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Video Acceleration API
Video Acceleration API (VA API) is a royalty-free API as well as its implementation as free and open-source library (libVA) distributed under the MIT License. The VA API interface is to be implemented by device drivers to offer end-user software, such as VLC media player
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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H.262/MPEG-2 Part 2
H.262[1] or MPEG-2
MPEG-2
Part 2 (formally known as ITU-T Recommendation H.262 and ISO/IEC 13818-2,[2] also known as MPEG-2
MPEG-2
Video) is a video coding format developed and maintained jointly by ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) and ISO/IEC Moving Picture Experts Group
Moving Picture Experts Group
(MPEG). It is the second part of the ISO/IEC MPEG-2
MPEG-2
standard. The ITU-T Recommendation H.262 and ISO/IEC 13818-2 documents are identical. The standard is available for a fee from the ITU-T[1] and ISO. MPEG-2
MPEG-2
Video is similar to MPEG-1, but also provides support for interlaced video (an encoding technique used in analog NTSC, PAL and SECAM television systems). MPEG-2
MPEG-2
video is not optimized for low bit-rates (less than 1 Mbit/s), but outperforms MPEG-1
MPEG-1
at 3 Mbit/s and above
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FreeBSD
FreeBSD
FreeBSD
is a free and open-source Unix-like
Unix-like
operating system descended from Research Unix
Research Unix
via the Berkeley Software Distribution
Berkeley Software Distribution
(BSD). Although for legal reasons FreeBSD
FreeBSD
cannot use the Unix
Unix
trademark, it is a direct descendant of BSD, which was historically also called "BSD Unix" or "Berkeley Unix"
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Solaris (operating System)
Solaris is a Unix
Unix
operating system originally developed by Sun Microsystems. It superseded their earlier SunOS
SunOS
in 1993. In 2010, after the Sun acquisition by Oracle, it was renamed Oracle Solaris.[2] Solaris is known for its scalability, especially on SPARC
SPARC
systems, and for originating many innovative features such as DTrace, ZFS
ZFS
and Time Slider.[3][4] Solaris supports SPARC
SPARC
and x86-64 workstations and servers from Oracle and other vendors. Solaris is registered as compliant with the Single UNIX Specification.[5] Historically, Solaris was developed as proprietary software
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Framebuffer
A framebuffer (frame buffer, or sometimes framestore) is a portion of RAM[1] containing a bitmap that drives a video display. It is a memory buffer containing a complete frame of data.[2] Modern video cards contain framebuffer circuitry in their cores. This circuitry converts an in-memory bitmap into a video signal that can be displayed on a computer monitor. In computing, a screen buffer is a part of computer memory used by a computer application for the representation of the content to be shown on the computer display.[3] The screen buffer may also be called the video buffer, the regeneration buffer, or regen buffer for short.[4] Screen buffers should be distinguished from video memory. To this end, the term off-screen buffer is also used. The information in the buffer typically consists of color values for every pixel to be shown on the display
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Video Codec
A video codec is an electronic circuit or software that compresses or decompresses digital video. It converts uncompressed video to a compressed format or vice versa. In the context of video compression, "codec" is a concatenation of "encoder" and "decoder"—a device that only compresses is typically called an encoder, and one that only decompresses is a decoder. The compressed data format usually conforms to a standard video compression specification. The compression is typically lossy, meaning that the compressed video lacks some information present in the original video
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Video Coding
In signal processing, data compression, source coding,[1] or bit-rate reduction involves encoding information using fewer bits than the original representation.[2] Compression can be either lossy or lossless. Lossless compression reduces bits by identifying and eliminating statistical redundancy. No information is lost in lossless compression. Lossy compression reduces bits by removing unnecessary or less important information.[3] The process of reducing the size of a data file is often referred to as data compression. In the context of data transmission, it is called source coding; encoding done at the source of the data before it is stored or transmitted.[4] Source coding should not be confused with channel coding, for error detection and correction or line coding, the means for mapping data onto a signal. Compression is useful because it reduces resources required to store and transmit data
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Variable-length Code
In coding theory a variable-length code is a code which maps source symbols to a variable number of bits. Variable-length codes can allow sources to be compressed and decompressed with zero error (lossless data compression) and still be read back symbol by symbol. With the right coding strategy an independent and identically-distributed source may be compressed almost arbitrarily close to its entropy
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IDCT
A discrete cosine transform (DCT) expresses a finite sequence of data points in terms of a sum of cosine functions oscillating at different frequencies. DCTs are important to numerous applications in science and engineering, from lossy compression of audio (e.g. MP3) and images (e.g. JPEG) (where small high-frequency components can be discarded), to spectral methods for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. The use of cosine rather than sine functions is critical for compression, since it turns out (as described below) that fewer cosine functions are needed to approximate a typical signal, whereas for differential equations the cosines express a particular choice of boundary conditions. In particular, a DCT is a Fourier-related transform similar to the discrete Fourier transform
Fourier transform
(DFT), but using only real numbers
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Motion Compensation
Motion compensation
Motion compensation
is an algorithmic technique used to predict a frame in a video, given the previous and/or future frames by accounting for motion of the camera and/or objects in the video. It is employed in the encoding of video data for video compression, for example in the generation of MPEG-2
MPEG-2
files. Motion compensation describes a picture in terms of the transformation of a reference picture to the current picture. The reference picture may be previous in time or even from the future
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Deblocking Filter (video)
A deblocking filter is a video filter applied to decoded compressed video to improve visual quality and prediction performance by smoothing the sharp edges which can form between macroblocks when block coding techniques are used. The filter aims to improve the appearance of decoded pictures. It is a part of the specification for both the SMPTE VC-1 codec and the ITU H.264
H.264
(ISO MPEG-4 AVC) codec.Contents1 H.264
H.264
deblocking filter 2 H.263 Annex J deblocking filter 3 Deblocking filters as post-processors 4 References H.264
H.264
deblocking filter[edit] In contrast with older MPEG-1/2/4 standards, the H.264
H.264
deblocking filter is not an optional additional feature in the decoder. It is a feature on both the decoding path and on the encoding path, so that the in-loop effects of the filter are taken into account in reference macroblocks used for prediction
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MPEG-4 Part 2
MPEG-4 Part 2, MPEG-4 Visual (formally ISO/IEC 14496-2[1]) is a video compression format developed by MPEG. It belongs to the MPEG-4 ISO/IEC standards. It is a discrete cosine transform compression standard, similar to previous standards such as MPEG-1
MPEG-1
Part 2 and H.262/MPEG-2 Part 2. Several popular codecs including DivX, Xvid
Xvid
and Nero Digital implement this standard. Note that MPEG-4 Part 10 defines a different format from MPEG-4 Part 2 and should not be confused with it. MPEG-4 Part 10 is commonly referred to as H.264 or AVC, and was jointly developed by ITU-T and MPEG. MPEG-4 Part 2 is H.263 compatible in the sense that a basic H.263 bitstream is correctly decoded by an MPEG-4 Video decoder
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X Window System
The X Window System
X Window System
(X11, or shortened to simply X) is a windowing system for bitmap displays, common on UNIX-like
UNIX-like
computer operating systems. X provides the basic framework for a GUI environment: drawing and moving windows on the display device and interacting with a mouse and keyboard. X does not mandate the user interface – this is handled by individual programs. As such, the visual styling of X-based environments varies greatly; different programs may present radically different interfaces. X originated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(MIT) in 1984. The protocol[clarification needed] has been version 11 (hence "X11") since September 1987
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H.263
H.263 is a video compression standard originally designed as a low-bit-rate compressed format for videoconferencing. It was developed by the ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) in a project ending in 1995/1996 as one member of the H.26x family of video coding standards in the domain of the ITU-T, and it was later extended to add various additional enhanced features in 1998 and 2000
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H.264/MPEG-4 AVC
H.264 or MPEG-4 Part 10, Advanced Video Coding ( MPEG-4 AVC) is a block-oriented motion-compensation-based video compression standard. As of 2014[update] it is one of the most commonly used formats for the recording, compression, and distribution of video content.[1] It supports resolutions up to 8192×4320, including 8K UHD.[2] The intent of the H.264/AVC project was to create a standard capable of providing good video quality at substantially lower bit rates than previous standards (i.e., half or less the bit rate of MPEG-2, H.263, or MPEG-4 Part 2), without increasing the complexity of design so much that it would be impractical or excessively expensive to implement
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