate of Brandenburg
c. 1320, showing the Neumark
Neumark
as the portion reaching out to the east
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Hun
The Huns
Huns
were a nomadic people who lived in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia
Central Asia
between the 4th and 6th century AD. According to European tradition, they w
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Getica
De origine actibusque Getarum ("The Origin and Deeds of the Getae/Goths"[n 1]),[1] or the Getica,[2] written in Late Latin
Late Latin
by Jordanes
Jordanes
(or Iordanes/Jornandes) in or shortly after 551 AD,[3] claims to be a summary of a voluminous account by Cassiodorus
Cassiodorus
of the origin and history of the Gothic people, which is now lost.[4] However, the extent to which Jordanes
Jordanes
actually used the work of Cassiodorus
Cassiodorus
is unknown. It is significant as the only remaining contemporaneous resource that gives the full story of the origin and history of the Goths
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Goths
The Goths
Goths
were an East Germanic people, two of whose branches, the Visigoths
Visigoths
and the Ostrogoths, played an important role in the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and the emergence of Medieval Europe. The Goths
Goths
dominated a vast area,[1] which at its peak under the Germanic king Ermanaric and his sub-king Athanaric possibly extended all the way from the Danube
Danube
to the Don, and from the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the Baltic Sea.[2] The Goths
Goths
spoke the Gothic language, one of the extinct East Germanic languages
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Vistula
The Vistula
Vistula
(/ˈvɪstjʊlə/; Polish: Wisła
Wisła
[ˈvʲiswa], German: Weichsel [ˈvaɪksl̩], Low German: Wießel, Yiddish: ווייסל‎ Yiddish pronunciation: [vajsl̩]) is the longest and largest river in Poland, at 1,047 kilometres (651 miles) in length. The drainage basin area of the Vistula
Vistula
is 194,424 km2 (75,068 sq mi), of which 168,699 km2 (65,135 sq mi) lies within Poland
Poland
(splitting the country in half)
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Melting Pot
The melting pot is a metaphor for a heterogeneous society becoming more homogeneous, the different elements "melting together" into a harmonious whole with a common culture or vice versa, for a homogeneous society becoming more heterogeneous through the influx of foreign elements with different cultural background with a potential creation of disharmony with the previous culture
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Partitions Of The Duchy Of Pomerania
The Duchy of Pomerania
Duchy of Pomerania
was partitioned several times to satisfy the claims of the male members of the ruling House of Pomerania dynasty.[1] The partitions were named after the ducal residences: Pomerania-Barth, -Demmin, -Rügenwalde, -Stettin, -Stolp, and -Wolgast
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Pomerania-Stolp
Pomerania- Stolp
Stolp
(German: (Teil-)Herzogtum Pommern-Stolp, Polish: księstwo słupskie, "Duchy of Słupsk") was one of the partitions of the Duchy of Pomerania
Duchy of Pomerania
(German: Herzogtum Pommern). Centered in Słupsk, it was created from another partition of the Duchy of Pomerania, Pomerania-Wolgast, to satisfy Bogislaw V, Duke of Pomerania in 1368, and existed until 1459, when it was inherited by Eric II of Pomerania-Wolgast
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Lauenburg And Bütow Land
Lauenburg and Bütow Land[1][2][3] (German: Länder or Lande Lauenburg und Bütow, Kashubian: Lãbòrskò-bëtowskô Zemia, Polish: Ziemia lęborsko-bytowska) formed a historical region in eastern Pomerania. Composed of two districts centered on the towns of Lauenburg (Lębork) and Bütow (Bytów), it was on the western periphery of Pomerelia. The land is today part of the Polish Pomeranian Voivodeship.Contents1 History1.1 Teutonic Order 1.2 Dukes of Pomerania 1.3 Poland and Brandenburg-Prussia2 SourcesHistory[edit] In the 12th and 13th centuries the area east of the Łeba river was on the western periphery of the Pomerelian duchies, ruled by the Samborides dynasty as vassals of the Polish Crown as distinct to the neighbouring Duchy of Pomerania, which in 1181 had become an Imperial State
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Swedish Pomerania
Swedish Pomerania (Swedish: Svenska Pommern; German: Schwedisch-Pommern) was a Dominion under the Swedish Crown from 1630 to 1815, situated on what is now the Baltic coast of Germany and Poland. Following the Polish War and the Thirty Years' War, Sweden held extensive control over the lands on the southern Baltic coast, including Pomerania and parts of Livonia and Prussia (dominium maris baltici). Sweden, present in Pomerania with a garrison at Stralsund since 1628, had gained effective control of the Duchy of Pomerania with the Treaty of Stettin in 1630. At the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 and the Treaty of Stettin in 1653, Sweden received Western Pomerania (German Vorpommern), with the islands of Rügen, Usedom, and Wolin, and a strip of Farther Pomerania (Hinterpommern). The peace treaties were negotiated while the Swedish queen Christina was a minor, and the Swedish Empire was governed by members of the high aristocracy
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