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Vechtstreek
The Vechtstreek
Vechtstreek
(Dutch pronunciation: [ˈvɛxtstreːk]) (Dutch for "Vecht area") is a region in the Dutch provinces of Utrecht and North Holland along the Vecht River between the towns of Utrecht and Amsterdam. Located in the economic heartland of the Netherlands, it is known for its natural environment, castles, parks and stately homes.Contents1 Location 2 Vestiges of the Dutch Golden Age 3 Fen
Fen
lakes 4 Sailing 5 External linksLocation[edit] The Vecht River begins in the historic centre of Utrecht, where it receives much of its water from the Kromme Rijn, a minor branch of the Lower Rhine
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Tea House
A teahouse is an establishment which primarily serves tea and other light refreshments. Sometimes the word "tea" is also used to refer to a meal. Although the functions of teahouses vary widely in different countries, teahouses often serve as centers of social interaction, like coffeehouses. Some cultures have a variety of distinct tea-centered establishments of different types, depending on the national tea culture
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Vinkeveen
Vinkeveen
Vinkeveen
is a town in the Dutch province of Utrecht. It is a part of the municipality of De Ronde Venen, and lies about 18 km south of Amsterdam. The neighbourhood of Vinkeveen, which covers the town of Vinkeveen
Vinkeveen
and the neighbouring hamlet of Achterbos, has about 8400 inhabitants.[1] Vinkeveen
Vinkeveen
used to be a separate municipality. It merged with Waverveen in 1841, to form the municipality Vinkeveen
Vinkeveen
en Waverveen. In 1989 there was a reorganisation of local governments, and Vinkeveen
Vinkeveen
became a part of De Ronde Venen.Satellite image of Vinkeveen
Vinkeveen
and the Vinkeveense Plassen Vinkeveen
Vinkeveen
is mainly famous for the Vinkeveense Plassen (Lakes of Vinkeveen), an area of lakes and sand islands east of the village
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IJsselmeer
The IJsselmeer
IJsselmeer
(Dutch pronunciation: [ɛi̯səlˈmeːr]; West Frisian language: Iselmar), is a closed off inland bay in the central Netherlands
Netherlands
bordering the provinces of Flevoland, North Holland
North Holland
and Friesland. It measures 1100 km² with an average depth of 5.5 m. The river IJssel
IJssel
flows into the IJsselmeer. The first two letters of the name are capitalized because IJ is a digraph or even a ligature in Dutch, so it is treated as a single letter.Contents1 History 2 Current use 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]Traditional boat on the IJsselmeerSunset over the IJsselmeerTwo thousand years ago Pomponius Mela, a Roman geographer, mentioned a complex of lakes at the current location of the IJsselmeer. He called it Lacus Flevo.[1] Over the centuries, the lake banks crumbled away due to flooding and wave action and the lake grew considerably
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Peat
Peat
Peat
(/piːt/), also called turf (/tɜːrf/), is an accumulation of partially decayed vegetation or organic matter that is unique to natural areas called peatlands, bogs, mires, moors, or muskegs.[1][2] The peatland ecosystem is the most efficient carbon sink on the planet,[2] because peatland plants capture CO2 naturally released from the peat, maintaining an equilibrium. In natural peatlands, the "annual rate of biomass production is greater than the rate of decomposition", but it takes "thousands of years for peatlands to develop the deposits of 1.5 to 2.3 m [4.9 to 7.5 ft], which is the average depth of the boreal [northern] peatlands".[2] Sphagnum
Sphagnum
moss, also called peat moss, is one of the most common components in peat, although many other plants can contribute. Soils consisting primarily of peat are known as histosols
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Fen
A fen is one of the main types of wetland, the others being grassy marshes, forested swamps, and peaty bogs. Along with bogs, fens are a kind of mire. Fens are minerotrophic peatlands,[1] usually fed by mineral-rich surface water or groundwater.[2] They are characterised by their distinct water chemistry, which is pH neutral or alkaline, with relatively high dissolved mineral levels but few other plant nutrients
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Bog
A bog is a wetland that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material—often mosses, and in a majority of cases, sphagnum moss.[1] It is one of the four main types of wetlands. Other names for bogs include mire, quagmire, and muskeg; alkaline mires are called fens. They are frequently covered in ericaceous shrubs rooted in the sphagnum moss and peat. The gradual accumulation of decayed plant material in a bog functions as a carbon sink.[2] Bogs occur where the water at the ground surface is acidic and low in nutrients. In some cases, the water is derived entirely from precipitation, in which case they are termed ombrotrophic (rain-fed). Water flowing out of bogs has a characteristic brown colour, which comes from dissolved peat tannins. In general, the low fertility and cool climate results in relatively slow plant growth, but decay is even slower owing to the saturated soil. Hence peat accumulates
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Natura 2000
Natura 2000
Natura 2000
is a network of nature protection areas in the territory of the European Union. It is made up of Special
Special
Areas of Conservation (SACs) and Special
Special
Protection Areas (SPAs) designated respectively under the Habitats Directive and Birds Directive. The network includes both terrestrial and marine sites (Marine Protected Areas (MPAs)).Contents1 History 2 Current status 3 Raising awareness about Natura 2000
Natura 2000
amongst the general public3.1 Natura 2000
Natura 2000
Day 3.2 The Natura 2000
Natura 2000
Award4 Controversy 5 References 6 See also 7 External linksHistory[edit] In May 1992, the governments of the European Communities adopted legislation designed to protect the most seriously threatened habitats and species across Europe
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Loosdrecht
Loosdrecht
Loosdrecht
is a town in the municipality of Wijdemeren, North Holland, Netherlands[1] with a population of about 8,600 inhabitants. Loosdrecht
Loosdrecht
consists of two small villages: Nieuw-Loosdrecht
Nieuw-Loosdrecht
and Oud-Loosdrecht. Nieuw Loosdrecht
Loosdrecht
covers a small area densely populated; Oud-Loosdrecht
Oud-Loosdrecht
consists mainly of lakeside villas. Until 2002 Loosdrecht
Loosdrecht
was a separate municipality in the province of Utrecht, covering the villages of Oud-Loosdrecht
Oud-Loosdrecht
and Nieuw-Loosdrecht, and the hamlets of Breukeleveen and Muyeveld. Loosdrecht
Loosdrecht
is known for its beautiful lakes, the Loosdrechtse Plassen, which thousands of tourists visit every year
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Maarssen
Maarssen
Maarssen
( pronunciation (help·info)) is a town in the middle of the Netherlands, in the province of Utrecht, along the river Vecht and the Amsterdam–Rhine Canal. The west of Maarssen
Maarssen
is called Maarssen-Broek[1] whereas the east is called Maarssen-Dorp
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Dutch Golden Age
The Dutch Golden Age
Dutch Golden Age
(Dutch: Gouden Eeuw [ˈɣʌu̯də(n) ˈeːu̯]) was a period in the history of the Netherlands, roughly spanning the 17th century, in which Dutch trade, science, military, and art were among the most acclaimed in the world. The first section is characterized by the Thirty Years' War, which ended in 1648. The Golden Age continued in peacetime during the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
until the end of the century. The transition by the Netherlands
Netherlands
to the foremost maritime and economic power in the world has been called the "Dutch Miracle" by historian K. W
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Lower Rhine
The Lower Rhine
Rhine
(German: Niederrhein; kilometres 660 to 1,033 of the river Rhine) flows from Bonn, Germany, to the North Sea
North Sea
at Hoek van Holland, Netherlands
Netherlands
(including the Nederrijn
Nederrijn
or "Nether Rhine" within the Rhine–Meuse–Scheldt delta); alternatively, Lower Rhine
Rhine
may be refer to the part upstream of Pannerdens Kop, excluding the Nederrijn. Almost immediately after entering the Netherlands, the Rhine
Rhine
splits into numerous branches. The main branch is called the Waal which flows from Nijmegen
Nijmegen
to meet the Meuse; after which it is called Merwede. Near Rotterdam
Rotterdam
the river is known as Nieuwe Maas, and becomes the Nieuwe Waterweg
Nieuwe Waterweg
flowing into the North Sea
North Sea
at Hoek van Holland
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Kromme Rijn
The Kromme Rijn
Kromme Rijn
(Dutch pronunciation: [ˈkrɔmə ˈrɛin]) ("Crooked Rhine", for its many bends) is a river in the central Netherlands. In Roman times, this northernmost branch of the Rhine
Rhine
delta was the main distributary of this major European river. Along its banks the Romans built their frontier castella part of the Limes Germanicus. Since the Middle Ages, however, the stream lost its importance as it silted up, and eventually it is nearly cut off from the Nederrijn-Lek main artery
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Netherlands
The Netherlands
The Netherlands
(/ˈnɛðərləndz/ ( listen); Dutch: Nederland [ˈneːdərˌlɑnt] ( listen)), also known informally as Holland, is a country in Western Europe
Europe
with a population of seventeen million
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Amsterdam
Amsterdam
Amsterdam
(/ˈæmstərdæm/;[9][10][11] Dutch: [ɑmstərˈdɑm] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous municipality of the Netherlands. Its status as the capital is mandated by the Constitution of the Netherlands,[12] although it is not the seat of the government, which is The Hague.[13] Amsterdam
Amsterdam
has a population of 851,373 within the city proper, 1,351,587 in the urban area,[14] and 2,410,960 in the Amsterdam metropolitan area.[8] The city is located in the province of North Holland in the west of the country but is not its capital, which is Haarlem. The metropolitan area comprises much of the northern part of the Randstad, one of the larger conurbations in Europe, with a population of approximately 7 million.[15] Amsterdam's name derives from Amstelredamme,[16] indicative of the city's origin around a dam in the river Amstel
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