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Vegetarian Hot Dog
A vegetarian hot dog is a hot dog produced completely from non-meat products. Vegetarian hot dogs are sometimes also eaten by non-vegetarians because they are low or non-fat, have fewer calories, contain no cholesterol, and little to no saturated fat, compared to hot dogs from animal meats.[1] Therefore, they are preferred by people following a low calorie, low fat or low cholesterol diet
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Diet (nutrition)
In nutrition, diet is the sum of food consumed by a person or other organism.[1] The word diet often implies the use of specific intake of nutrition for health or weight-management reasons (with the two often being related). Although humans are omnivores, each culture and each person holds some food preferences or some food taboos. This may be due to personal tastes or ethical reasons. Individual dietary choices may be more or less healthy. Complete nutrition requires ingestion and absorption of vitamins, minerals, essential amino acids from protein and essential fatty acids from fat-containing food, also food energy in the form of carbohydrate, protein, and fat
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Chicago White Sox
The Chicago
Chicago
White Sox are an American professional baseball team based in Chicago. The White Sox compete in Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) as a member club of the American League
American League
(AL) Central division. Home games are held at Guaranteed Rate Field, located on the city's South Side, and the team is owned by Jerry Reinsdorf. They are one of two major league clubs in Chicago; the other is the Chicago
Chicago
Cubs, who are a member of the National League
National League
(NL) Central division. One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the franchise was established as a major league baseball club in 1901. The club was originally called the Chicago
Chicago
White Stockings, but this was soon shortened to Chicago
Chicago
White Sox
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Saturated Fat
A saturated fat is a type of fat in which the fatty acid chains have all or predominantly single bonds. A fat is made of two kinds of smaller molecules: glycerol and fatty acids. Fats are made of long chains of carbon (C) atoms. Some carbon atoms are linked by single bonds (-C-C-) and others are linked by double bonds (-C=C-).[1] Double bonds can react with hydrogen to form single bonds. They are called saturated, because the second bond is broken up and each half of the bond is attached to (saturated with) a hydrogen atom. Most animal fats are saturated
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Calorie
A calorie is a unit of energy. Various definitions exist but fall into two broad categories. The first, the small calorie, or gram calorie (symbol: cal), is defined as the approximate amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree Celsius
Celsius
at a pressure of one atmosphere.[1] The second is the large calorie or kilogram calorie (symbol: Cal), also known as the food calorie and similar names,[2] is defined in terms of the kilogram rather than the gram. It is equal to 7003100000000000000♠1000 small calories or 1 kilocalorie (symbol: kcal).[1] Although these units relate to the metric system, all of them have been considered obsolete in science since the adoption of the SI system.[3] The unit of energy in the International System of Units
International System of Units
is the joule. One small calorie is approximately 4.2 joules (so one large calorie is about 4.2 kilojoules)
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Cholesterol
Cholesterol
Cholesterol
(from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
chole- (bile) and stereos (solid), followed by the chemical suffix -ol for an alcohol) is an organic molecule. It is a sterol (or modified steroid),[4] a type of lipid molecule, and is biosynthesized by all animal cells, because it is an essential structural component of all animal cell membranes and is essential to maintain both membrane structural integrity and fluidity. Cholesterol
Cholesterol
allows animal cells to function without a cell wall (which in other species protects membrane integrity and cell viability); this allows animal cells to change shape rapidly. In addition to its importance for animal cell structure, cholesterol also serves as a precursor for the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, bile acid[5] and vitamin D. Cholesterol
Cholesterol
is the principal sterol synthesized by all animals
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Vegan
Veganism
Veganism
is the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, and an associated philosophy that rejects the commodity status of animals.[b] A follower of either the diet or the philosophy is known as a vegan (pronounced /ˈviːɡən/,[c] /ˈveɪɡən/, or /ˈvɛdʒən/).[12] Distinctions are sometimes made between several categories of veganism
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U.S. Cellular Field
Guaranteed Rate
Guaranteed Rate
Field is a baseball park located in Chicago, Illinois, that serves as the home ballpark for the Chicago
Chicago
White Sox
White Sox
of Major League Baseball. The facility is owned by the state of Illinois through the Illinois Sports Facilities Authority, and is operated by the White Sox. The park opened for the 1991 season, after the White Sox had spent 81 years at the original Comiskey Park. It also opened with the name Comiskey Park
Comiskey Park
but was renamed U.S. Cellular
U.S. Cellular
Field in 2003 after U.S. Cellular
U.S

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Plant Milk
Plant milk
Plant milk
has been consumed for centuries in various cultures, both as a regular drink (such as the Spanish horchata) and as a substitute for dairy milk. The most popular varieties are soy milk, almond milk, rice milk and coconut milk. The protein content varies. It contains no lactose or cholesterol, and is usually sold with added calcium and vitamins, especially B12. There are several reasons for consuming plant milk: ethical (animal welfare) reasons, environmental reasons, health reasons, including lactose intolerance, milk allergy and PKU; veganism and ovo-vegetarianism; religious reasons, such as by some Christian denominations during Lent; and simple taste preference. In the United States, soy milk was long the most popular non-dairy milk, but, starting around 2010, almond milk began to increase in popularity, and in 2013 it surpassed soy milk as the most popular variety.[1] Other popular milks in the US are rice and coconut
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Meat Analogue
A meat analogue, also called a meat alternative, meat substitute, mock meat, faux meat, imitation meat, (where applicable) vegetarian meat, or vegan meat, approximates certain aesthetic qualities (primarily texture, flavor and appearance) and/or chemical characteristics of specific types of meat. Many analogues are soy-based (see: tofu, tempeh) or gluten-based. Generally, meat analogue is understood to mean a food made from non-meats, sometimes without other animal products, such as dairy. The market for meat imitations includes vegetarians, vegans, non-vegetarians seeking to reduce their meat consumption for health or ethical reasons, and people following religious dietary laws in Hinduism, Judaism, Islam, and Buddhism. Tofu, a popular meat analogue, was invented in China during the Han dynasty.[1] A document written by Tao Gu (903–970) describes how tofu was called "small mutton" and valued as an imitation meat
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Kongguksu
Kong-guksu[2] (콩국수) or noodles in cold soybean soup[2] is a seasonal Korean noodle dish served in a cold soy milk broth. It comprises noodles made with wheat flour and soup made from ground soybeans.[3] It is unknown when Korean people started eating kongguksu; however, in accordance with the mention of the dish along with kkaeguksu (깨국수, sesame noodle soup) in Siui jeonseo, a Joseon cookbook published around the late 19th century, it is presumed to have originated at least as early as the 19th century.[4] See also[edit]Korean cuisine Naengmyeon KalguksuReferences[edit]^ "kong-guksu" 콩국수. Korean Food Foundation (in Korean). Retrieved 16 May 2017.  ^ a b (in Korean) "주요 한식명(200개) 로마자 표기 및 번역(영, 중, 일) 표준안" [Standardized Romanizations and Translations (English, Chinese, and Japanese) of (200) Major Korean Dishes] (PDF). National Institute of Korean Language. 2014-07-30. Retrieved 2017-02-15
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Douhua
Douhua
Douhua
(Chinese: 豆花; pinyin: dòuhuā) is the short form of doufuhua (Chinese: 豆腐花; pinyin: dòufuhuā). It is a Chinese snack made with very soft tofu. It is also referred to as tofu pudding and soybean pudding.Contents1 History 2 Traditions2.1 Northern Chinese cuisine 2.2 Sichuan cuisine 2.3 Hubei cuisine 2.4 Cantonese
Cantonese
cuisine 2.5 Taiwanese cuisine 2.6 Southeast Asian cuisine2.6.1 Philippine cuisine 2.6.2 Indonesian cuisine 2.6.3 Malaysian and Singaporean cuisine 2.6.4 Thai cuisine 2.6.5 Vietnamese cuisine3 Packaged 4 Requirements 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Tofu
Tofu
or doufu (Chinese: 豆腐, dòufu) is thought to have originated in ancient China
China
during the Western Han Dynasty
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Dubu Kimchi
Dubu-kimchi
Dubu-kimchi
(두부김치) is a Korean dish consisting of tofu and stir-fried kimchi.[2] Soft, warm, blanched tofu is served with well-fermented, tangy baechu-kimchi (napa cabbage kimchi) stir-fried with pork, makes a well-matched anju (accompaniments to alcoholic drinks) for either soju or makgeolli.[3] Preparation[edit] Well-fermented baechu-kimchi (napa cabbage kimchi) is sliced into bite size pieces, while the pork is sliced into similar shape and size of kimchi and marinated with gochujang, soy sauce, gochutgaru (chili powder), grated ginger, minced garlic, and sugar.[4] Onions are sliced into
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