HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Via Flaminia
The Via Flaminia
Via Flaminia
was an ancient Roman road
Roman road
leading from Rome
Rome
over the Apennine Mountains
Apennine Mountains
to Ariminum (Rimini) on the coast of the Adriatic Sea, and due to the ruggedness of the mountains was the major option the Romans had for travel between Etruria, Latium, Campania, and the Po Valley. Today the same route, still called by the same name for much of its distance, is paralleled or overlaid by Strada Statale (SS) 3, also called Strada Regionale (SR) 3 in Lazio
Lazio
and Umbria, and Strada Provinciale (SP) 3 in Marche. It leaves Rome, goes up the Val Tevere ("Valley of the Tiber
Tiber
River") and into the mountains at Castello delle Formiche, ascends to Gualdo Tadino, continuing over the divide at Scheggia Pass, 575 m (1,886 ft) to Cagli
[...More...]

"Via Flaminia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Etruscan Civilization
Timeline Italy
Italy
portalv t eThe Etruscan civilization
Etruscan civilization
(/ɪˈtrʌskən/) is the modern name given to a powerful and wealthy civilization of ancient Italy
Italy
in the area corresponding roughly to Tuscany, western Umbria
Umbria
and northern Lazio.[2] As distinguished by its unique language, this civilization endured from before the time of the earliest Etruscan inscriptions (c. 700 BC)[3] until its assimilation into the Roman Republic, beginning in the late 4th century BC with the Roman–Etruscan Wars.[3] Culture that is identifiably Etruscan developed in Italy
Italy
after about 800 BC, approximately over the range of the preceding Iron Age Villanovan
Villanovan
culture. The latter gave way in the 7th century BC to a culture that was influenced by Ancient
Ancient
Greek culture
[...More...]

"Etruscan Civilization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lombards
The Lombards
Lombards
or Longobards (Latin: Langobardi, Italian: Longobardi [loŋɡoˈbardi], Lombard: Longobard (Western)) were a Germanic people who ruled most of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
from 568 to 774. The Lombard historian Paul the Deacon
Paul the Deacon
wrote in the Historia Langobardorum that the Lombards
Lombards
descended from a small tribe called the Winnili,[1] who dwelt in southern Scandinavia[2] (Scadanan) before migrating to seek new lands. In the 1st century AD, they formed part of the Suebi, in northwestern Germany. By the end of the 5th century, they had moved into the area roughly coinciding with modern Austria and Slovakia
Slovakia
north of the Danube
Danube
river, where they subdued the Heruls and later fought frequent wars with the Gepids
[...More...]

"Lombards" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rome
Rome
Rome
(/roʊm/ ROHM; Italian: Roma i[ˈroːma]; Latin: Roma [ˈroːma]) is the capital of Italy
Italy
and a special comune (named Comune
Comune
di Roma Capitale). Rome
Rome
also serves as the capital of the Lazio
Lazio
region. With 2,874,558 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi),[1] it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth-most populous city in the European Union
European Union
by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4.3 million residents.[2] Rome
Rome
is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber
[...More...]

"Rome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Marcus Aemilius Scaurus (consul 115 BC)
Marcus Aemilius Scaurus (born ca. 163 BC – died 89 BC) was a Roman statesman who served as consul in 115 BC. He was also a long-standing princeps senatus, occupying the post from 115 BC until his death in 89 BC, and as such was widely considered one of the most prestigious and influential politicians of the Late Republic.Contents1 Career1.1 Early career 1.2 Consulship 1.3 'Father of the Senate' 1.4 Late 90s BC2 Legacy 3 Marriage and children 4 References 5 SourcesCareer[edit] Early career[edit] Scaurus was born into a prestigious but impoverished patrician family: Cicero, for instance, comments that Scaurus was so poor as to be effectively a novus homo.[1] In order to maintain the family lifestyle, his father became a coal-dealer. However, Scaurus himself declined any commercial activities (forbidden for senators) and embarked on a political life. Scaurus’ cursus honorum started when he became a military tribune in the Hispania provinces
[...More...]

"Marcus Aemilius Scaurus (consul 115 BC)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Triumphal Arches
A triumphal arch is a monumental structure in the shape of an archway with one or more arched passageways, often designed to span a road. In its simplest form a triumphal arch consists of two massive piers connected by an arch, crowned with a flat entablature or attic on which a statue might be mounted or which bears commemorative inscriptions. The main structure is often decorated with carvings, sculpted reliefs, and dedications. More elaborate triumphal arches may have multiple archways. Triumphal arches are one of the most influential and distinctive types of architecture associated with ancient Rome
[...More...]

"Triumphal Arches" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vespasian
Vespasian
Vespasian
(/vɛsˈpeɪʒiən, vɛsˈpeɪziən/; Latin: Titus
Titus
Flavius Vespasianus;[note 1] 17 November 9 – 24 June 79 AD)[1] was Roman emperor from AD 69 to AD 79, the fourth, and last, in the Year of the Four Emperors. He founded the Flavian dynasty
Flavian dynasty
that ruled the Empire for 27 years. Vespasian
Vespasian
was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors
[...More...]

"Vespasian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Trajan
Trajan
Trajan
(/ˈtreɪdʒən/; Latin: Imperator Caesar Nerva
Nerva
Trajanus Divi Nervae filius Augustus;[1][2] 18 September 53 – 8 August 117 AD) was Roman emperor
Roman emperor
from 98 to 117 AD. Officially declared by the Senate optimus princeps ("the best ruler"), Trajan
Trajan
is remembered as a successful soldier-emperor who presided over the greatest military expansion in Roman history, leading the empire to attain its maximum territorial extent by the time of his death
[...More...]

"Trajan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Middle Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Middle Ages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ravenna
Ravenna
Ravenna
(Italian pronunciation: [raˈvenna], also locally [raˈvɛnna] ( listen); Romagnol: Ravèna) is the capital city of the Province of Ravenna, in the Emilia-Romagna
Emilia-Romagna
region of Northern Italy. It was the capital city of the Western Roman Empire from 402 until that empire collapsed in 476. It then served as the capital of the Ostrogothic Kingdom
Ostrogothic Kingdom
until it was re-conquered in 540 by the Byzantine Empire. Afterwards, the city formed the centre of the Byzantine Exarchate of Ravenna
Exarchate of Ravenna
until the invasion of the Lombards
Lombards
in 751, after which it became the seat of the Kingdom of the Lombards. Although an inland city, Ravenna
Ravenna
is connected to the Adriatic Sea
Adriatic Sea
by the Candiano Canal
[...More...]

"Ravenna" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Exarchate Of Ravenna
The Exarchate of Ravenna
Ravenna
or of Italy
Italy
(Italian: Esarcato d'Italia) was a region of the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
in Italy, from 584 to 751, when the last exarch was put to death by the Lombards.[1] It was one of two exarchates established following the western reconquests under Emperor Justinian to more effectively administrate the territories, along with the Exarchate of Africa.Contents1 Introduction 2 Lombard invasion and Byzantine reaction 3 Exarchate 4 End of the Exarchate 5 Exarchs of Ravenna 6 References 7 SourcesIntroduction[edit] Ravenna
Ravenna
became the capital of the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
in 402 under Honorius, due to its fine harbour with access to the Adriatic
Adriatic
and its ideal defensive location amidst impassable marshes
[...More...]

"Exarchate Of Ravenna" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
[...More...]

"Renaissance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Italia (Roman Empire)
Italia was the name of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
during the Roman era. It was not a province, but the territory of the city of Rome, thus having a special status.[1] Italy and its borders expanded over time, until Augustus
Augustus
finally organized it as an administrative division consisting of eleven regions (from the Alps
Alps
to the Ionian Sea). The islands of Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily
Sicily
and Malta
Malta
were added to Italy by Diocletian in 292 AD. Roman Italy
Roman Italy
remained united until the sixth century, when it was divided between the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
and territories of the Germanic peoples
[...More...]

"Italia (Roman Empire)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Napoleon I
Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars. As Napoleon, he was Emperor of the French
Emperor of the French
from 1804 until 1814, and again briefly in 1815 during the Hundred Days. Napoleon
Napoleon
dominated European and global affairs for more than a decade while leading France
France
against a series of coalitions in the Napoleonic Wars. He won most of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, building a large empire that ruled over continental Europe before its final collapse in 1815. He is considered one of the greatest commanders in history, and his wars and campaigns are studied at military schools worldwide
[...More...]

"Napoleon I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Po Valley
The Po Valley, Po Plain, Plain of the Po, or Padan Plain (Italian: Pianura Padana [pjaˈnuːra paˈdaːna], or Val Padana) is a major geographical feature of Northern Italy. It extends approximately 650 km (400 mi) in an east-west direction, with an area of 46,000 square kilometres (18,000 sq mi) including its Venetic extension not actually related to the Po river basin; it runs from the Western Alps
Alps
to the Adriatic Sea. The flatlands of Veneto
Veneto
and Friuli
Friuli
are often considered apart since they do not drain into the Po, but they effectively combine into an unbroken plain. The plain is the surface of an in-filled system of ancient canyons (the "Apennine Foredeep") extending from the Apennines
Apennines
in the south to the Alps
Alps
in the north, including the northern Adriatic
[...More...]

"Po Valley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.