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Vibraphone
The vibraphone (also known as the vibraharp or simply the vibes) is a musical instrument in the struck idiophone subfamily of the percussion family. It consists of tuned metal bars, and is usually played by holding two or four soft mallets and striking the bars. A person who plays the vibraphone is called a vibraphonist or vibraharpist. The vibraphone resembles the xylophone, marimba, and glockenspiel, one of the main differences between it and these instruments being that each bar is paired with a resonator tube that has a motor-driven butterfly valve at its upper end. The valves are mounted on a common shaft, which produces a tremolo or vibrato effect while spinning. The vibraphone also has a sustain pedal similar to that on a piano
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Luis Russell
Luis Russell (August 5, 1902 – December 11, 1963) was a pioneering Panamanian-born American jazz pianist, orchestra leader, composer, and arranger.Contents1 Career 2 Selected discography 3 External links 4 ReferencesCareer[edit] Luis Carl Russell was born on Careening Cay, near Bocas del Toro, Panama, in a family of Afro-Caribbean ancestry. His father was a music teacher, and young Luis learned to play guitar, piano, and violin. He began playing professionally, accompanying silent films by 1917 and later at a casino in Colón. He won $3000 in a lottery and used it to move to the U.S. with his mother and sister, settling in New Orleans, Louisiana, where he worked as a pianist. He moved to Chicago in 1925 and worked with Doc Cook and King Oliver. The Oliver band moved to New York City, and Russell left to form his own band. By 1929, Russell's band became one of the top jazz groups in New York City
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Vaudeville
Vaudeville
Vaudeville
(/ˈvɔːdvɪl, -dəvɪl/; French: [vodvil]) is a theatrical genre of variety entertainment. It was especially popular in the United States
United States
and Canada
Canada
from the early 1880s until the early 1930s. A typical vaudeville performance was made up of a series of separate, unrelated acts grouped together on a common bill. Types of acts have included popular and classical musicians, singers, dancers, comedians, trained animals, magicians, strongmen, female and male impersonators, acrobats, illustrated songs, jugglers, one-act plays or scenes from plays, athletes, lecturing celebrities, minstrels, and movies. A vaudeville performer is often referred to as a "vaudevillian". Vaudeville
Vaudeville
developed from many sources, including the concert saloon, minstrelsy, freak shows, dime museums, and literary American burlesque
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Jazz
Jazz
Jazz
is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States,[1] in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime.[2] Jazz
Jazz
is seen by many as 'America's classical music'.[3] Since the 1920s Jazz
Jazz
Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American
African-American
and European-American
European-American
musical parentage with a performance orientation.[4] Jazz
Jazz
is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation
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Tiki Bar
A tiki bar is an exotic-themed drinking establishment that serves elaborate cocktails, especially rum-based mixed drinks such as the mai tai and zombie cocktail. Tiki bars are aesthetically defined by their tiki culture décor which is based upon a romanticized conception of tropical cultures, most commonly Polynesian. The interiors and exteriors of tiki bars often include "tiki god" masks and carvings, grasscloth, tapa cloth and tropical fabrics, torches, woven fish traps, and glass floats, bamboo, plants, lava stone, hula girl, palm tree motifs, tropical murals and other South Pacific-themed decorations. Indoor fountains, waterfalls or even lagoons are popular features. Some tiki bars also incorporate a stage for live entertainment such as exotica-style bands or Polynesian dance floor shows
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Vibrato
Vibrato
Vibrato
(Italian, from past participle of "vibrare", to vibrate) is a musical effect consisting of a regular, pulsating change of pitch. It is used to add expression to vocal and instrumental music. Vibrato
Vibrato
is typically characterised in terms of two factors: the amount of pitch variation ("extent of vibrato") and the speed with which the pitch is varied ("rate of vibrato").[1] In singing it can occur spontaneously through variations in the larynx
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Tremolo
In music, tremolo (Italian pronunciation: [ˈtrɛːmolo]), or tremolando ([tremoˈlando]), is a trembling effect. There are two types of tremolo. The first is a rapid reiteration:of a single note, particularly used on bowed string instruments, by rapidly moving the bow back and forth; plucked strings such as on a harp, where it is called bisbigliando (Italian pronunciation: [bizbiʎˈʎando]) or "whispering"; and tremolo picking, in which a single note is repeated extremely rapidly with a plectrum (or "pick") on traditionally plucked string instruments such as guitar, mandolin, etc. between two notes or chords in alternation, an imitation (not to be confused with a trill) of the preceding that is more common on keyboard instruments
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Butterfly Valve
A butterfly valve is a valve that isolates or regulates the flow of a fluid. The closing mechanism is a disk that rotates.Contents1 Principle of operation 2 Types2.1 Wafer-style butterfly valves 2.2 Lug-style butterfly valve 2.3 Rotary valve3 Use in industry 4 History 5 Images 6 See also 7 ReferencesPrinciple of operation[edit] Operation is similar to that of a ball valve, which allows for quick shut off. Butterfly valves are generally favored because they cost less than other valve design, and are lighter weight so they need less support. The disc is positioned in the center of the pipe. A rod passes through the disc to an actuator on the outside of the valve. Rotating the actuator turns the disc either parallel or perpendicular to the flow. Unlike a ball valve, the disc is always present within the flow, so it induces a pressure drop, even when open. A butterfly valve is from a family of valves called quarter-turn valves
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Aloha 'Oe
"Aloha ʻOe" (Farewell to Thee) is Liliʻuokalani's most famous song and a common cultural symbol for Hawaii. The story of the origin of the song has several variations.[1] They all have in common that the song was inspired by a notable farewell embrace given by Colonel James Harbottle Boyd during a horseback trip taken by Princess Liliʻuokalani in 1877 or 1878 to the Boyd ranch in Maunawili on the windward side of Oʻahu, and that the members of the party hummed the tune on the way back to Honolulu. Different versions tell of alternate recipients of the embrace — either Liliʻuokalani's sister Princess Likelike
Likelike
Cleghorn or a young lady at the ranch.[2] According to the most familiar version of the story:This tender farewell set Liliʻuokalani to thinking, and she began humming to herself on the homeward trip
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J.C. Deagan, Inc.
J.C. Deagan, Inc.
J.C. Deagan, Inc.
was a developer and manufacturer of percussion instruments from the late 19th to the mid-20th century. The company was founded in 1880 by John Calhoun Deagan (1853–1934) and initially manufactured glockenspiels (orchestra bells). It was noted for its development of the xylophone, vibraharp (vibraphone), organ chimes, aluminum chimes, aluminum harp, Swiss handbells, the marimba, and orchestra bells. Church bells were revolutionized by Deagan through his design of tubular bells, and the NBC chimes
NBC chimes
were his creation.[3] Its former headquarters, the tower of which still bears the company name, is a landmark in the Ravenswood neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois.[4] In 1978 the Deagan company was sold to Slingerland Drum Company, which in turn sold it to Sanlar Corporation in 1984
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J.C. Deagan Company
J.C. Deagan, Inc.
J.C. Deagan, Inc.
was a developer and manufacturer of percussion instruments from the late 19th to the mid-20th century. The company was founded in 1880 by John Calhoun Deagan (1853–1934) and initially manufactured glockenspiels (orchestra bells). It was noted for its development of the xylophone, vibraharp (vibraphone), organ chimes, aluminum chimes, aluminum harp, Swiss handbells, the marimba, and orchestra bells. Church bells were revolutionized by Deagan through his design of tubular bells, and the NBC chimes
NBC chimes
were his creation.[3] Its former headquarters, the tower of which still bears the company name, is a landmark in the Ravenswood neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois.[4] In 1978 the Deagan company was sold to Slingerland Drum Company, which in turn sold it to Sanlar Corporation in 1984
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Aluminium
Aluminium
Aluminium
or aluminum is a chemical element with symbol Al and atomic number 13. It is a silvery-white, soft, nonmagnetic and ductile metal in the boron group. By mass, aluminium makes up about 8% of the Earth's crust; it is the third most abundant element after oxygen and silicon and the most abundant metal in the crust, though it is less common in the mantle below. The chief ore of aluminium is bauxite. Aluminium
Aluminium
metal is so chemically reactive that native specimens are rare and limited to extreme reducing environments. Instead, it is found combined in over 270 different minerals.[5] Aluminium
Aluminium
is remarkable for its low density and its ability to resist corrosion through the phenomenon of passivation
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Steel
Steel
Steel
is an alloy of iron and carbon and other elements. Because of its high tensile strength and low cost, it is a major component used in buildings, infrastructure, tools, ships, automobiles, machines, appliances, and weapons. Iron
Iron
is the base metal of steel. Iron
Iron
is able to take on two crystalline forms (allotropic forms), body centered cubic (BCC) and face centered cubic (FCC), depending on its temperature. In the body-centred cubic arrangement, there is an iron atom in the centre of each cube, and in the face-centred cubic, there is one at the center of each of the six faces of the cube
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Paul Barbarin
Adolphe Paul Barbarin
Paul Barbarin
(May 5, 1899 – February 17, 1969) was an American jazz drummer from New Orleans. Career[edit] Barbarian grew up in New Orleans in a family of musicians, including his father, three of his brothers, and his nephew (Danny Barker). He was a member of the Silver Leaf Orchestra and the Young Olympia Band. He moved to Chicago in 1917 and worked with Freddie Keppard and Jimmie Noone. From 1925–1927, he was a member of King Oliver's band. During the following year, he moved to New York City and played in Luis Russell's band for about four years. He left Russell and worked as a freelance musician, but he returned to Russell's band when it supported Louis Armstrong. For a brief time beginning in 1942, he worked for Red Allen's sextet, with Sidney Bechet
Sidney Bechet
in 1944 and Art Hodes in 1953. In 1955 he founded the Onward Brass Band in New Orleans
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Range (music)
In music, the range, or chromatic range, of a musical instrument is the distance from the lowest to the highest pitch it can play. For a singing voice, the equivalent is vocal range. The range of a musical part is the distance between its lowest and highest note.Contents1 Compass 2 Other ranges 3 Range limits 4 Typical ranges 5 See also 6 NotesCompass[edit] Among British English
British English
speakers,[1] and perhaps others,[2] compass means the same thing as chromatic range—the interval between the lowest and highest note attainable by a voice or musical instrument. Other ranges[edit] The terms sounding range, written range, designated range, duration range and dynamic range have specific meanings. The sounding range[3] refers to the pitches produced by an instrument, while the written range[3] refers to the compass (span) of notes written in the sheet music, where the part is sometimes transposed for convenience
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Adams Musical Instruments
Adams Musical Instruments is a manufacturer of percussion instruments based in the Netherlands.Contents1 History 2 Cooperation 3 Awards 4 Location 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] André Adams, founder of the company, started repairing brass instruments in 1970. Music was his hobby, and engineering was his passion
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