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Victorian Fashion
Victorian fashion
Victorian fashion
comprises the various fashions and trends in British culture that emerged and developed in the United Kingdom and the British Empire
British Empire
throughout the Victorian era, roughly 1830s to 1900s (decade). The period saw many changes in fashion, including changes in styles, fashion technology and the methods of distribution. Various movement in architecture, literature, and the decorative and visual arts as well as a changing perception of the traditional gender roles also influenced fashion . Under Queen Victoria's rule, England enjoyed a period of economic growth along with technological advancement. Mass production
Mass production
of sewing machines in the 1850s as well as the advent of synthetic dyes introduced major changes in fashion.[1] Clothing could be made quicker and more cheaply
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Fashion Plate
A fashion plate is an illustration (a plate) demonstrating the highlights of fashionable styles of clothing. Traditionally they are rendered through etching, line engraving, or lithograph and then colored by hand. To quote historian James Laver, the best of them tend to "reach a very high degree of aesthetic value."[1] Fashion plates do not usually depict specific people. Instead they take the form of generalized portraits, which simply dictate the style of clothes that a tailor, dressmaker, or store could make or sell, or demonstrate how different materials could be made up into clothes. The majority can be found in ladies' fashion magazines which began to appear during the last decades of the eighteenth century
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Pleat
A pleat (older plait) is a type of fold formed by doubling fabric back upon itself and securing it in place
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Glove
A glove ( Middle English
Middle English
from Old English
Old English
glof) is a garment covering the whole hand. Gloves have separate sheaths or openings for each finger and the thumb; if there is an opening but no (or a short) covering sheath for each finger they are called fingerless gloves. Fingerless gloves having one large opening rather than individual openings for each finger are sometimes called gauntlets, though gauntlets are not necessarily fingerless. Gloves which cover the entire hand or fist but do not have separate finger openings or sheaths are called mittens. Mittens are warmer than other styles of gloves made of the same material because fingers maintain their warmth better when they are in contact with each other
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Congenital Disorder
A birth defect, also known as a congenital disorder, is a condition present at birth regardless of its cause.[3] Birth
Birth
defects may result in disabilities that may be physical, intellectual, or developmental.[3] The disabilities can range from mild to severe.[7] Birth
Birth
defects are divided into two main ty
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Engageante
Engageantes are false sleeves worn with women's clothing. They were worn during the 18th and 19th centuries, with a brief revival in the 20th century. In the 18th century, engageantes took the form of ruffles or flounces of linen, cotton, or lace, tacked to the elbow-length sleeves then fashionable. In the mid-19th century, the term engageante was used for separate false sleeves, usually with fullness gathered tight at the wrist, worn under the open bell-shaped "pagoda" sleeves of day dresses. The fashion reappeared briefly just after the turn of the 20th century. External links[edit]This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations
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Torso
The torso or trunk is an anatomical term for the central part of the many animal bodies (including that of the human) from which extend the neck and limbs.[1] The torso includes the thorax and the abdomen.Contents1 Anatomy1.1 Major organs 1.2 Major muscle groups 1.3 Nerve supply2 See also 3 ReferencesAnatomy[edit] Major organs[edit]Surface projections of major organs of the torso, using the vertebral column and rib cage as main reference sources.Most critical organs are housed within the torso
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Seam (sewing)
In sewing, a seam is the join where two or more layers of fabric, leather, or other materials are held together with stitches. Prior to the invention of the sewing machine, all sewing was done by hand. Seams in modern mass-produced household textiles, sporting goods, and ready-to-wear clothing are sewn by computerized machines, while home shoemaking, dressmaking, quilting, crafts, haute couture and tailoring may use a combination of hand and machine sewing.[1] In clothing construction, seams are classified by their type (plain, lapped, abutted, or French seams[1]) and position in the finished garment (center back seam, inseam, side seam)
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Ruffle
In sewing and dressmaking, a ruffle, frill, or furbelow is a strip of fabric, lace or ribbon tightly gathered or pleated on one edge and applied to a garment, bedding, or other textile as a form of trimming.[1] The term flounce is a particular type of fabric manipulation that creates a similar look but with less bulk. The term derives from earlier terms of frounce or fronce.[2] A wavy effect is achieved without gathers or pleats by cutting a curved strip of fabric and applying the inner or shorter edge to the garment. The depth of the curve as well as the width of the fabric determines the depth of the flounce
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The Princesse De Broglie
The Princesse de Broglie is an oil on canvas painting by the French Neoclassical artist Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres. It was completed between 1851 and 1853 and shows Joséphine-Éléonore-Marie-Pauline de Galard de Brassac de Béarn (1825–1860), known as Pauline, wife of Albert de Broglie, the 28th Prime Minister of France. Albert, who commissioned the portrait, was impressed by Ingres' 1845 portrait of his sister, the Comtesse d'Haussonville.[1] The painting was commissioned around 1850. Pauline was 28 and Albert 31 years by the time of its completion. Pauline suffered from acute shyness throughout her life, and the painting captures this melancholia. She was highly intelligent and deeply religious; Albert published three volumes of her essays on religious history after her death.[2] She had a short life, contracting tuberculosis in her early 30s, from which she died in 1860, aged 35
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Middle Class
The middle class is a class of people in the middle of a social hierarchy. In Weberian socio-economic terms, the middle class is the broad group of people in contemporary society who fall socio-economically between the working class and upper class. The common measures of what constitutes middle class vary significantly among cultures. One of the narrowest definitions limits it to those in the middle fifth of the nation's income ladder
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Sleeve
A sleeve (O. Eng. slieve, or slyf, a word allied to slip, cf. Dutch sloof) is the part of a garment that covers the arm, or through which the arm passes or slips. The pattern of the sleeve is one of the characteristics of fashion in dress, varying in every country and period. Various survivals of the early forms of sleeve are still found in the different types of academic or other robes. Where the long hanging sleeve is worn it has, as still in China
China
and Japan, been used as a pocket, whence has come the phrase to have up one's sleeve, to have something concealed ready to produce. There are many other proverbial and metaphorical expressions associated with the sleeve, such as to wear one's heart upon one's sleeve, and to laugh in one's sleeve. Sleeve
Sleeve
length varies from barely over the shoulder (cap sleeve) to floor-length
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Drapery
Drapery
Drapery
is a general word referring to cloths or textiles (Old French draperie, from Late Latin
Late Latin
drappus[1]). It may refer to cloth used for decorative purposes – such as around windows – or to the trade of retailing cloth, originally mostly for clothing, formerly conducted by drapers. In art history, drapery refers to any cloth or textile depicted, which is usually clothing. The schematic depiction of the folds and woven patterns of loose-hanging clothing on the human form, with ancient prototypes, was reimagined as an adjunct to the female form by Greek vase-painters and sculptors of the earliest fifth century and has remained a major source of stylistic formulas in sculpture and painting, even after the Renaissance
Renaissance
adoption of tighter-fitting clothing styles
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Overskirt
An overskirt, or peplum, is a type of elongated hem resembling a short skirt, worn to lie over another garment, either another skirt such as a petticoat or underskirt, or breeches. Overskirts may serve various purposes, ranging from protecting the underlying clothing from mud and dirt, to being purely a decorative feature. Overskirts have been popular as a clothing detail for both men and women during various periods of history. More recently, they are associated with women's jackets and blouses, included in closely fitted clothing, where they accentuate a narrow waist, or light materials to create a casual sense of elegance. Overskirts first came into fashion during the Victorian Era
Victorian Era
in 1867, after the pre-hoop and hoop periods of multiple petticoats and crinoline, and before the bustle period. A reduction in overall shirt size was seen at this time
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Cuirass
A cuirass (/kwɪˈræs/, /kjuːˈræs/;[1] French: cuirasse, Latin: coriaceus) is a piece of armour, formed of a single or multiple pieces of metal or other rigid material which covers the front of the torso. In a suit of armour, the cuirass was generally connected to a back piece. Cuirass
Cuirass
could also refer to the complete torso-protecting armour.Contents1 Description 2 History2.1 The Japanese cuirass3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] In Hellenistic and Roman times, the musculature of the male torso was idealized in the form of the muscle cuirass[2] or "heroic cuirass" (in French the cuirasse esthétique)[3] sometimes further embellished with symbolic representation in relief, familiar in the Augustus of Prima Porta and other heroic representations in official Roman sculpture
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Ford Madox Brown
Ford Madox Brown
Ford Madox Brown
(16 April 1821 – 6 October 1893) was a French-born British painter of moral and historical subjects, notable for his distinctively graphic and often Hogarthian version of the Pre-Raphaelite
Pre-Raphaelite
style. Arguably, his most notable painting was Work (1852–65). Brown spent the latter years of his life painting the Manchester
Manchester
Murals, depicting Mancunian history, for Manchester
Manchester
Town Hall.Contents1 Early life 2 Works 3 Family 4 Heritage 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksEarly life[edit]Brown, at left, with William Holman Hunt. Caricature
Caricature
by Max Beerbohm from Rossetti and His Circle.Brown was the grandson of the medical theorist John Brown, founder of the Brunonian system of medicine. His great grandfather was a Scottish labourer
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