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Vektor LM6
The R4 is a South African 5.56×45mm assault rifle.[4] It entered service as the standard service rifle of the South African Defence Force (SADF) in 1980.[1] The R4 replaced the R1, a variant of the 7.62×51mm
7.62×51mm
FN FAL
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South African National Museum Of Military History
The South African National War Museum in Johannesburg
Johannesburg
was officially opened by Prime Minister Jan Smuts
Jan Smuts
on 29 August 1947 to preserve the history of South Africa's involvement in the Second World War. In 1975, the museum was renamed the South African National Museum of Military History and its function changed to include all conflicts that South Africa
South Africa
has been involved in.[1] In 1999 it was amalgamated with the Pretoria-based Transvaal Museum
Transvaal Museum
and National Cultural History Museum to form the NFI
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Tritium
Tritium Complete table of nuclidesGeneralName, symbol tritium, 3HNeutrons 2Protons 1Nuclide dataNatural abundance traceHalf-life 12.32 yearsDecay products 3HeIsotope mass 3.0160492 uSpin ​1⁄2Excess energy 14,949.794± 0.001 keVBinding energy 8,481.821± 0.004 keVDecay mode Decay energyBeta emission 0.018590 MeV Tritium
Tritium
(/ˈtrɪtiəm/ or /ˈtrɪʃiəm/; symbol T or 3H, also known as hydrogen-3) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. The nucleus of tritium (sometimes called a triton) contains one proton and two neutrons, whereas the nucleus of protium (by far the most abundant hydrogen isotope) contains one proton and no neutrons. Naturally occurring tritium is extremely rare on Earth, where trace amounts are formed by the interaction of the atmosphere with cosmic rays. It can be produced by irradiating lithium metal or lithium-bearing ceramic pebbles in a nuclear reactor
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Gunpowder
Gunpowder, also known as black powder to distinguish it from modern smokeless powder, is the earliest known chemical explosive. It consists of a mixture of sulfur, charcoal, and potassium nitrate (saltpeter)
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Bolt (firearm)
A bolt is the part of a repeating, breech-loading firearm that blocks the rear of the chamber while the propellant burns and moves to facilitate loading of cartridges from the magazine. The extractor and firing pin are often integral parts of the boltContents1 Description 2 Closed bolt vs. Open bolt 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] In manually operated firearms, such as bolt-action, lever-action, and pump-action rifles and shotguns, the bolt is held fixed by its locking lugs during firing, forcing all the expanding gas forward, and is manually withdrawn to chamber another round. In an automatic or semi-automatic firearm, the bolt cycles back and forward between each shot, propelled by recoil or expanding gas (back) or the recoil spring (forward). When it moves back, the extractor pulls the spent casing from the chamber
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Receiver (firearms)
In firearms terminology, the firearm receiver or firearm frame is the part of a firearm which provides housing for internal components such as the hammer, bolt or breechblock, action and firing mechanism, and is usually threaded at its forward portion to "receive" the barrel and has screw holes on the bottom and/or rear to receive the stock and grip.[1] The receiver is often made of forged, machined, or stamped steel or aluminium; in addition to these traditional materials, modern science and engineering have introduced polymers and sintered metal powders to receiver construction.[2]Contents1 In US law1.1 Unfinished receivers2 Notable receivers 3 ReferencesIn US law[edit] AR-15
AR-15
rifles showing their configurations with different upper receivers (stripped-down lower receiver is visible at bottom)For the purposes of United States law, the receiver or frame is legally the firearm,[3] and as such it is the controlled part
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Sheet Metal
Sheet metal
Sheet metal
is metal formed by an industrial process into thin, flat pieces. Sheet metal
Sheet metal
is one of the fundamental forms used in metalworking and it can be cut and bent into a variety of shapes. Countless everyday objects are fabricated from sheet metal. Thicknesses can vary significantly; extremely thin sheets are considered foil or leaf, and pieces thicker than 6 mm (0.25 in) are considered plate. Sheet metal
Sheet metal
is available in flat pieces or coiled strips. The coils are formed by running a continuous sheet of metal through a roll slitter. In most of the world, sheet metal thickness is consistently specified in millimeters. In the US, the thickness of sheet metal is commonly specified by a traditional, non-linear measure known as its gauge. The larger the gauge number, the thinner the metal. Commonly used steel sheet metal ranges from 30 gauge to about 7 gauge
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Flash Suppressor
A flash suppressor, also known as a flash guard, flash eliminator, flash hider, or flash cone, is a device attached to the muzzle of a rifle that reduces its visible signature while firing by cooling or dispersing the burning gases that exit the muzzle, a phenomenon typical of carbine-length weapons. Its primary intent is to reduce the chances that the shooter will be blinded in low-light shooting conditions. Contrary to popular belief, it is only a minor secondary benefit if a flash suppressor reduces the intensity of the flash visible to the enemy.[1] A flash suppressor is different from a muzzle brake, although they are typically mounted in the same position and sometimes confused with each other
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Rifle Grenade
A rifle grenade is a grenade that uses a rifle-based launcher to permit a longer effective range than would be possible if the grenade was thrown by hand. The practice of projecting grenades with rifle-mounted launchers was first widely used during World War I
World War I
and continues to the present, with the term "rifle grenade" now encompassing many different types of payloads including high explosive, fragmentation, and anti-tank warheads as well as concussion, smoke, incendiary, and flare missiles.
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Bipod
A bipod is an attachment, usually to a weapon, that helps support and steady it. The bipod provides significant stability along two axes of motion (side-to-side, and up-and-down). Bipod
Bipod
comes from the Latin and Greek roots bi and pod, meaning "two" and "foot, or feet" respectively.[1] Firearms[edit]A Sako TRG
Sako TRG
sniper rifle on its standard factory bipod and its monopod under the stockMain article: Weapon mount On firearms, bipods are commonly used on rifles and machine guns to provide a forward rest and reduce motion. They are also seen on other long-barrelled weapons. Bipods permit operators to easily rest a weapon on objects, like the ground or a wall, reducing their fatigue and increasing accuracy and stability. Bipods can be of fixed or adjustable length. Some can be tilted and also have their tilting point close to the barrel's central axis, allowing the weapon to tilt left and right
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Barbed Wire
Barbed wire, also known as barb wire, less often as bob wire[1][2] or, in the southeastern United States, bobbed wire,[3] is a type of steel fencing wire constructed with sharp edges or points arranged at intervals along the strand(s). It is used to construct inexpensive fences and is used atop walls surrounding secured property. It is also a major feature of the fortifications in trench warfare (as a wire obstacle). A person or animal trying to pass through or over barbed wire will suffer discomfort and possibly injury. Barbed wire
Barbed wire
fencing requires only fence posts, wire, and fixing devices such as staples. It is simple to construct and quick to erect, even by an unskilled person. The first patent in the United States for barbed wire was issued in 1867 to Lucien B. Smith of Kent, Ohio, who is regarded as the inventor.[4][5] Joseph F. Glidden
Joseph F

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Pistol Grip
On a firearm or other tool, the pistol grip is that portion of the mechanism that is held by the hand and orients the hand in a forward, vertical orientation, similar to the position one would take with a conventional pistol.[1] For firearms, the pistol grip is generally used by the hand that operates the trigger. Rifles and shotguns without pistol grips are generally referred to as having "straight" or "upland" (shotguns only) style stocks. Some firearms, such as some versions of the Thompson submachine gun, have a forward pistol grip which is used to stabilize the firearm in operation. The pistol grip often serves multiple functions such as a magazine housing, bipod, or tool storage. In some firearms, like the Finnish light machine gun Kk 62, the pistol grip is also used as a handle to charge the weapon. Pistol
Pistol
grips are a defining feature in United States gun law. A forward pistol grip on a pistol is restricted under the National Firearms Act
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Iron Sights
Iron sights
Iron sights
are a system of shaped alignment markers (usually metal) used as a sighting device to assist in the aiming of a device such as a firearm, crossbow, or telescope, and exclude the use of optics as in reflector (reflex) sights, holographic sights, and telescopic sights.[1] Iron sights
Iron sights
are typically composed of two component sights, formed by metal blades: a rear sight mounted perpendicular to the line of sight and a front sight that is a post, bead, or ring. Open sights use a notch of some sort as the rear sight, while aperture sights use some form of a circular hole. Civilian, hunting, and police firearms usually feature open sights, while many military battle rifles employ aperture sights. The earliest and simplest iron sights are fixed and cannot be easily adjusted
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Sling (firearms)
In the context of firearms, a sling is a type of strap or harness designed to allow a shooter to conveniently carry a firearm (usually a long gun such as a rifle, carbine, shotgun, or submachine gun) on his/her body, and/or to aid in greater hit probability by allowing the firearm to be better braced and stabilized during aiming
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Galil
The Galil is a family of Israeli small arms designed by Yisrael Galil and Yaacov Lior in the late 1960s and produced by Israel
Israel
Military Industries (IMI) (IMI privatized their small arms division, now called IWI) of Ramat HaSharon. The rifle design borrows heavily from the RK-62
RK-62
and has a modified gas diversion system similar to the RK-62
RK-62
to reduce the recoil of the rifle making it easier to fire especially in automatic mode.[4] The weapon system consists of a line chambered for the intermediate 5.56×45mm NATO
5.56×45mm NATO
caliber with either the M193 or SS109 ball cartridge and several models designed for use with the 7.62×51mm NATO rifle round. It is named after one of its inventors, Yisrael Galil
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Picatinny Rail
The Picatinny rail
Picatinny rail
(/ˈpɪkətɪni/ or /ˌpɪkəˈtɪni/), or Pic rail for short, also known as a MIL-STD-1913 rail, or Standardization Agreement 2324 rail, is a mil-spec firearm rail interface system that provides a standard accessory mounting platform consisting of a hexagonal rail with multiple transverse slots, similar in concept to the earlier commercial Weaver r
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